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MrBoomer

Is there a modern doom modding tutorial?

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I'm interested in learning how to mod Doom, but the problem is that there isn't nothing new and relevant to teach me how to do this. I looked on the ZDOOM wiki and I found some tutorials that pointed me out to the "Unoffical WAD designers' handbook" and the "DOOM editing getting started guide." I haven't read too far into the latter mentioned guide, but I noticed it talks about archaic doom engines like BOOM, and other software that might not be used anymore. Is there a more updated guide for learning the basics of doom modding, or should these be suffice for a more modern doom modding experience?

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6 minutes ago, MrBoomer said:

Is there a more updated guide for learning the basics of doom modding, or should these be suffice for a more modern doom modding experience?

 

Well, as far as I know there is no United Guide of modern Doom modding, but you MUST learn how to edit Classic Doom (Doom, Boom formats), when next - you can use advanced engine like UDMF. So, at first time try to create levels for Doom/Boom format. When you'll get the idea - try UDMF.

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36 minutes ago, DeXiaZ said:

So, at first time try to create levels for Doom/Boom format. When you'll get the idea - try UDMF.

 

I apologize for my ignorance, but I can only pretend to understand what you're saying. What is the difference between a BOOM and a UDMF format? I understand that UDMF is a standard map format for most developers, but what makes it different from the older BOOM format? 

 

16 minutes ago, Gez said:

There was this one for ZDoom UDMF modding:
 https://eev.ee/blog/2015/12/19/you-should-make-a-doom-level-part-1/

Thanks for pointing this out. This actually looks like a pretty friendly and easy to understand guide to use.

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Posted (edited)
13 minutes ago, MrBoomer said:

 

I understand that UDMF is a standard map format for most developers, but what makes it different from the older BOOM format? 

 

UDMF allows to define additional flags and parameters directly on sectors / linedefs, rather than having to use dummy line specials for that, this can make mapping a lot less painful.

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UDMF offers more options and flexibility but with more options comes more responsibility.

 

That's why it's best to map for classic first so you have a basic understanding of how DOOM mapping works, how to place things, how to detail in your own style, and so on.

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1 hour ago, MrBoomer said:

I apologize for my ignorance, but I can only pretend to understand what you're saying. What is the difference between a BOOM and a UDMF format? I understand that UDMF is a standard map format for most developers, but what makes it different from the older BOOM format? 

 

Ok, lets start from simple things.

 

Map formats. VERY SIMPLIFYED. I mean, I will ignore a lot of moments to create an easy explanation for you.

1) Vanilla Doom from 1993-1994. You can create maps like in the original Doom games. But you're totally limited about sizes, quantity of monsters and quality of details.

2) Boom. 1997-1999. With this format you can create big sized classic Doom levels with much more details and some advanced features.

3) ZDoom. 1999-... With this format you can do things you have seen in Duke Nukem 3D, for example. Mirrors, video cameras, 3D floor imitations, slopes instead of ladders, you can also create cutscenes and some specially programmed things, events.

4) "GZDoom". I mean, UDMF. Same as ZDoom, but...realtime floor reflections, vertical and horizontal portals like you've seen in Portal games, absolute 3D floors (room over room), dynamic lighting...what else...

 

The best answer is:

4 minutes ago, CARRiON said:

That's why it's best to map for classic first so you have a basic understanding of how DOOM mapping works, how to place things, how to detail in your own style, and so on.

 

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2 hours ago, MrBoomer said:

I noticed it talks about archaic doom engines like BOOM, and other software that might not be used anymore.

Good thing the ZDoom wiki is so wonderfully unbiased that it considers the format "boom", which is still being used for community projects these days, as "archaic" while also being 100% wrong about it not being used anymore.

 

If you wanna get into mapping, you pick whichever map you liked the most, figure out what format it is made with, and then you look at how stuff has been done. If it turns out that the map in question is made in UDMF and relies on scripting a great deal, then you're gonna need to learn how to employ scripts (ACS or ZScript) when you need to. What's most important for the time being is learning how linedef actions work, what they can and can't do and how you can employ these actions to create a map that plays properly and works reliably. When you have identified what basic linedef actions are good at and what they suck at, you can look into more "advanced" stuff like scripting if that is your thing and if you really need that sort of stuff to begin with.

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1 hour ago, Nine Inch Heels said:

Good thing the ZDoom wiki is so wonderfully unbiased that it considers the format "boom", which is still being used for community projects these days, as "archaic" while also being 100% wrong about it not being used anymore.

The ZDoom wiki does not say or even imply such things. In fact, you can check it for yourself.

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1 hour ago, DeXiaZ said:

 

Ok, lets start from simple things.

 

Map formats. VERY SIMPLIFYED. I mean, I will ignore a lot of moments to create an easy explanation for you.

1) Vanilla Doom from 1993-1994. You can create maps like in the original Doom games. But you're totally limited about sizes, quantity of monsters and quality of details.

2) Boom. 1997-1999. With this format you can create big sized classic Doom levels with much more details and some advanced features.

3) ZDoom. 1999-... With this format you can do things you have seen in Duke Nukem 3D, for example. Mirrors, video cameras, 3D floor imitations, slopes instead of ladders, you can also create cutscenes and some specially programmed things, events.

4) "GZDoom". I mean, UDMF. Same as ZDoom, but...realtime floor reflections, vertical and horizontal portals like you've seen in Portal games, absolute 3D floors (room over room), dynamic lighting...what else...

 

 

This makes a lot more sense now. I get why it's best to learn basic DOOM mapping now, and I thought this whole time you should learn only the newest engines and formats lol

 

 

1 hour ago, CARRiON said:

UDMF offers more options and flexibility but with more options comes more responsibility.

 

That's why it's best to map for classic first so you have a basic understanding of how DOOM mapping works, how to place things, how to detail in your own style, and so on.

 

This gave me a better idea of where to start, thanks

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Boom is basically the default format and is in no way archaic.  Check YouTube for tutorials.

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