Cave Complex

   (5 reviews)
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Author

Yummy Pie

About This File

Large gothic/hell theme cave style map with multiple paths and branching areas.

Screenshots - https://i.imgur.com/fZClmnA.jpg

Credits

Bzzrak Ktazzz's MDK Skies Pack - https://www.doomworld.com/idgames/graphics/mdkskies

Baker's Legacy Texture Pack - http://www.realm667.com/index.php/en/texture-stock-mainmenu-152-97360/heretic-hexen-style-mainmenu-154-49305

Base

New from scratch

Build Time

3 months (after several different versions)

Editors Used

Doom Builder (UDMF)

Bugs

It might be possible to fall in between some pillars and get stuck.




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an_mutt

  • 2
   4 of 4 members found this review helpful 4 / 4 members

As much as I enjoyed playing this map, the requirement of playing the wad in an advanced port which supports UDMF is pretty baffling to me, as it could very easily be simplified down to Vanilla or Boom while losing basically nothing. The only things I could recognise were a few out of place stealth imps (which aren't inherently bad, but are poorly utilised here), along with some scripting at the end of the map for one particular fight. Otherwise, this map could easily be part of any given old-school vanilla mapset and I wouldn't bat an eyelid.

 

One aspect of this 'old-school' feel is the texturing, and the fact that Yummy Pie goes for the almost Wolfenstein 3D-esque approach of having most areas have their own wallpaper of a single texture throughout, and a few supporting texture variants for detail. This works for most parts of the map, with the exception of the opening area - its use of brick being too repetitive and garish, and making me wish that some different textures were also incorporated to support said bricks visually. The 'old-school' feel is also enforced by the fairly ordinary architecture within the map - the most dynamic changing of architecture you're going to see here is some doors being opened and a few blocks being raised out of lava. While this isn't a problem, it does continue to raise the question of why the mapper would choose UDMF as their map format of choice if they aren't going to experiment with what UDMF is capable of. Because of this, the map feels very safe, artistically - too by-the-numbers.

 

Some final points about this map, and keeping on the topic of it feeling too safe: the monster placement and general gameplay progression also falls into this same feel. The map is quite nicely paced, with gameplay difficulty ramping up at points where it feels like it should, and the map ending at a satisfying point. (it doesn't end too abruptly, or go on for too long once you feel you've experienced everything it has to offer) This is definitely the strongest part of the map's design. Unfortunately, the final areas is too by-the-numbers and generic as a final boss fight that things go from "natural" to "predictable" once you reach the final areas. As for the map's 'multiple paths and branching areas', it was not something I particularly picked up on until reading the wad's description after the fact. While there were multiple areas that had some additional areas, they usually amounted to single off-shoot rooms or pathways that gave me either a few monsters to fight, or some goodies to pick up. Again, unfortunately, it feels very safe. It would be interesting to see the mapper move into some more experimental non-linear design, if they're interested in including it in their maps going forward.

 

Lastly, I felt that the final baron "fight" was laughably bad, and I simply sunk 40 cells into it before leaving. For some reason it's not a scripted fight, and I can just lower the bars to avoid it and walk into the exit. Once again, this raises questions on the use of UDMF, as the fight before this does use scripting for what is essentially a very similar fight, fundamentally speaking (kill a thing, then be allowed to leave). The baron encounter is a strong sign that a similar approach could have been made in the previous fight too. Again: baffling.

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Mason.

  • 3
   2 of 2 members found this review helpful 2 / 2 members

Not awful, but nothing too exciting either. Simply average.

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Zalewa

· Edited by Zalewa

  • 4
   1 of 2 members found this review helpful 1 / 2 members

Some good stuff here. The level consists of an elaborate cave system with geometry that can be described as an entangled web of beads. There's also a swastika look-alike in north-eastern corner of the map.

 

The layout doesn't belong to the non-confusing ones, but it's nevertheless manageable. When reaching some points, you will be provided a convenient way of arriving at the next point-of-interest, Skyrim style. Action is constant, with some moderate switch hunting. Nothing too bad. Difficulty is also moderate.

 

Visuals are brown and gray then some more brown and gray plus some extra colors other than brown and gray here and there, with sufficient amount of detail to not suffocate you with all that brown and gray.

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wolfie3dfan

  • 5
   1 of 4 members found this review helpful 1 / 4 members

Very nice map. I would play more from this author.

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NuMetalManiak

  • 3
  

it's an alright level, cramped as most cave levels can be, combat is alright and layout actually is nonlinear for the most part. a few traps, like the three-door room, and the god-awful crusher area (please never do this newbie mappers), everything else is pretty much alright in my book. i don't care about the map format.

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  • File Reviews

    • By EmotionalFelineinaMadstate · Posted
      When a Doom mod causes controversy, mixed feelings, and making a dev of a certain port angry, you'll bet i'll give it a good score.   Not saying because it caused controversy, it has a good score. It was a weird trip to go through, and is a really neat idea, but of course, a star had to be removed, due to my headaches and immeasurable pain this thing gave me.   Love and hate you, anotak.
    • By SegaDoomer1223 · Posted
      This is so useful, I ain't used to play a lot using source port so this is one big useful thing for me as I only wanted to have WASD movement with mouse movement. I also got the newest version of the Doom games from GOG and I tweaked it thanks to PhilsComputerLab's tutorial. I play DeathMaches a lot on vanilla doom fullscreen using DOSBox so thank you Istvan Pasaki
    • By SegaDoomer1223 · Posted
      It doesn't work I tried many times.....
    • By NuMetalManiak · Posted
      invulnerabilities are great to have in a slaughtermap. there were a few troll moments but otherwise it's fine.
    • By Jonathan · Posted
      The Sky May Be gets called the worst WAD ever, while this is feted with awards... What the hell's wrong with this community!?   Kidding.   After so many years of refinement and improvement in editors' skills, a lot of Doom maps are so exquisitely crafted that it's almost too much. Like admiring some ornate Gothic church, there's a part of your brain that rebels against the perfection on display, and wants something messier and uglier. Lilith.pk3 is, in its own way, just as intricately made as those other maps, except the craft is directed towards making something more experimental, corrupted and obtuse. Sprites, textures, music and sounds are all heavily modified, and engine bugs leveraged, to create the impression of a game world that is twisted and wrecked beyond repair. That player must navigate through a colourfully discordant environment that both does and does not conform to their expectations of a typical Doom game.   The mod's aesthetic is not totally unprecedented, either in Doom modding, wider gaming, or art in general. Glitch art, as the style is known, has enjoyed some success over the past few years, purposefully employing the kind of analogue and digital corruption that occasionally affects regular media for stylistic effect. The same criticism that could be levelled at glitch might also be raised here: that it is style over substance. When you strip away the confrontational aesthetic, is there anything left? E.g. would you play these levels if they were presented in a more conventional manner?   I would argue that, on balance, there is. While the gameplay is not quite as daring or original as the presentation it's wrapped up in, there are some cool ideas there. And the aesthetic is used to enhance these ideas, not disguise them. Towards the end, it does become a little needlessly frustrating, as the player must dance around moving and frozen projectiles over a series tiny platforms in a damaging floor. After reloading for the umpteenth time, you may wonder exactly why you're bothering to continue. But overall, lilith.pk3 admirably achieves what it sets out to do, and is well worth your time. Even if it ultimately turns you off, we should be glad that the Doom community still produces work as different and challenging as this.