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GoatLord

What are you doing to keep your mind healthy?

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35 minutes ago, Vorpal said:

 

I'm not a scholar so don't quote me on this but, I think the classical use of the word "demon" referred to exactly those dark thoughts and bad habits / vices, not little red goblins with pointy teeth. I'm guessing somewhere around Dante is where they began to be thought of as beings that punished us. Anyway I think the core of the idea is that yeah, we all have these things present in our minds that take an effort of will to suppress.

Yes, exactly. I am obviously not talking about the literal, traditional definition of "demon" or "possession," but rather, using them as metaphors to describe illness of the mind. I don't like to use psychological nomenclature because I think it's dehumanizing and repugnant. Referring to such ailments with more arcane language I think better illustrates the problem.

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On 3/21/2019 at 3:26 AM, Doomkid said:

Absolutely nothing, both my mind and body are an absolute trainwreck tbh

 

(EDIT: This was intended to come off as funny rather than snarky, just want to make that clear)

 

Though, I honestly do think I need to work a bit on my mental health overall. I've been having some unpleasant thoughts and feelings lately, to oversimplify it to a ridiculous degree. I'll manage to pull through and cope though, I just need to eat a bit better, drink more water, meditate a little more and maybe get back into doing a touch of light yoga..

Ah, cheer up, man! Look at your avatar - that's the happiest face I've ever seen :)

ZappaBig.thumb.gif.23f3d8299d1f795228d29

 

22 hours ago, banjiepixel said:

Whole Rip and Tear mentality is based on very negative mentality of hating your opponents and that could have some negative influence to the person playing but it is toned down somewhat by the fact that your opponent are demons and main reason to kill them is to get them out of your way. But I do think glory kills focus too much on doing something horrible things to the opponent. I think it is great that Doom Eternal seems to heading to direction where glory kills can be also something more silly, it is direction that is less toxic towards the player's mental state.

 

Negative influences can have a big effect on us and that toxicity can grow and spread very easily to other people like a disease. Consuming a lot of any hateful or hate glorifying media will make you feel more hateful. Same goes for media that spread other strong forms of negativity. It is important to balance these negative influences with positive influences or even let the positivity overpower them by a large margin. Person needs to careful not consume too much negative media or spend too much time around negative people and most of all you should yourself avoid doing things that are motivated by negativity.

Strongly disagree. Now, there is a class of people that has difficulty distinguishing between pixels in a video game, and blood, skin and bones. These people are a danger to themselves and others.

 

For the rest of us, Rip and Tear is a wholly positive activity. It's fun, and having fun has all manners of positive mental and physical effects. There's no "hating" involved. Sure, it's gory, and if that is disturbing to you, I have to ask: Why play?

 

I'd argue that there's not enough positivity on Earth that can make me feel comfortable in near proximity to anyone weakly-willed enough to be negatively influenced by a video game glory kill. Do chess Grandmasters evolve to become rulers of men? Does baseball cause players to want to smash people's heads in with a baseball bat?

 

Ripping and Tearing is a positive act, because I can distinguish between fantasy and reality.

 

I do agree that negative energy, and negativity in general can create a negative aura that can contribute and accumulate. I believe that evil should not be invited into one's life. If there really was some "hating" involved, maybe that could warp someone's emotions over time. But when I tear a video game monster from limb to limb, I'm playing "tough guy". I'm enjoying the graphics, the gush of bloodspray, the crunch of bones. Hate? That's more like passion! It looks and sounds great, and it's fun. If it weren't, then, yes, it would be a negative activity.

 

Videogames are one of the few healthy outlets for strong human emotion.

Edited by kb1

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14 hours ago, kb1 said:

For the rest of us, Rip and Tear is a wholly positive activity. It's fun, and having fun has all manners of positive mental and physical effects. There's no "hating" involved. Sure, it's gory, and if that is disturbing to you, I have to ask: Why play?

 

People are different. Eating the healthiest of foods can kill a person just because they have an allergy. Same things can have very different effects to a person. Too much focus on violence in videogame can lead to person becoming more violent but there are many more variables in play than just playing the game.My point is that some people can be more sensitive to such effects and it is important that we ourselves recoqnize at what point video game or anything else around us starts to harmful to us and start to limit our own exposure to it.

 

Rip and Tear isn't disturbing to me but it does expose us to certain sadistic mentality that can have some subtle effects on us outside of the video game. Especially there is so large focus on it. But then again, I must note here that people are different and that there can many other variables in play if person starts to change in negative way after playing a video game.

 

14 hours ago, kb1 said:

Ripping and Tearing is a positive act, because I can distinguish between fantasy and reality.

 

That doesn't mean that Ripping and Tearing doesn't have any subtle negative effects to your subconcious. Even if it simulated violence, you are still used to behaving negative way in that context. What is stopping some tiny bits of that negativity bleeding into some other contexts in your life? Because these things can be very subtle and unconcious, person can be totally blind to these kinds of changes in them. So basically having ability to distinguish between fantasy and reality doesn't mean anything when talking about these subtle changes.

 

15 hours ago, kb1 said:

Videogames are one of the few healthy outlets for strong human emotion.

 

Sure, beating up punching bag with a stick can be rather harmless outlet for such things, some would say even it to be heatlhy. But for some it can evolve into that aggression becoming very addictive while for someone else actual beating up puching bag becomes eventually meaningless and they start to get creative playing with the stick in many fun ways. Same outlet can give many different results since people are different. So such healthy outlets can be also very unhealthy.

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13 hours ago, banjiepixel said:

Rip and Tear isn't disturbing to me but it does expose us to certain sadistic mentality that can have some subtle effects on us outside of the video game. Especially there is so large focus on it. But then again, I must note here that people are different and that there can many other variables in play if person starts to change in negative way after playing a video game.

 

My 2 cents on this: If a video game or whatever influences one to such a degree (playing violent games -> becoming more sadistic), then the said person has always had sadistic tendencies in a dormant state within them but were just not aware of it, and something only acted like a catalyst to bring them to a surface level.

 

I'm really not seeing such changes as something that can happen over night, but I guess that also depends how easily is one influenced. I myself have pretty much always been into darker and/or more violent things, and yet, they've never had any noticeable (negative) impact on me. Mmmmm, punching thugs and breaking their bones is so much fun, I should probably dress like a lunatic and hunt down assholes on the streets! Except that's something that'd never crossed my mind, because video games =/= reality, and if someone is unable to tell the difference then they're a danger both to themselves and those around them, this part is simple. For instance, if performing fatalities in the MK games makes you want to dismember or mutilate people in real life, then you're batshit insane, there's nothing to debate here. You need psychiatric help (and probably be locked up somewhere).

 

I personally have been told BS similar to "video games cultivate evil tendencies in you!!!" back when I was a kid, and I sometimes still am (parents who are opposed to violent video games and violence as a whole and whatnot), but they have never really influenced me. It only gave the impression that they might have "done something to me" (ex: become more violent or whatever) sometimes, but in reality, that's always been there, it's just that with time I have become less willing to hide whatever was perceived. It should also be noted that people often assume they know someone but in fact, they probably don't know jack, I've been there myself, and it's easy to fall into such a trap when the said person simply doesn't open up to others, making assumptions based on what they believe it's true, but isn't.

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The gore in Doom was my hook to the franchise but the more I played, the more it morphed into a real time puzzle I engage with. And this is how I interact with just any "violent" video game now. I still have my "hell yeah that gibbing is FUN" moments (a bit of catharsis won't hurt), but I learned over time that there's a clear boundary between fictional violence and the real one. I don't think I'm guessing too much if I say that any sane person would be able to tell what is that boundary upon seeing an actual being getting shredded, crying in pain and having all the bodily functions shut down.

 

Anyway, whether I'm playing an arcade-y action game or a simulation, it is about the excitation of overcoming a situation or an opponent more than the raw will to destroy and inflict pain. And in that sense I think it contributes to my well being: I benefit from "sane multitasking", navigational challenges, quick problem solving and a healthy dose of stress.

On 3/21/2019 at 9:28 PM, Grazza said:

I suspect that learning new things from scratch is a lot more effective in this respect than pursuing existing skills to ever higher levels (even if they are ones that involve a lot of brain activity). That probably applies to physical as well as mental tasks.

This is something I suspect as well. Maybe taking a skill to higher levels would be akin to fine-tuning the specialized wiring of your brain, whereas learning a new skill often would keep your brain's plasticity in shape, no pun intended, to be adaptable at all times. Kind of like a tunnel vision vs spacial awareness kind of thing. You might also derive pleasure from gaining new knowledge that regularly, which is probably a good thing against depression/brain inflammation.

 

Mind you, I don't know much about neuroscience/biology so it's all guesses.

 

To be honest, a way for me to overcome depression was to play a variety of games in my free time (along exercising and reading books). Action, racing, platforming, strategy... It kept my mind busy yet I was little by little feeling more aware of my surroundings and feelings. I assume you can achieve the same results with just any variety of hobbies (indoor or outdoor) that challenges you to some extent. In fact, I kind of became an absolute learning junkie after that regimen and would learn new technical skills for the sheer fun of it. No pressure, just gaining wizard powers one spell at a time.

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13 minutes ago, seed said:

 

My 2 cents on this: If a video game or whatever influences one to such a degree (playing violent games -> becoming more sadistic), then the said person has always had sadistic tendencies in a dormant state within them but were just not aware of it, and something only acted like a catalyst to bring them to a surface level.

 

It also depends alot on what else the person is exposed in their life. Very violent video games can effect player's mind but that effect is usually neutralized by something else the player is being exposed to. There are many variables to this stuff but violent video games definitely can be one influence that can have even pretty big negative effect on person's mental health. Person being exposed to wrong stuff too much can change them, no matter what tendencies they started with.

 

43 minutes ago, seed said:

For instance, if performing fatalities in the MK games makes you want to dismember or mutilate people in real life, then you're batshit insane, there's nothing to debate here. You need psychiatric help (and probably be locked up somewhere).

 

We must remember that most of the effect of violent video games on us is usually far more subtle. Violent video game can desensitize us of certain types of violence and we spend so much time in many games being very aggressive and even enjoying how sadistic we can be in the game. Most of us will never actually copy the actual things we do in video games in real life but it is very likely some of our behaviour in a video game can bleed into our behaviour in real life. It is same as spending too much time with very depressed person, it probably doesn't make you become depressed but it is very likely that you will start have negative thoughts more often.

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3 minutes ago, banjiepixel said:

It also depends alot on what else the person is exposed in their life. Very violent video games can effect player's mind but that effect is usually neutralized by something else the player is being exposed to. There are many variables to this stuff but violent video games definitely can be one influence that can have even pretty big negative effect on person's mental health. Person being exposed to wrong stuff too much can change them, no matter what tendencies they started with.

 

I agree. But after all, if one can't such things it is best to just avoid being exposed to them. Gory fighting games or art are too much to handle for you? Well, try something else instead.

 

6 minutes ago, banjiepixel said:

We must remember that most of the effect of violent video games on us is usually far more subtle. Violent video game can desensitize us of certain types of violence and we spend so much time in many games being very aggressive and even enjoying how sadistic we can be in the game. Most of us will never actually copy the actual things we do in video games in real life but it is very likely some of our behaviour in a video game can bleed into our behaviour in real life. It is same as spending too much time with very depressed person, it probably doesn't make you become depressed but it is very likely that you will start have negative thoughts more often.

 

True. My point was mostly aimed at the more radical changes though, yet, at the end of the day, if it starts having undesired results it's better to avoid prolonged exposure, or learn to deal with it better.

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Before anything else I try to keep the essentials covered. Food, water, exercise, proper sleep, staying clean and organized, and having a sense of security (physical, social, financial, etc..). As long as I keep paying attention to these and look for ways to improve on any of them, they slowly get better.

 

After that I'm looking for activities that I find engaging. By engaging I mean that they present enough of a challenge for me based on my own skill level so that I don't get either bored or frustrated. Games have been a staple for that my whole life, and I do other things too. The essentials I listed above also count, so that's stuff like cooking, making my bed, cleaning the apartment, doing the laundry, etc. While they do feel like chores sometimes, it's always satisfying to get them done.

 

I've also sought mental health therapy at a few points in my life, including currently. I don't think anyone should consider themselves above doing that sort of a thing. Once you get used to them and the way they do things, they can be very helpful. It's good to have someone to speak with when you're facing something difficult.

 

I try to be helpful and considerate towards other people. There's something fulfilling about watching out for others and seeing them benefit from my own actions, no matter how small or unnoticed they go. I have to be careful though, since I don't want to be taken advantage of, and it's hard to know what is the right thing to do.

 

It's a long road, but once you decide to set foot on the path and stay on it, things get better. I don't mean to sound like some kind of a Buddhist, but I guess those are the sorts of principles I've settled on. A lot comes with age, I suppose.

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@banjiepixel: You keep switching between "you", and "us", and you claim that media has some subtle effects on "my" subconscious, without any proof. These effects may be happening to you, but they are not happening to me, as far as I know. But, what if they are? Who says such effects are negative? My issue with your post is your quickness to equate the enjoyment of violent video games to some sort of brewing negativity.

 

You claim subtle negative effects, I claim that there's nothing subtle about it: Blam! I just blew it's face off! Slice! There goes an arm! Look at the blood and guts! Yeah! I'm either committed, or I'm not, and, if not, I need to stop playing. If you're hurting yourself, by all means, stop playing. Otherwise, have a blast!

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Cat videos help me when my brain won't stop screaming at me. This is Tempest and Teacup. They love each other very, very much.

 

 

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Not working full time currently, so it's very stressful being cooped up all day. But three big changes I've made are:

  • Eating healthier. I try to have at least one vegetarian meal a day. It forces me to be a bit creative when I'm out shopping, and also lets me try new things.
  • Going on "artist dates." From The Artist's Way by Julia Cameron, she discusses spending a day (ideally away from tech) to go off, explore, see something you've been wanting to see, and just break from the routine of the week. It also serves the purpose of "refilling" your pool of inspiration for creative work. I usually go for a hike in the nature preserve behind my house.
  • Observing, but not analyzing my motives. I guess this is like the mindfulness meditation other posters mentioned in this thread. For a long time I thought I was driven by "emotions" or "recognition" or something, and it was awful thinking of myself as doing everything I do for inherently "wrong" reasons. I've since accepted that I have different motivations for everything that I do, and that it's natural, because we're humans and we live in the world. If I write them out in my journal I can often separate the good and bad motivations pretty intuitively, which has renewed my faith that I do have a "gut instinct" after all.

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Stay busy. I start cutting wood tomorrow for next winter. Gotta refill the wood racks. 

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Keep my mind healthy? You mean that's possible?

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Honestly, I work a lot and sometimes it's a good idea to have a break, I mean a trip. Just having a 2-3 day vacation is the best option for me. Only traveling gives me energy and keeps my mind healthy. That's why I have already visited more than 15 countries. If you like to travel too, read this article, it'll be really useful https://travelsites.com/blog/top-10-travel-mistakes-you-shouldnt-make/

Edited by Tove

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