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This directory contains user-provided DOOM source code modifications and related files. User patches to these engines can be found in the patches/ subdirectory. The BOOM engine mod and its 32-bit Windows port PRBoom can be found in the TeamTNT area: /pub/idgames/themes/TeamTNT/boom The officially released DOOM source code can be found in the idstuff/source subdirectory, not here. Questions? Contact idgmaint AT gamers.org .

46 files

  1. Calico 1.0

    Calico is a backport of the Atari Jaguar version of DOOM to PC. It is highly accurate and mostly feature complete as of this first release.

    12 downloads

       (0 reviews)

    Submitted

  2. Russian DOOM

    My first translation attempt was in 2001. Back then I was a teen with out much knowledge, and overall quality of translation of original DOS executable was not very good. But we with my colleague, Sergey "Disctrich" Ivanov was the first who figured out how to do this.

    15 years have passed, a lot of experience gained, both technical and informational, and only one question appears: "What if I apply all my current knowledge and redone that project from long time gone youth from scratch?".

    Chocolate Doom as code base was chooses because of it is one only modern source port with interpretation of original DOS executable, that good old game.

    Simon Howard, author of Chocolate Doom kindly accepts my request to work with his code, and two and a half months of hard work with code, graphics, design, translation and information searching was started.

    As result - all ingame content was fully translated, and I think I have done it well. :)

    13 downloads

       (7 reviews)

    Submitted

  3. DS Doom

    Nintendo DS source port based off of PrBoom

    19 downloads

       (12 reviews)

    Submitted

  4. DS Doom source code

    Nintendo DS source port based off of PrBoom

    10 downloads

       (6 reviews)

    Submitted

  5. PDoom source code

    Fork of DOSDoom 0.2 with flight, kill-all monsters, and quad damage cheat codes added.

    5 downloads

       (4 reviews)

    Submitted

  6. PDoom

    Fork of DOSDoom 0.2 with flight, kill-all monsters, and quad damage cheat codes added.

    6 downloads

       (4 reviews)

    Submitted

  7. Heretic and Hexen engine source code

    This is the source code of Heretic and Hexen by Raven Software, originally released in January 1999 under a restrictive EULA, and eventually re-released under the GNU Public Licence (GPL) version 2 in 2008.

    The original Raven site for the source code has gone away. The re-licensed software was uploaded to Source- Forge which is at risk of disappearing. This upload is to ensure the ongoing preservation of this historically important release, on a mirrored source, the accepted home of Doom/Heretic/Hexen-related stuff.

    13 downloads

       (8 reviews)

    Submitted

  8. FraggleScript standalone source code

    This is the original FraggleScript source that I found on my hard drive. I originally developed it separately; it was later integrated into SMMU. This may be useful to anyone who wants a standalone version of FraggleScript.

    Various features found inside Doom are missing here; for example, there is no "separate script" capability. Features that are missing were added to the language after its integration into Doom. If needed they will have to be backported.

    I have made some minor fixes to this to make it compile under modern gcc. More information is found inside origdoc.txt

    8 downloads

       (7 reviews)

    Submitted

  9. Doom source code, under the GNU GPL

    This is a copy of the source code for DOOM's executable, v1.10 (public release version). This source code was initially released under the DOOM license in 1997, but then dual licensed (DOOM/GPL) in 1997 to encourage transparency in the development of ports and extensions of the DOOM game engines. A copy of the source under the DOOM license may be obtained at id Software's FTP, or at one of its mirrors on /idgames in the /idstuff/source directory.

    251 downloads

       (239 reviews)

    Submitted

  10. SvStrife source

    The source of svstrife is completly idenical to Prboom's source, so if you have compiled Prboom's source before, then, compiling svstrife shouldn't be a problem. Everything should be included for everything to work correctly. SvStrife is based on Prboom version 2.2.3 source.

    5 downloads

       (4 reviews)

    Submitted

  11. SvStrife 1.4

    After the release of Doom's source code in 1998, the source code of Strife was meant to be released as well but it never happened. The source code eventually got lost. Since Strife was originally designed for DOS, Strife wasn't very compatible on WinNT operating systems such as Windows 2000 and XP. SvStrife aims to recreate the Strife game detail by detail while running on Windows 2000 and XP.

    39 downloads

       (37 reviews)

    Submitted

  12. RORDoom

    This was one of the first Doom source ports to feature rooms above rooms capability, simaler to the Build engine.

    11 downloads

       (4 reviews)

    Submitted

  13. WinMBF v2.03 Build 2

    22 downloads

       (21 reviews)

    Submitted

  14. The Eternity Engine Version: 3.31.10

    Eternity is the newest source port to inherit the banner of BOOM. Descended from MBF, it attempts to carry on the effort to put editability, reliability, and compatibility first. From SMMU it also gains the momentum to give the player new options rather than to dictate DOOM purity.

    Eternity includes full BOOM compatibility, as well as most features added in MBF and SMMU. In addition, Eternity adds many more. Check out the extensive documentation package for full information.

    6 downloads

       (4 reviews)

    Submitted

       (3 reviews)

    Submitted

  15. WinMBF v2.03 Build 2 source code

    7 downloads

       (5 reviews)

    Submitted

  16. Eternity Engine v3.31.10 Documentation

    This is documentation for v3.31.10 of the Eternity Engine. Most documentation is in HTML format and can be viewed in your favorite web browser. The Eternity Engine and its source code should be available at the same location you found this archive.

    3 downloads

       (2 reviews)

    Submitted

  17. gledge32-l2.zip

    This is the Gl rendering Edge32 L2 in a version Compiled with Bcc 32 over Tasm52 Assembler.

    It is optimized for Pentium (compatible) processors with L2 cache.

    PII / PIII / PIV and the L2 AMD's.

    It uses Fast internally managed thread storage and is as independend as can be, of W32 system RT components.

    4 downloads

       (1 review)

    Submitted

  18. edge32-l2.zip

    This is the Standard software rendering Edge32 L2 in a version Compiled with Bcc 32 over Tasm52 Assembler.

    It is optimized for Pentium (compatible) processors with L2 cache.

    PII / PIII / PIV and the L2 AMD's.

    It uses Fast internally managed thread storage and is as independend as can be, of W32 system RT components.

    1 download

       (0 reviews)

    Submitted

  19. EDGE DDFs V3.7

    These files are the default configuration files for EDGE which allow it to support Doom, Doom II and Final Doom. These are providd for reference to anyone developing games for EDGE.

    2 downloads

       (1 review)

    Submitted

  20. EDGE WAD for V1.27

    Required engine data file for EDGE V1.27. This is needed for developers in addition to the source code.

    1 download

       (0 reviews)

    Submitted

  21. EDGE v1.27 - Win32 (Win9x/ME/2000/XP) Version

    Spawned from the Doom Engine, EDGE advances into the future with easy development and expansion as a cornerstone, making use of advancing technology on multiple platforms.

    10 downloads

       (9 reviews)

    Submitted

  22. ZDAEMON (v0.96)

    A client/server port for playing DOOM and DOOM II online

    ZDaemon is based on the ZDoom (v1.22) Win32/Linux DOOM port and is a continuation of the csDoom project. It's released under the GNU General Public License and is being developed by NightFang.

    8 downloads

       (6 reviews)

    Submitted

       (1 review)

    Submitted

  23. ZDoom Knowledge Base Compiled Help Format

    This is a set of tutorials for the ZDoom engine. Features full text search of all tutorials.

    4 downloads

       (3 reviews)

    Submitted

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  • File Reviews

    • By galileo31dos01 · Posted
      Done with these settings:   - GLBoom+ 2.5.1.4. complevel 9
      - Ultra-Violence
      - Continuous combined with pistol start mindset.
      - Saves every 10 minutes or so.   This is a slightly improved sequel of a mediocre megawad. It has no story whatsoever, not that it needs one, it's practically designed without an overarching theme and focused on Boom compatibility, something that the prequel didn't communicate very well. Although you rarely see tricks like conveyors and silent teleports put to specific purposes, they're mostly for the atmosphere. A couple of maps use custom colormaps in particular setpieces. One is to simulate immersion in toxic, and the other in blood, or perhaps portals to hell?. Anyway, Community Chest 2 has some nice visuals using stock textures. While not every map looks great, a bunch are simply awe-inspiring because of the author's creativity. I dig the idea in "Death Mountain", the sinuous terrain with mounds everywhere is very neat, as it's theoretically a mountain floating in the air. My only gripe is the trees are placed to get stuck in. Other locations are plain techbases, brown caverns, wooden complexes, Inferno-styled hell and unknown places. Most of the music available are tracks from other wads and games, with only one self-made piece for map 24 by the same author, an amazing melody by the way. I would suggest to add your own tracks for the maps lacking them, for a stronger experience if it helps.   For those who have played the prequel first, and I'm sure everyone did, there are quite a few familiar names to be found, some of which contributed with more than one map. Gene Bird cooked around five for example, evoking a conservative "rooms with monsters" 90's style. His maps don't vary in any aspect to each other, nor to his previous works in Community Chest 1 unfortunately, but they blend well enough with the tone of the mapset. The first map is already by Erik Alm in his well-known Scythe fashion. Then we have individual entries from Andy Leaver, Kaiser and Use3d, the latter came as an improvement to be honest. On the other hand, a big portion of the people involved were completely new to me, and that's when I had to expect the unexpected, sort of. I'd say the maps had their ups and downs, generally enjoyable if some exceptions. They were also organized in a very random way, but that's no news. Just like a traditional community project, this megawad features a wide range of concepts, layouts, and forms to entertain the player, for better or worse. Fans of old-school and/or adventure maps will be delighted, as there are a lot of them in all sizes and difficulties, even several inspired by the original Doom levels. The obvious standout is "The Mucus Flow", a brutal map that can only be understood with patience and dedication, mostly the former one, and heavy chainsaw practicing. Besides, its curvy "mint-chocolate" design is beautiful and unique, or used to be, since tons of future releases found inspiration from it (e.g. Speed of Doom). A shame it has glitches in the sky. There are other remarkable moments to be experienced, such as to explore a city in depth to figure out the secret exit, or to fall in a sequence of fake exits that only exposes you in circles of chaingunners. I'm not sure how others will take it, but I couldn't hold my laugh after the second time.   Secret-wise, the first thing to know is that PRBoom users need to activate the "Linedefs w/o tags apply locally" option to enable access to some ZDoom-only secrets in maps 06 and 24. There is also a secret in map 20 that requires an archvile jump, but it's not possible to reach it outside of ZDoom versions. Other than those, hope your sense of exploration is wide awake, as there is plenty to locate and highly appreciate. I'm thinking of the standout map, of course. For favourite maps I will pick 19, 24, 27, and 31. Some others like 06, 13, 23 and 32 were entertaining for the most part, but not convincing as a whole. The rest range from good to dull or tedious, like the final map.    Overall, it's certainly an upgrade in quality, and I'm inclined to believe the successors are much better. Still, it's nice to traverse the history of the community chest projects. If you and I share similar tastes, then you'll probably find content to enjoy here, and if not, well, skip the unnecessary. My rate is 6/10.  
    • By tempdecal.wad · Posted
      It's bad because it's hard.
    • By Nems · Posted
      Should have been called "Doom 64 for Boom".   I really wanted to like this more. I mean, I do like it but I feel like the gripes I have regarding it just bring my overall rating for it down too much.   It was interesting to see how, at first, the authors recreated the Doom 64 levels in Doom 2 with just vanilla assets. You can still see some of that in the Boom levels like how revenants and arch-viles are used in place of where traps where. That was an interesting touch and I liked that.   As I got further into it though and more of the Boom tricks were used my thoughts wandered from "hey this is a nice vanilla interpretation" to "man I could be playing Doom 64 EX or Doom 64 Retribution". I really wish they would have stuck with vanilla constraints for this reinterpretation. I would have liked to see how they would have handed nightmare monster placement (would a nightmare imp be worth two imps or three, for example). I feel like using Boom and DeHacked cheapened the experience, like they were trying to replicate Doom 64 as close as possible rather than doing a vanilla Doom (2) interpretation.   Additionally, map 30 can fuck right the hell off with that puzzle bullshit.   Anyway, if you don't mind any of the complaints I made, you'll likely have fun with this. I got some fun out of this as well but to me it feels like it's trying to be exactly like Doom 64 rather than simply a vanilla Doom 2 interpretation of Doom 64. In trying to be exactly like Doom 64, it just makes me want to play that more than this.
    • By Marlamir · Posted
      Pretty good. The combat was fun and design wasn't bad at all.
    • By Meril · Posted
      Despite its age, nice details and well designed. Way how blue key is hidden is really clever. But map is dark and cramped. Enemies are only imps and hitscanners.
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