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RileyXY1

25 Years Of Doom Retrospective

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This is a new section I am doing, as I celebrate 25 years since Doom's release. I am going to review what I think is the best wad from every year Doom map making has been active, going from 1994 all the way to 2018. This is Part 1: 1994. The WAD I will be reviewing is Aliens TC.

 

About Aliens TC

 

Aliens TC was a total conversion mod for Doom. No, it was the very first total conversion mod ever made. It was made by Justin Fisher and, as the name implies, it was based on the Aliens movies. The WAD has heavy emphasis on atmosphere. The first level was completely devoid of enemies, a sharp contrast to the fast paced action one would normally find in Doom. There were no advanced source ports at the time, so Justin Harris had to make this with what technology was available to him at the time. For example, to create the alien hives, he took the various hell textures from the base Doom and recolored them dark green to make it look like alien slime, then took the strung up corpses from various wall textures to make them look like cocooned victims. Justin even extracted some sound clips from the original movie to add extra flair to the levels. The wad has eleven levels. All levels were made by Fisher except for the secret level, which was instead made by his friend Richard Love. The main campaign replaces the entirety of Episode 2. There are also two bonus levels that replace the first two levels of Episode 3. One was an extremely hard area that was removed from E2M5 because the level had gotten too large and the other was a copy of E2M1 except populated with monsters.

 

Impact & Later Projects By The Creator

 

Aliens TC had a very large impact, being the first ever Total Conversion mod for Doom ever. On Doom newsgroups, there was more discussion about Aliens TC than Doom 2. Dreamworks was impressed by the project and offered Fisher a spot on the team that would make Trespasser. Fisher declined, wanting to finish his university degree. He would later make a modified version of the WAD for Doom 2. Many other WAD creators would be inspired by the Aliens movies,most notably the ZDoom project Aliens: Colonial Marines (not to be confused with the GearBox game of the same name). Fisher would only create one project after this, a tech demo called Nemisis Experiment.

Edited by RileyXY1

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This is the second part of my 25 years of Doom retrospective, where I look back at what I think is the best WAD from each year Doom map making was active, from 1994 all the way to 2018. This is Part 2: 1995. This WAD I will be reviewing is The Lost Episodes of Doom.

 

About The Lost Episodes of Doom

 

The Lost Episodes of Doom is a full 3 episode nine level each replacement wad for the original Doom, created by Christen Klie and Bob Carter. It was one of a few WADs released a commercial product, which it was released as a 3.5'' floppy disc that came with a book detailing the levels. The levels take place on Jupiter's moons: Callisto, and Io, and then on Jupiter itself. Most of the levels were taken from earlier projects that Klie and Carter worked on.

 

Later Projects By The Creators

Christen Klie would later contribute six levels to the Master Levels for Doom 2 project: Catwalk, Combine, Fistula, Garrison, Subspace, and Subterra. He was later hired by LucasArts and would contribute to Outlaws and the Rogue Squadron series, among other projects. Bob Carter has not worked on any other notable projects.

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This is my section where I review one WAD released from each year from 1994 all the way to 2018. This is Part 3: 1996. The WAD I will be covering is Memento Mori 2.

 

About Memento Mori 2

Memento Mori 2 was a megawad and a sequel to the original Memento Mori (Memento Mori means "remember you will die" in Latin). The WAD contains 32 maps plus 2 top secret ones that can only be found through the infopack. The infopack itself contains fun little mission briefings for all the levels. A similar infopack was also created for the original. Due to a missing patch, the WAD was unable to function on Mac computers. A fixed version was later released.

 

Where are its creators now?

Memento Mori 2 has several notable creators. Matthias Worch made four levels for Memento Mori 2 and also contributed four more levels for Requiem, as well as developing a solo project called The Trooper's Playground. He now works for Hangar 13 Games as the Design Director. Adam Williamson contributed to both Memento Mori 2 and Requiem. He also contributed to the Hacx total conversion and holds several Doom speedrunning records. Orin Flaharty also contributed to Requiem as well as Memento Mori 1. He also made several solo projects. Adam Windsor is a prolific Doom map creator, contributing to many projects on top of Memento Mori 2, including the Demonfear series, Requiem, STRAIN, The Darkening 1 and 2, Alien Vendetta, Community Chest 4, 100 Lines, and Doom 2 In Name Only. Stephen Watson would later contribute to both Hacx and Insertion. Jen Nielsen previously worked on Memento Mori 1 and would later contribute to Requiem. He also made 2 solo projects. Mark Klem would contribute soundtracks to a number of Doom WADS, including Memento Mori 1 and 2, STRAIN, Requiem, Cringe, and GothicDM 1 and 2. David "Tolwyn" Shaw also contributed to almost all of the WADs that Mark Klem contributed to (with the exceptions of Cringe and Memento Mori 1). Tolwyn would also contribute to Icarus: Alien Vanguard, Bloodlands, Grievance, and Pursuit, among others. Tolwyn also has his own website where you can freely download his music to use in your own WADS. Recently, Tolwyn and Klem, alongside Jeremy Doyle, created Requiem: Reimagined, a remix album featuring rearrangements of the music from Requiem.

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This is my section where I review one WAD released in every year from 1994 to 2018 to celebrate the 25th anniversary of Doom's release. This is Part 4: 1997. I had a hard time picking which WAD to cover, because there were so many great WADs released in that year. So, I decided that, for the only time in this series, I am covering two WADs. The WADs I'll be covering are Requiem and Hell Revealed.

 

About Requiem

Requiem is a full 32 level megawad. The project was managed by Chris Thornton. This WAD was viewed during its development as "the last great megawad", as the creators thought that Doom would become "obsolete" due to the then recent release of Quake. The alleged slow death of Doom that motivated the project led to a hindered development cycle. The project spent so much time with four levels missing that Thornton decided that he would either release the WAD incomplete or cancel it outright (it is still unknown what he intended to do) requiring Adam Windsor to contribute three levels originally intended for the Demonfear series and make a rather small MAP32.

 

Where are Requiem's creators now?

To avoid regurgitating info from the Memento Mori 2 section, I'm only going to list off people who did not work on that WAD. Anthony Czerwonka would contribute heavily to STRAIN as well as the GothicDM series. The gothic textures that he created have been used in many Doom 2 WADs over the years. Iikka Keränen was a frequent collaborator with Czerwonka and was voted the best level maker in Doomworld's 5 Years of Doom celebration. He worked on Hacx and the GothicDM series, among others. He now works at Valve Software. Jeremy Doyle would compose music tracks for various WADs, including Icarus: Alien Vanguard, Osiris, THT: Threnody, and TNT: Revilution.

 

About Hell Revealed

Hell Revealed is a full 32 level megawad. The WAD is known for its extreme difficulty. It is also one of the few PWADs allowed to be used in Compet-n speedruns. The soundtrack for the WAD is taken from the 1994 game Rise of The Triad, although some maps use the regular Doom 2 music. Donner and Niv also planned to update the WAD with an original soundtrack, although this never materialized. A sequel was later released in 2003, made by a new team with Donner's approval.

 

Where are Hell Revealed's creators now?

Hell Revealed was made by two people: Yonatan Donner and Haggay Niv. Donner would contribute two levels to TeamTNT's deathmatch WAD Pursuit and has submitted over 270 speedrunning demos to the Doomed Speed Demos Archive. Niv has not worked on any other notable projects.

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This is the next installment of my series, where I cover one WAD released in every year Doom modding has been active, from 1994 all the way to 2018. This is Part 5: 1998. The WAD I will covering in this episode is Cyberdreams.

 

About Cyberdreams

Cyberdreams is a 32 map megawad. This WAD focuses on Cyberdemons. However, the player only has their pistol and fists for the entirety of the WAD, forcing them to utilize teleporters, crushers, etc. to dispatch the Cyberdemons and avoid getting killed by the rockets. It is a very puzzle-based WAD. 

 

My Own Thoughts On Cyberdreams

Cyberdreams is a rather unconventional WAD. As one of the earliest puzzle WADs, the levels are very creative and require a decent level of understanding in order to defeat the Cyberdemons. It got me interested in these sort of WADs and now there's an entire Cacoward set aside to honor these types of WADs: the Machaward.

 

About the creators?

Cyberdreams was created by Gonzalo Pèrez de la Ossa and Albert Valls. Neither have worked on any notable projects.

Edited by RileyXY1

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Have you considered writing for the wiki? It seems like the content you're writing might fit better there. Your writing seems very factual and objective (fitting with the encyclopedic style of the wiki), and it might be nice to put together a "25 years of WADs"-type retrospective article (eg. brief descriptions linking off to other articles) - as far as I know the Doom wiki isn't currently planning anything for the 25th anniversary in December.

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For the sake of being constructive, let me say that I do appreciate the idea of a retrospective series! I always love to read about the impact that games had on particular individuals within their contemporary contexts, and I'd love to see you write from that perspective.

 

As it is though, as evidenced by @fraggle merging all of your posts into one...All of your retrospective installments combined roughly equate to the length I would have expected from a single installment of your series.

 

Instead of focusing so heavily on presenting objective information about each of these WADs, why not give us a little bit of your own perspective? When did you first play them? What sort of impact or influence did they have on you as a person, or a gamer, or a designer, etc? When you first discovered Cyberdreams, did it expand your horizons and challenge your perception of what a Doom wad could achieve? What sort of conclusion can you draw from the impact that WAD may have had on the community at large?

 

RileyXY1, I appreciate the idea of what you are doing, but I think my best advice would be to just take a little more time to think about what value you are adding to the community with your writing and maybe to give each of your installments a bit of room to breathe. You don't need to present us with objective information about these WADs several times a day, because we already know those things and can easily look them up in the DoomWiki. I care way more about your interpretation of these creations from your own point of view.

 

I hope this doesn't discourage you from writing, but I feel it had to be said.

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I also read all the entries so far and did enjoy them very much. I am quite new to the Doom community when it comes to mapping and thus don't know anything about the more well known PWADS. It's very interesting and I would like to read more. Emphasis is on the "more" part here. :D

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15 hours ago, fraggle said:

Have you considered writing for the wiki? It seems like the content you're writing might fit better there. Your writing seems very factual and objective (fitting with the encyclopedic style of the wiki), and it might be nice to put together a "25 years of WADs"-type retrospective article (eg. brief descriptions linking off to other articles) - as far as I know the Doom wiki isn't currently planning anything for the 25th anniversary in December.

@RileyXY1This is a great idea, I think! Your series could serve as a great introduction to Doom mods of the years, and putting it into the wiki makes it "official"! Maybe someone could add some screenshots, and you could have like one page for every year, with "<- Back" and "Next ->" links. You knows, maybe it would end up on or near the home page!

 

Regardless, this is a nice concept. You have an easily-approachable, no-nonsense style to your writing, which I very much enjoy.

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This is the next installment of my series, where I cover one WAD released in every year Doom modding has been active, from 1994 all the way to 2018. This is Part 6: 1999. The WAD I will covering in this episode is Assault on Tei Tenga.

 

About Assault on Tei Tenga

Assault on Tei Tenga is a hub based WAD made for ZDoom. It was the first WAD to take advantage of many features provided by the ZDoom engine, such as a hub system (inherited from Hexen) and advanced scripting. At launch, it received mixed reception, with many claiming that the scripting interfered with traditional Doom gameplay. Today, it is considered to be the WAD that got ZDoom on its feet.

 

My Own Opinions on Assault on Tei Tenga

Assault on Tei Tenga stands out amongst the other WADs at the time. Although it is a tech demo for the scripting features for the then-new ZDoom engine, the scripting features added a new level of gameplay and opened the door for many WADs to do the same thing 

 

About the creators?

Assault on Tei Tenga was created by Sam Ketner. He has not worked on any other notable projects.

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Time for the next installment of this retrospective. This is Part 7: 2000. The WAD I will be covering is the 10 Sectors Community Project.

 

About 10 Sectors

10 Sectors was the end result of a community project. The premise was simple: create a WAD using only a mere 10 sectors. It was based on a competition in the Unreal community called the 5 Cubes Competition. Linguica hosted the competition, and Andrew Bassett, Matthew Dixon, Martin Friberg, and Gaston Lahaut served as the judges. Michal Mesko's map "Last Call" was declared the winner, and top 3 maps, 27 runner-ups, and 2 special mention entries were compiled into this WAD. 

 

My Own Opinions About 10 Sectors

10 Sectors is an interesting case. The WADs only have 10 sectors, as per the rules of the project, although all of them feel interesting enough to justify downloading. The limits did not interfere with the gameplay in any way, in my opinion.

 

About the creators?

A lot of people contributed to this community project. They include:

1. Tobias Forsberg: He would later work with Ola Björling on Overload Deathmatches and made a few solo projects. 

2. Kristian Aro: He contributed to 2002: A Doom Odyssey, Death Tormention 3, Brotherhood of Ruin, and the Cacoward winning Whispers of Satan, among other projects.

3. Kurt Kesler: He is known for the KZDoom series of single map WADs as well as Nimrod and Twilight Warrior, among other projects.

4. Mike "Cyb" Watson: He is known for the Massmouth series, as well as Void, Hell Revealed 2, Mock 2: The Speed of Stupid, Community Chest 2, and Congestion 1024, among other projects. He was also the webmaster of Doom Nation, a major Doom news site, until it shut down in 2000. He also runs the humor site Doom, Dammit.

5. Paul Schmitz: He created The Artifact and also contributed to Eternal Doom and Daedalus: Alien Defense.

6. Jonathan Rimmer: He worked on Crucified Dreams as well as other solo projects. He is also a speedrunner and holds several Compet-n records.

7. Jon Dowland: He is most known for his work on Freedoom and Chocolate Doom, but he started by making Doom Legacy mods. 

8. Kristian Käll: He created Phobia and Nimrod and would also contribute to Alien Vendetta. He was also a member of Team Future and contributed to Doom 3: Phobos.

9. Anthony Soto: He contributed to many high profile projects, including Alien Vendetta, The Darkening Episode 2, Crucified Dreams, and GothicDM 2, among other projects.

10. Boris Iwanski: He contributed to the Forgotten Base series and created a number of Freedoom resources. He is also the maintainer of the WADs in Progress website.

11. Yashar Garibzadeh: He contributed to Alien Vendetta, Hell Revealed 2, and Crucified Dreams, among other projects. He is also a speedrunner and holds several Compet-n records.

12. Qingshuo Wang: He made several solo WADs. Most of his WADs were large, medieval levels using the GothicDM textures.

13. Jonas Feragen: He was the leader of the Hell Revealed 2 project and also contributed to Crucified Dreams. He is best known for being the creator of Hissy, a plush Cacodemon.

14. Christopher Lutz: He would later work on Caverns of Darkness, Phobos Anomaly Reborn, Crucified Dreams, Doom the Way id Did, and No End In Sight, among other projects.

15. Lee Szymanski: He worked on The Darkening Episode 2, Alien Vendetta, Congestion 1024, Endgame, and Crucified Dreams, among other projects.

16. Michal Meško: He contributed to GothicDM, Hacx, and Crucified Dreams, among other projects.

17. Wouter van Oortmerssen: He was one of the original founders of the Freedoom project and also created the editor WadC.

Edited by RileyXY1

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After a long absence, this series is finally back for Part 8: 2001. The WAD I'll be covering is Alien Vendetta.

 

About Alien Vendetta

Alien Vendetta is a 32-level megawad that is difficult, but not to the degree of Hell Revealed. Among the highlight levels are a massive Egyptian-themed map (Misri Halek), a massive castle map with a unique design (Blood Sacrifice), a Post Mortem expy (Dark Dome), a hellish castle map with some unique texture work (Stench of Evil), a stone complex with heavy risk-reward gameplay and a high skill ceiling (Hillside Siege), and an Episode 1 style techbase map (Entropy). The music was taken from a variety of games, including Doom, Doom 2, Final Doom, Heretic, Rise of the Triad, Lands of Lore 2, and Duke Nukem 3D, among others, with one original track playing on MAP20. The WAD had two releases, with the second removing MAP25 (Valley of the Echoes), while adding a new MAP24 (Clandenstine Complex), causing the old MAP24 (Demonic Hordes) to be moved to the MAP25 slot. In 2016, an expansion called Alien Vendetta: Black Label was released, adding two additional maps with more modern design elements.

 

Where are the creators now?

To avoid regurgitating info from the 10 Sectors section, I will only be listing people who did not work on that WAD. Anders Johnsen is a speedrunner who holds several Compet-N records. Kim André Malde would later contribute one map to Crucified Dreams. He would sadly pass away in July of 2012. Brad Spencer would later contribute to Hellcore and Back to Saturn X, among other projects. Vincent Catalaá holds several speedrunning records and also contributed to Plutonia 2. Sam Woodman would later contribute to 2002: A Doom Odyssey, Hell Revealed 2, and Plutonia 2, among other projects. He would also contribute the soundtrack to The Darkening Episode 2's second release and he made some tracks for Hell Revealed 2.

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Time to play catch up I guess. This is Part 9: 2002. The WAD I will be covering is 2002: A Doom Odyssey. This is the first time since the 1995 section where I will cover a WAD made for the original Doom.

 

About 2002: A Doom Odyssey

This is a full 4-episode Ultimate Doom replacement WAD made primarily by Paul Corfiatis, who made most of the levels and contributed the WAD's soundtrack. This WAD had a total of 4 different versions. The second modified some maps and added a bonus level that can only be played in a ZDoom based source port. The third fixed the MAPINFO lump, allowing every episode to be completed in ZDoom although it modified some of the secret level exits which led to some gameplay problems. The 10th anniversary release replaced E4M1 with a new map, moved E4M9 to E5M2, moved E3M5 to E4M9, and added a new E3M5. It also fixed the secret exit problems present in the third release.

 

Thoughts on 2002: A Doom Odyssey

2002: A Doom Odyssey is your standard Doom WAD. This WAD doesn't try anything drastic, and it's simplicity helps it in the end.

 

Where Are The Creators Now?

To avoid regurgitating info from the 10 Sectors and Alien Vendetta sections, I am only listing people who did not work on those WADs. Paul Corfiatis had a long and dedicated history with Doom. He also contributed to The Twilight Zone, The Twilight Zone 2, Bella, Bella 2, Death Tormention 3, The 1 Monster Community Project, Community Chest 3, Claustrophobia 1024, Plutonia 2, Whispers of Satan, Doom 2 Unleashed, Plutonia Revisited, Doom The Way Id Did, Community Chest 4, MAYhem 2048, 2048 Unleashed, PSX Doom: The Lost Levels, and THT: Threnody. He is still active, having contributed to Doomworld Mega Project 2017 and several other projects. Vick Bobkov made some solo projects and also contributed to Plutonia 2. Christian Hansen would later contribute to Hellcore and THT: Threnody, among other projects.

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This is Part 10: 2003. For the second time, I will be covering two WADs. The WADs I will be covering are Doom 64 TC, also known as Doom 64: The Absolution, and Scythe.

 

What is Doom 64 TC?

 

Doom 64 TC is a conversion of the 1997 game Doom 64 for the PC, running on the Doomsday engine. This conversion includes all of the maps from the original game, as well as some new ones. Several new monsters were also added. This conversion also received an expansion, called the Outcast Levels, that contained more maps as well as 2 new Demon Keys that provide new effects for the Unmaker. It was replaced by a new Doom 64 conversion called Doom 64 EX, which builds itself from a Doom 64 ROM file using a special program.

 

Where is the creator now?

Doom 64 TC was created by Samuel Villarreal, also known as Kaiser. Kaiser also created Doom 64 EX, as well as the Community is Falling series of jokewads. He also contributed to Community Chest, Community Chest 2, and Plutonia 2. He also created some of the very first PWADs for Strife. He was one of this first Doomers to hack the console versions of Doom, including the PSX, GBA, Jaguar, and N64 versions. He put some levels from those platforms along with two original maps into a compilation WAD called Console Doom. He also modded for Unreal Tournament, Serious Sam, the Quake series, Doom 3, and F.E.A.R. He contributed 3 maps to Doom 3: Last Man Standing. He also worked on the F.E.A.R expansion pack Perseus Mandate and currently works for Nightdive Studios, the team behind Strife: Veteran Edition. He was also the very first recipient of the Espi Lifetime Achievement Award.

 

What is Scythe?

Scythe is a 32 level megawad. The levels in this WAD are much smaller than normal, leaving them compact and giving the player less room to maneuver from enemy attacks. This is the newest megawad that Compet-n allows speedrunning for. The entire WAD was made in just several months. Two sequels, Scythe 2 and Scythe X, were later released.

 

Where is the creator now?

Scythe was entirely created by Erik Alm. Erik Alm also contributed to the Europa series, End Game, Community Chest 2, and Plutonia 2. He has since given up video game modding and he now works for the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control.

Edited by RileyXY1

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This is Part 11: 2004. The WAD I will be covering is Hellcore.

 

What is Hellcore?

Hellcore is a 32 level megawad. It is a compilation of levels made between 1995 and 2004, so they vary by quality. Simon Judd composed several music tracks for the WAD, while the rest of the music is ripped from other sources. It was the very first recipient of the Mordeth Award, the Cacoward given to the WAD that had the longest development time, named after the infamous Mordeth Total Conversion that is still not finished despite being in development since 1997. Hellcore 2.0 was released 2 years later. It contained 12 levels, 3 of which are new and the other 9 are revamped maps from the original Hellcore.

 

Where are the creators now?

To avoid regurgitating info from the Alien Vendetta and the 2002: A Doom Odyssey sections, I am only listing people who did not work on those wads. Robert Babor only made one other project: an obscure WAD called Black Sunset. Devon West has not worked on any other projects. Alberto Sposito would later contribute to Heretic Treasure Chest. Simon Judd would contribute to several other WADs and he is also the creator of the editor SLADE.

Edited by RileyXY1

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This is Part 12: 2005. The WAD I will be covering is Zen Dynamics.

 

What is Zen Dynamics?

Zen Dynamics is a 9 level partial conversion. Zen Dynamics has a complete arsenal of new weapons as well as an expanded bestiary of monsters to fight against. The levels are based on unfinished maps originally made by Malcolm Sailor. It was one of the first Doom WADs to feature weapon reloading. 

 

Where are the creators now?

The WAD was largely made by Xaser, who is one of the most prolific Doom modders in recent history. He would also create Doom: The Lost Episode and would also contribute to many WADs, including ZPack, Doom The Way id Did, Doom The Way id Did The Lost Episode, The 32in24 series of deathmatch maps, Doom 2 The Way id Did, and No End In Sight, among other projects. Xaser also used to serve as a judge for the Cacowards. Malcolm Sailor himself also created the Chord series (of which all 3 installments are a part of the Top 100 WADS of All Time) and he also contributed to The Talosian Incident, GothicDM2, and Crucified Dreams, among other projects.

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This is Part 13: 2006. The WAD I will be covering is Crucified Dreams. This is the first time in the series that I am covering a multiplayer WAD.

 

What is Crucified Dreams?

Crucified Dreams is a 41-level multiplayer WAD made for Boom-compatible source ports that acts as a spiritual successor to the GothicDM series. Its development started in 1998 and was finished in 2006. This WAD won a standard Cacoward as well as the Mordeth award.

 

Where are the creators now?

To avoid regurgitating info from the 10 Sectors, Alien Vendetta, 2002: A Doom Odyssey, and Zen Dynamics sections, I am only listing people who did not work on those WADs. Still, there are a ton of people who contributed to this project. They include:

 

1. Andy Kempling is a Doom speedrunner who still holds several records. He has since left the community.

2. Brad Carney is the original creator of the multiplayer source port Skulltag. He would later abandon Skulltag to create a new game called Wrack, and the remainder of the Skulltag team created a new source port called Zandronum to replace it.

3. Chris Martin worked on the GothicDM series.

4. David Gevert contributed to several multiplayer WADs, including the infamous Gothic99.

5. Derek MacDonald hosts a website where you can download various textures and flats for your own projects. He would also contribute to Gothic99 and Hell Revealed II, among other projects.

6. Kerkko Välilä is a WAD creator who contributed to several multiplayer WADs.

7. Nick Baker also created RTC-3057 and would also contribute to The Classic Episode, The Darkening, and Knee Deep In ZDoom, among other projects.

8. Scott Cover formerly worked as a newsie for Doomworld and was the creator of Mockery.

9. Tommie Quick is a former member of TeamTNT who would contribute to several WADs.

10. Travers Dunne also contributed to The Darkening, The Classic Episode, and GothicDM2, among other projects.

11. Marc Pullen created QDOOM and he would also contribute to Hacx and GothicDM2.

12. Ralph Vickers is an original member of the ZDaemon team and he also was the project head for Odamex. He created the WAD review site Unidoom and also contributed to several mapping projects.

13. Vincent Fong worked on several projects. He has since abandoned the community. He plays Street Fighter 3: 3rd Strike competitively.

 

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