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fruitbowl

DoomEd not working on NeXTSTEP 3.3

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Hey there, ever since Romero released the source code and the map compiler for the original Doom i have tried making it run on an nextcube that runs Motorola 68040 on an Intel 80486, but everytime i try to fire up DoomEd i get an error message saying "This application doesen't contain software for this kind of computer." I'm not sure if wether i was doing something wrong or i didn't copy all the files over properly, or they just need to be in specific paths, eitherway any help would truly be appreciated!

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It looks to me like DoomEd was ported to Mac OS X, but not Windows, (though that may not be true) which might mean that it's an OS specific program. I can't, however, be sure because I have no way to test it myself. Fortunately, according to the Doom Wiki, the best person to ask is probably @fraggle, since it not only says he's doing the port, but provides a link for it.

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Back in the 80s, Steve Jobs designed the Macintosh for Apple. In the 90's, he was kicked out of Apple, so he started the NeXT company, which wasn't the huge success he was hoping for. Later, Apple was having a hard time, so they invited Steve Jobs back, and he got the company back on its feet. NeXTSTEP is more of a cousin to the Mac than an ancestor.

 

What really puzzles me is you say you have a Motorola processor on an Intel processor. What does that even mean? Emulation?

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They did actually use NeXTSTEP as the basis for OS X in about 2000(?) when they were rebuilding the OS to correct the serious shortcomings of OS 9, which I believe is what he's referring to. There was also a period when Apple were considering buying "Be Inc" and using BeOS as their starting point instead.

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"Motorola 68040 on an Intel 80486" seems like a contradiction so I'm confused what actual hardware you're using here (or is this emulated?)

 

The error you're getting suggests you're maybe using a binary compiled for the wrong CPU architecture. NeXTStep ran on 68000 and x86 machines so maybe you're mixing these up somehow. Since the source is available you should be able to recompile but you might need to change some build options.

 

Actual NeXT hardware (as used by id) was 68000-based so if you're trying to use something built for that on an x86 machine that would explain why.

 

1 hour ago, Empyre said:

 NeXTSTEP is more of a cousin to the Mac than an ancestor.

I wouldn't agree -  it's definitely more than just a cousin. Check out the MacOS Rhapsody release from 1998 which is a halfway evolution of NeXTStep into MacOS - it's essentially NS with a Mac look and feel, before the new Aqua style was added.

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Good! Now, new details of the story are known to me. Like I said recently, I love learning new things.

 

The only time I messed with a Mac was back in the 80s. There were a couple of them in the back of the college computer lab, which was full of PS/2s. Actually, I am not sure about the PS/2s. They might still have been PCs, and PS/2s came later. I tried playing around with one of the Macs, but I couldn't do much because I didn't know about double-clicking. A year or so later, Windows came around and I then I got some experience with a mouse.

 

Are Macs still using one-button mice?

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Just now, fruitbowl said:

i have tried making it run on an nextcube that runs Motorola 68040 on an Intel 80486,

So you tried to compile it for m68040 and tried to run it on a 486? Well that is probably the problem... try compiling for 486 and running it then and see if it works

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3 hours ago, Empyre said:

Are Macs still using one-button mice?

No. Apple mice have supported right clicking since the Mighty Mouse (2005), though right-click support has been part of the OS ever since the switch to Mac OS X in the late 90s. The more recent Magic Mouse supports right clicking as well as multi-touch gestures like you'd find on a laptop touchpad. The touchpads on Mac laptops let you right click by clicking with two fingers.

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5 hours ago, fraggle said:

No. Apple mice have supported right clicking since the Mighty Mouse (2005), though right-click support has been part of the OS ever since the switch to Mac OS X in the late 90s. The more recent Magic Mouse supports right clicking as well as multi-touch gestures like you'd find on a laptop touchpad. The touchpads on Mac laptops let you right click by clicking with two fingers.

 

That said, software built around a PC mouse is awkward to use on a mac trackpad (like eureka)

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2 hours ago, Jon said:

 

That said, software built around a PC mouse is awkward to use on a mac trackpad (like eureka)

Well trackpads are usually worse to use than mice anyway so that isnt really much of a surprise

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2 hours ago, therektafire said:

Well trackpads are usually worse to use than mice anyway so that isnt really much of a surprise

 

It depends what you are doing and what you are used to. But having fundamental operations on RMB or middle-click is much more common on UNIX/Linux software than Mac software, because it's much easier with a 3 button+ mouse than with simulated double or middle-click on a Mac.

 

(I once beat Quake 3: Arena on the hardest difficulty setting, in SP, using the trackpoint on a Thinkpad X40)

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