Binary Space Partition builder (BSP) 1.1

   (4 reviews)
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Author

Colin Reed, Dylan Cuthbert

About This File

The first stable version of BSP, version 1.1: written by Colin Reed and converted to GO32 by Dylan Cuthbert. This build dates to April 11, 1994, and was found by ConSiGno on http://cd.textfiles.com/. This version of BSP was recommended by the authors of BSP, unlike the TC version.

Credits

ConSiGno, Colin Reed, Dylan Cuthbert.

Bugs

[From BSP11X.TXT] A known problem is a conflict between the GO32 dos extender and QEMM's DPMI... put 'set GO32=nodpmi' in your autoexec.bat to avoid problems.




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Csonicgo

  • 5
   1 of 1 member found this review helpful 1 / 1 member
A true testament to the Doom community's ingenuity. Doom wasn't even six months old, and it already had a fully-working suite of community-designed editing tools, with BSP generation being the final puzzle to be solved. This very exe launched a revolution in the community and what was expected of future PC games. LEGENDARY.
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  • 5
  
Csonicgo speaks truth

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  • File Reviews

    • By Scotty · Posted
      Absolutely top notch. Fun to explore, great combat, and amazing to see how this incredibly intricate level unwraps itself as you progress. Vanilla compatibility just makes it even more impressive.
    • By NuMetalManiak · Posted
      we need more good Ultimate Doom wads. this was nice, plasma gun combat at first, when it opens up, it's chaotically good. the three keys weren't that hard to figure out, although the puzzle for the red key stands out the most. some nice and sharp (yes) ideas overall.
    • By NaturalTvventy · Posted
      Xaser mastery of the highest order, demonstrating his command of architecture, texturing, (sharp) angles, lighting, and mood.
    • By NuMetalManiak · Posted
      well, combat may not be so bad, but there's a surprising lack of variety. this starts off in a mostly pistol-oriented map, where you get a chaingun at the end, and then the next two maps are moderately long. the final three maps can put some of the ones from Eternal Doom to shame, with some puzzling to do, some of it actually more frustrating than I would be led to expect. there's many dubious design decisions that simply must be pointed out. the final secret area in MAP02, what the FUCK? and another secret area in MAP05 with crushers whose sole purpose is to troll you. MAP06 is the best map in a number of ways, feels eerie, has lots of things to it (oh, and lots of items for the item count for each of the maps too). but one particular switch (Linedef 4962) does not work. I actually felt more and more frustrated the more and more I played this, it wasn't challenging, but it sure got me annoyed with how things were laid out.
    • By Jayextee · Posted
      I have rated this three stars.

      However, I feel like this megaWAD often gets overlooked despite what it is: a part of history. I came to it late, pretty much 1999/2000-ish, and was my first megaWAD personally, but I was always entranced by what I understood to be the story behind it; in a scene utterly dominated by the IBM PC-compatibles/DOS crowd and their (relative) wealth of tools, Macintosh DOOMers came together to show that they too can put together a full-length campaign for Doom II that wasn't going to let those DOS guys totally steal the show.

      And they did. Kind of. With the apparently-unstable-at-best HellMaker crashing every single-figure number of minutes at times, a handful of eager mappers (including the still-active-at-time-of-writing Steve Duff), some of which were authoring their first ever maps, delivered an experience that is to me as interesting as it is varied; in terms of both experience and quality, I have to admit. There are some poor maps here (Sewers, by Jim Bagrow - I'm looking right at you) but there are some epic adventures rivalling those of TNT: Evilution, if not aesthetically (hey, some of them come close) then in length and spectacle.

      What you're getting here is almost like a hidden piece of history that I feel stands proudly as an underdog with its peers. An underdog that isn't always well-behaved (many maps can be rendered uncompletable with the wrong actions taken, including one of the secret maps if you dare enter the basement without the three keys) but at its best (which is usually the maps by Rob Berkowitz or Duff himself) is an entertaining and oft-neglected slice of '90s mapping.