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MaxRideWizardLord

Does anybody else feel that the main tune of 'Into Sandy's City' was took from, or least inspired from Russian Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson?

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Since the very toddler years, it was something I always consider a familiar tune, but I couldn't remember where exactly did I heard before. Even as I got older I couldn't remember exactly where did I first heard it from. Eventually I got reminded it's actually from the soviet's classic Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson serial, made in 1980. Appears it have almost exact same tune, even using the same stringed bow instruments instruments. This tune appears in two OST, and they sound exactly like the main tune of Into Sandy's City. Now experience the comparison:

 

Overture from Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson.

(01:07)

 

Similar tune plays in OST Sherlock Holmes & Dr. Watson - The Hound of the Baskervilles, which is about the same but speed up:

(01:30)

 

And now compare it to Doom II OST:

 

 

It might not sound exactly the same, neither have the same atmosphere between each other, but the tune's notes seem to be almost identical. There is also an popular remix of this tune made somewhere in what I believe was very early 90's. This one have the up tone beat and increased dynamic close to the one in Doom II:

 

 

Fun fact: there is a .midi version of this song was added to iddqd.wad which is a DM mod, this mod still appears among the iddqd community servers. At first I thought it was just a Into Sandy's City remix, appears I was wrong.

 

 

 

So what do you think, does it sound familiar to you? Do you think Robert (Bobby) Prince could have been inspired by the USSR's classics, at least subliminally? Share your opinion on this subject.

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Considering that I much doubt Bobby Prince was watching Russian versions of Sherlock Holmes stories, especially since that generation grew up with the USSR being the big boogeyman, and that Prince himself was a 1LT in Vietnam in 1969-1970, I'm pretty sure this is a coincidence.

 

By 1980, for what it's worth, he was a lawyer in Georgia, probably the last place you'd find someone watching output from the USSR.

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2 hours ago, Dark Pulse said:

Considering that I much doubt Bobby Prince was watching Russian versions of Sherlock Holmes stories, especially since that generation grew up with the USSR being the big boogeyman, and that Prince himself was a 1LT in Vietnam in 1969-1970, I'm pretty sure this is a coincidence.

 

By 1980, for what it's worth, he was a lawyer in Georgia, probably the last place you'd find someone watching output from the USSR.

 

Just because he was true american patriot that doesn't mean he'd be allergic to everything else that comes from another countries, especially a culture that is close to of his ancestors (for example, hamburger is a original national german food, for this reason it's called hamburger as it came from Hamburg); neither does that mean that all of USSR movies had it's ideological subliminal messages hidden in our movies. In case of Russian Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson series, they tried to be as close as it's only possible to the original roman, which is set in aristocratic England times; and even though they couldn't get access to film it independently in England, they were looking for places around USSR which would give a good immersion and feel of ol' good bourgeoisie aristocracy of Great Britain, so the filming areas took places in cities like St.Peterburg and many other small cities in Latvia and Estonia.

 

What I've heard, some of the work were actually been translated and broadcasted for the USA audience even in big cinema, especially our best works like Ivan Vasilievich: Back to the Future (1973) which been approved by many all around the world and even get some nominations. A lot of Russian novels, even soviet novels like The Twelve Chairs were filmed by american Mel Brooks BEFORE the USSR did film these, and these films were popular among Americans. Just like Russians did enjoy A Fistful of Dollars\Per qualche dollaro in più\Good, Bad, and the Ugly in the soviet time, even though it had american actors with westernized "life style". I see no practical or rational reason as to why Robert Prince would neglect watching any of these movies just because it's either filmed in USSR or the original author was from USSR\Russian Empire.

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48 minutes ago, MaxRideWizardLord said:

Just because he was true american patriot that doesn't mean he'd be allergic to everything else that comes from another countries, especially a culture that is close to of his ancestors (for example, hamburger is a original national german food, for this reason it's called hamburger as it came from Hamburg); neither does that mean that all of USSR movies had it's ideological subliminal messages hidden in our movies. In case of Russian Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson series, they tried to be as close as it's only possible to the original roman, which is set in aristocratic England times; and even though they couldn't get access to film it independently in England, they were looking for places around USSR which would give a good immersion and feel of ol' good bourgeoisie aristocracy of Great Britain, so the filming areas took places in cities like St.Peterburg and many other small cities in Latvia and Estonia.

 

What I've heard, some of the work were actually been translated and broadcasted for the USA audience even in big cinema, especially our best works like Ivan Vasilievich: Back to the Future (1973) which been approved by many all around the world and even get some nominations. A lot of Russian novels, even soviet novels like The Twelve Chairs were filmed by american Mel Brooks BEFORE the USSR did film these, and these films were popular among Americans. Just like Russians did enjoy A Fistful of Dollars\Per qualche dollaro in più\Good, Bad, and the Ugly in the soviet time, even though it had american actors with westernized "life style". I see no practical or rational reason as to why Robert Prince would neglect watching any of these movies just because it's either filmed in USSR or the original author was from USSR\Russian Empire.

Well then let's put it this way:

  1. American TV wouldn't have aired Russian-based media really. Again, this was 1980 - pre-Gorbachev and pre-Glasnost. The "Miracle on Ice" would happen this year, and once it did, America was in a big fever pitch over beating the USSR with patriotism skyrocketing. The Americans would boycott the 1980 Summer Olympics in Moscow; the Soviets would respond by boycotting the 1984 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles. This was dead-smack in the middle of the Cold War - there would have been probably letters of complaint if anything clearly Russian in origin aired on American TV, even if it was honest and straight like the Sherlock Holmes series you mentioned. Americans were literally told for 35+ years that Russians were the enemy - that simply isn't going to change because of the source material of a show.
  2. That's not to say things like international arts houses or whatnot wouldn't have aired it. But the number of people going to those would've been incredibly small and liberal-minded, and in this time period, being considered a liberal was basically a slur. (The lyrics of a Supertramp song from 1979 come to mind: "I said, now watch what you say or they'll be calling you a radical / a liberal / oh, fanatical, criminal.") I don't know Bobby Prince's politics, but generally speaking, Americans who were brought up in that period were taught (presumably much like Soviets of the same generation) that the other side were the enemy, and that their system would eventually reign supreme.
  3. Obviously, before WW2, Russian stuff was not nearly as maligned as it was post-WW2, when patriotism on both sides took hold, and resulted in the second Red Scare from 1947-1960 over here, and is synonymous with the term "McCarthyism" after its leading war drummer, Senator Joe McCarthy. (The first was shortly after the October Revolution, from 1917-1920.) Essentially that period from 1945-1985 is when you could say American-Russian relations were at their worst; things greatly improved at the collapse of the USSR in 1991, only to steadily worsen once Putin began taking hold of the country as a de-facto dictator in the 2000s, because Putin is not someone who can let the past be the past.

Essentially, I'm not saying that it's impossible for something like that to have made it here, or for Bobby Prince to have seen it. But consider the circumstances: Bobby Prince didn't begin making music in games until the early 90s. He'd have to have seen that somewhere in the very conservative American South (this was the full-on Bible Belt televangelist era) somehow in some sort of art house in the decade beforehand (meaning at the very least he'd have had to retain those bars in his head for years), when it would've been much easier to just import a British production that came along just a few years later, and so on.

 

In other words, for your claim to be true: Someone would've had to show it, Prince would've had to see it, and he would've had to retain a small segment of its soundtrack in his head for literally about a decade, if not more.

 

The odds aren't zero (unless Prince himself comes forth and sets the record straight), but I'm pretty sure they're not much higher. Sorry.

 

Oh, as an aside: The hamburger has a much more complicated history. There's actually a village not far from where I am that's also called Hamburg, and it itself is one of many claimants as to the inventors of the hamburger, and possibly its namesake as opposed to Hamburg, Germany. Regardless of its history, the hamburger as you or I would identify it is very definitely a symbol of America, but the available evidence hints that the likelihood it was also invented here is quite high.

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Yeah, the source of this track is the Stone Temple Pilots song linked above, confirmed explicitly from metadata comments found in MIDI files released by John Romero. So to answer the original question: no, Russian adaptations of Sherlock Holmes were not involved.

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17 minutes ago, fraggle said:

Yeah, the source of this track is the Stone Temple Pilots song linked above, confirmed explicitly from metadata comments found in MIDI files released by John Romero. So to answer the original question: no, Russian adaptations of Sherlock Holmes were not involved.

I forgot about those. That would've answered it pretty much straight away.

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YOU'RE ALL WRONG!!  It's from Chopping Mall!   Not the main theme though.  You hear it a little in this clip.   But you really hear it earlier in the movie while the Killbots are creeping. 

 

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1 hour ago, Gokuma said:

YOU'RE ALL WRONG!!  It's from Chopping Mall!   Not the main theme though.  You hear it a little in this clip.   But you really hear it earlier in the movie while the Killbots are creeping.

Uhh, maybe you should read posts. Fraggle just said exactly where it came from:

2 hours ago, fraggle said:

Yeah, the source of this track is the Stone Temple Pilots song linked above, confirmed explicitly from metadata comments found in MIDI files released by John Romero. So to answer the original question: no, Russian adaptations of Sherlock Holmes were not involved.

 

Edited by Edward850

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8 minutes ago, Edward850 said:

Uhh, maybe you should read posts. Linguica just said exactly where it came from:

 

Maybe you should read posts Mr. Edward850 because that was posted by the esteemed FRAGGLE, not LINGUICA!! #FakeNews #YouBlewIt #MuchLove

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15 minutes ago, Edward850 said:

Uhh, maybe you should read posts. Linguica just said exactly where it came from:

 

Maybe you should learn to detect sarcasm. @Gokuma, please put /s next time if you're being sarcastic.

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7 minutes ago, Ralphis said:

Maybe you should read posts Mr. Edward850 because that was posted by the esteemed FRAGGLE, not LINGUICA!! #FakeNews #YouBlewIt #MuchLove

Yeah that was foolish of me to not double check my post, I'm incredibly tired for some reason and must have gotten distracted. Oh well.

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I know it's based on Sex Type Thing, but it sounds almost nothing like it to my ears. I'm not disputing it or anything, but it's just weird because there's even an unused midi that does sound like Sex Type Thing. Listening to them side by side, the key, structure and instrument selection are pretty different, at least as far as my ears are concerned.

 

I remember reading that Into Sandy's City originally had a piano rather than a harpsichord which would be even less similar! I guess it must have gone through several revisions and ended up quite different from where it started. It's funny that the music from a Russian version of Sherlock Holmes sounds more alike by complete coincidence.

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On 9/28/2019 at 11:41 PM, Dark Pulse said:

By 1980, for what it's worth, he was a lawyer in Georgia, probably the last place you'd find someone watching output from the USSR.

 

Ah, but in 1980 Georgia was part of the USSR. It became independent in 1991.

 

I jest. I didn't realise there was a Soviet version of Sherlock Holmes. I can see the character appealing to the Soviet mindset - he was rational, the villains tended to be landowners, Moriarty is an arch-capitalist, Watson represents the proletariat etc. I wonder if the music is based on an earlier piece, that in turn is based on a basic rhythmic idea that goes back centuries? The basic rhythm always reminded me of Gary Numan@'s "I Die You Die":

 

Here in the UK we had an extremely limited if not non-existent exposure to Soviet-era media, but then again there was a huge language barrier and we didn't have any exposure to television from e.g. India or China or the Philippines or Indonesia or Canada or Brazil either.

 

I have vague childhood memories of a sitcom called Comrade Dad, which starred George Cole in an alternative Britain that had become a Soviet client state. It was broadcast (once) in 1986 and off the top of my head was a bizarre mixture of alternative world and kitchen sink comedy, with jokes about potato rationing etc:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comrade_Dad

 

 

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16 minutes ago, Ashley_Pomeroy said:

Ah, but in 1980 Georgia was part of the USSR. It became independent in 1991.

Yeah, I realized earlier today when re-reading the topic and my response that it was a matter of time before someone did this.

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There's a lot of accidental similarities in music out there. Does not always mean there is a connection. Metal owes a lot to classical and rock. Rock owes a lot to the blues. There is a vague resemblance to the way the song builds but in my opinion the melody sounds quite different as does the chord structure. Into Sandy's City hangs on chords a lot particularly in the verses whereas in this piece the changes are reasonably frequent. I am not an expert when it comes to picking things up by ear though, I usually have to sit down with my guitar and try to play along, so another musician may correct me on this one. A funny coincidence, nothing more. 

 

On 9/30/2019 at 1:21 AM, Doomkid said:

I know it's based on Sex Type Thing, but it sounds almost nothing like it to my ears. I'm not disputing it or anything, but it's just weird because there's even an unused midi that does sound like Sex Type Thing. Listening to them side by side, the key, structure and instrument selection are pretty different, at least as far as my ears are concerned.

 

Really the only similarity is the intro riff of the STP song informing the melody of the Doom song. You are correct that structurally the two are quite different. It is definitely one of the less blatant of the metal and hard rock song rip offs in the classic Doom soundtracks.

Edited by Murdoch

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On 9/29/2019 at 12:11 AM, Sgt Nate V said:

Maybe you should learn to detect sarcasm. @Gokuma, please put /s next time if you're being sarcastic.

 

Actually I was faking a sarcasm... 

 

Hooked up my VCR to crappy capture adapter just to edit together these scenes with the music.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5_UnNz3mMjQ

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On 9/29/2019 at 4:30 AM, Dark Pulse said:

American TV wouldn't have aired Russian-based media really. Again, this was 1980 - pre-Gorbachev and pre-Glasnost. The "Miracle on Ice" would happen this year, and once it did, America was in a big fever pitch over beating the USSR with patriotism skyrocketing. The Americans would boycott the 1980 Summer Olympics in Moscow; the Soviets would respond by boycotting the 1984 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles. This was dead-smack in the middle of the Cold War - there would have been probably letters of complaint if anything clearly Russian in origin aired on American TV, even if it was honest and straight like the Sherlock Holmes series you mentioned. Americans were literally told for 35+ years that Russians were the enemy - that simply isn't going to change because of the source material of a show.

 

I am not sure if TV did transfer Russian Sherlock Holmes in the USA, but that may depend from state to local broadcast network, but there are certainly some russian\soviet\empire's show been broadcast in USA back when USSR was still alive. Namely, something as insignificant as A Kitten Named Woof and something more ideological like Seventeen Moments of Spring as I've heard from actual american friends. Nobody did freak out and they view it as rather exotic content from other part of world, like tasting an Indian food; even less so, because the culture of Russia is hardly any different than any of the west, AT LEAST back in 10-90's years, despite our government was illegitimate conqueered by the red plague in October 1917's.

 

As for "Americans were literally told for 35+ years that Russians were the enemy", is simply not true. A lot of media, partly or entirely owned by government, as much as I hate it, did praise horrendous dictators like Fidel Castro, some go as insane to praise not any better socialist dictator. If you don't believe me, google how in 1959 year the CIA did praise Castro, claiming him to be "anti-communist". If you don't believe me, here is the list of proofs: https://archive.org/stream/FabianEscalanteSecretWarCubaCIA/Fabian Escalante Secret War Cuba CIA_djvu.txt

https://www.cia.gov/library/readingroom/docs/DOC_0000132546.pdf

As for Russia in general, a lot of media was rather neutral. I doubt many Americans hated anything related to Russian stuff in particular. Hell, even when our soviet "dictator", i.e. Secretary-General Nikita Khrushchev did visit USA in 1959, a lot of Americans were "dying" to see him in person. He was the most popular celebrity of that time. Some did even gave him a gift, in return he gift them his personal hand clock. If Russians were so hated by Americans and considered as enemy, there would been a high risk of him being shot, rather than being adored by many Americans instead.

 

Anyone with half a brain would NOT buy in to such obvious mumbo jumbo that any government would feed their people with. Just like Russians by the end of 60's were so sick with all this horsecrap that a majority would wish to finally drop this non-sense policy of planned economy, restrictions for private property and iron curtain. The late 70's is when life in USSR, especially in Siberian part of RSFSR, become really hard. A lot of were really starving as not much of food were coming their way. Gorbachev was literally praised by people when he came to power in 1985, but things did change once he couldn't manage to keep the union from collapse and become one of the most hated person in whole of Russia, despite doing his hardest to both save USSR and give it more freedom.

 

Sure, there are mentally retarded and troublesome individuals are everywhere in all of countries, and unfortunately to this day we have a lot of idiots legitimately believing that communism does work and that "Stalin was a hero" (despite killing more Russians any other person ever before), that we get a lot after new wave of socialist propaganda that started somewhere around 2016-2017, that is ironically, funded by our government that at the same time, hypocritically, claim to be all for "freedom and capitalism". I guess it's just another proof that the IQ Bell Curve is indeed an indisputable fact, so any nation and country will inevitable have weak minded people regardless of what.

 

On 9/29/2019 at 4:30 AM, Dark Pulse said:

That's not to say things like international arts houses or whatnot wouldn't have aired it. But the number of people going to those would've been incredibly small and liberal-minded, and in this time period, being considered a liberal was basically a slur. (The lyrics of a Supertramp song from 1979 come to mind: "I said, now watch what you say or they'll be calling you a radical / a liberal / oh, fanatical, criminal.") I don't know Bobby Prince's politics, but generally speaking, Americans who were brought up in that period were taught (presumably much like Soviets of the same generation) that the other side were the enemy, and that their system would eventually reign supreme.

 

Even though some of the Russian movies DID get to the USA cinema and theaters, not just "art house" or some subterranean club. A good portion of soviet stuff did sink in to the USA and shared among all of citizens with the power the ol' good free market and "black market". Again, let me repeat myself: The american born actor, director, producer, USA patriot, Oscar owning Mel Brooks DID made a film in 1970 for USA audience based of SOVIET book that was published in 1928's, that's a Stalin's rule time, and it was loved by many USA citizens, at least I get to know it from some hardcore USA patriot friend that I have. You do NOT need to be a liberal or be part of any other political deviation non-sense in order to be rational and do not allow government to replace your own critical thinking and your own independent taste. And most "soviets" were fed up with the bullshit the government had to feed them with, especially considering a lot of what was propagandized did contradict each other. It did get as ridiculous as one part of socialists (Khrushchev epoch) did claim other socialists (stalinists and trotskyists) as "not real socialists". Just like during Stalin time, the propaganda that "trotskyists are not real socialists" were even more brutal and dangerous, a single look at the tiny-micro small purge (by Stalin's standards) that is known as Great Purge may get you be convinced in that.

 

On 9/29/2019 at 4:30 AM, Dark Pulse said:

Obviously, before WW2, Russian stuff was not nearly as maligned as it was post-WW2, when patriotism on both sides took hold, and resulted in the second Red Scare from 1947-1960 over here, and is synonymous with the term "McCarthyism" after its leading war drummer, Senator Joe McCarthy. (The first was shortly after the October Revolution, from 1917-1920.) Essentially that period from 1945-1985 is when you could say American-Russian relations were at their worst; things greatly improved at the collapse of the USSR in 1991, only to steadily worsen once Putin began taking hold of the country as a de-facto dictator in the 2000s, because Putin is not someone who can let the past be the past.

 

Before the war, and even after, given how greatly did USA help the USSR with Lend-Lease (no matter that many communists propagandists say otherwise), we had actually good relationship with USA, at least until like 1946. We even were attempted to make our own "hamburgers". Same Khrushchev liked to visit the USA often, mostly taking the ideas about agricultural techniques on how to grow the corn. Hell, even bought some corn seeds, financing USA basically.

 

I wouldn't call Putin to be a dictator "de-facto", since he did, somewhat, "won the elections" (which I admit are possibly fishy, especially knowing our "146%" meme), and thus basically being a democratically elected president, but he sure is planning to be a dictator now with the new wave of high budged socialists propaganda he started not so long ago, as before he mostly gain popularity by mere "getting back the Croatia", even though it did nothing good for either Croatians, neither for anyone living in Russia, or anyone else in general.

 

On 9/29/2019 at 4:30 AM, Dark Pulse said:

Essentially, I'm not saying that it's impossible for something like that to have made it here, or for Bobby Prince to have seen it. But consider the circumstances: Bobby Prince didn't begin making music in games until the early 90s. He'd have to have seen that somewhere in the very conservative American South (this was the full-on Bible Belt televangelist era) somehow in some sort of art house in the decade beforehand (meaning at the very least he'd have had to retain those bars in his head for years), when it would've been much easier to just import a British production that came along just a few years later, and so on.

 

In other words, for your claim to be true: Someone would've had to show it, Prince would've had to see it, and he would've had to retain a small segment of its soundtrack in his head for literally about a decade, if not more.

 

The odds aren't zero (unless Prince himself comes forth and sets the record straight), but I'm pretty sure they're not much higher. Sorry.

 

Funny how you give emphasize of him living in a "conservative American South", while I have most american friends there, from Texas to Virginia and Maryland, saying exactly the opposite thing you're now just telling me about American-Russia relations during early 80's.

 

As for Bobby Prince's political and cultural view, who knows. I see nothing wrong in enjoying a good piece of aristocratic atmosphere of Great Britain golden age from a finely crafted movie series.

 

As for "meaning at the very least he'd have had to retain those bars in his head for years" and "he would've had to retain a small segment of its soundtrack in his head for literally about a decade, if not more", well, I think you misunderstanding how a single part of melody your heard just once may affect you, especially if you didn't pay much attention to it. Then again, that's the power of subliminal memory. A melody that you might heard just ONCE at age of 3 or lower, may permanently burnt in to your brain and you might remember it always, subconsciously, you might even assume it's something that you entirely made it up yourself. So the years don't matter at all.

 

On 9/29/2019 at 4:36 AM, TheMightyHeracross said:

The story I always heard was that was originally based on this Stone Temple Pilots song:

 

 

 

On 9/29/2019 at 5:02 AM, Dark Pulse said:

I forgot about those. That would've answered it pretty much straight away.

 

...

 

Actually, it's all just a made up myth by fans and no more, a myth that been pushed so hard, it became a legend and people start to believe it. As the user named Diabolución did just confirm, it's all just a lie. We never really knew what really served for inspiration of Into Sandy's City for Bobby Prince. And as the user named Doomkid admit, it sounds nothing like Into Sandy's City by the Bobby Prince.

 

But hey, who knows, maybe the piece of music from Russian Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson DID inspire the sex type thing. :P After all, it did came out AFTER the Russian Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson soundtrack. ;-)

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14 hours ago, MaxRideWizardLord said:

Actually, it's all just a made up myth by fans and no more, a myth that been pushed so hard, it became a legend and people start to believe it. As the user named Diabolución did just confirm, it's all just a lie. We never really knew what really served for inspiration of Into Sandy's City for Bobby Prince. And as the user named Doomkid admit, it sounds nothing like Into Sandy's City by the Bobby Prince.

 

I can hear the similarity of the "Into Sandy's City" melody to the intro riff of "Sex Type Thing" clear as day though in terms of structure both songs are indeed very different. Even the riff itself is not 100% identical to the melody, true, but given that hard rock and heavy metal informed much of the Doom soundtrack it seems incredibly unlikely it is a complete coincidence. It may not even be intentionally lifted. Prince may have heard the song, been goofing around, and come up with a melody similar to it without realising the source of it. I call it accidental inspiration and have done it myself. More than a few times I have messed around on the guitar and come up with something, only to later realise it's from an existing song.

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10 minutes ago, Murdoch said:

 

I can hear the similarity of the "Into Sandy's City" melody to the intro riff of "Sex Type Thing" clear as day though in terms of structure both songs are indeed very different. Even the riff itself is not 100% identical to the melody, true, but given that hard rock and heavy metal informed much of the Doom soundtrack it seems incredibly unlikely it is a complete coincidence. It may not even be intentionally lifted. Prince may have heard the song, been goofing around, and come up with a melody similar to it without realising the source of it. I call it accidental inspiration and have done it myself. More than a few times I have messed around on the guitar and come up with something, only to later realise it's from an existing song.

 

The notes, chords, temp, and let alone instruments doesn't have any sort of similarities, as from what I can perceive it. Like, not at all, no matter how you look at it. It's completely different melody, and let me elaborate in details why: In "sex type thing" it's just TWO notes of low and high in all of parts, that repeated 3 times - and they got from high, to middle, and to low, all of the time in a loop and all are alike. In the song Into Sandy's City - it's 3 notes of low, middle, middle; then middle, high, middle; then something like low, high, middle; then something like low, middle, middle, and then plays an extra melody that have nothing in common with what sex type thing have. So yeah, it doesn't even have 3 parts, but whole 4, after which the extra melody plays.

 

Yeah, sorry bro but it's just a myth that some fans really forced themselves to believe in it.

 

 

 

The reason I bring the Overture from Russian Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson is because it ACTUALLY have the same notes of the song. It have exactly the same 3 notes of low, middle, middle; then middle, high, middle; then something like low, high, middle. Yeah it have 3 parts instead of 4, but the melody that goes after 3th part is actually partly resembles the 3 notes of 4th part of Into Sandy's City, and the melody that plays after 3th part is more close to the one in Into Sandy's City, rather than the one you hear in sex type thing, which is narrow down of low, high, middle and low again. In Into Sandy's City - it's low, middle, high, low. Oh, and both Into Sandy's City and Overture from Russian Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson plays on Stringed Musical Instruments, at least that's what we consider harpsichord to be here.

 

On 9/29/2019 at 4:30 AM, Dark Pulse said:

Oh, as an aside: The hamburger has a much more complicated history. There's actually a village not far from where I am that's also called Hamburg, and it itself is one of many claimants as to the inventors of the hamburger, and possibly its namesake as opposed to Hamburg, Germany. Regardless of its history, the hamburger as you or I would identify it is very definitely a symbol of America, but the available evidence hints that the likelihood it was also invented here is quite high.

 

I am 100% certain that people of Hamburg did enjoy their national food since far before McDonalds, possible before America was even colonized, as I've heard from the German speaking people themselves. Not only that, but Hamburger is definitelly an national food of Hamburg up to this day. From what I see, the chances that the national food of Germany did actually originate in some small village in USA, which by some coincidence is named after the German big city Hamburg, are close to zero. Besides, the Hamburg is definitely not an English word, and thus the "village" named Hamburg must consist of german speaking people that came from Hamburg the city in Germany, thus taken their culture from that one country. I can't see why say Russians, who migrated a lot both in 18th, 19th and even 20th century can't take their culture among with them and install it in to America, after all USA used to be, and in fact, supposed to be by the founding fathers to be like a big land of mixed Western culture from all of the parts of Europe.

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Just now, MaxRideWizardLord said:

Yeah, sorry bro but it's just a myth that some fans really forced themselves to believe in it.

 

I have never heard the "myth" until this thread. So I am not forcing myself believe a damned thing. I can hear a similarity. It is not exact. I never said it was exact. I explicitly stated as such. Learn to comprehend words before being patronising.

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19 minutes ago, Murdoch said:

I have never heard the "myth" until this thread. So I am not forcing myself believe a damned thing. I can hear a similarity. It is not exact. I never said it was exact. I explicitly stated as such. Learn to comprehend words before being patronising.

 

No, I did comprehend everything clear as the day may even be. What you allude as that I can't comprehend words, perhaps implies that you can't comprehend words yourself. You clearly stated, quote:

 

1 hour ago, Murdoch said:

similarity of the "Into Sandy's City" melody to the intro riff of "Sex Type Thing"

 

The word "similarity of the melody" already implies that the song has similar notes of melody even though the rest are not fitting, and I've just proven that to be wrong. There are not a single note of the melody that is similar to Into Sandy's City, it's an totally, completely, absolutely 100% different song and there is no similarity of melody.

 

melody

/ˈmɛlədi/

noun

* a sequence of single notes that is musically satisfying; a tune.

"he picked out an intricate melody on his guitar"

 

* the aspect of musical composition concerned with the arrangement of single notes to form a satisfying sequence.

"her great gift was for melody"

 

If you wanted to say that the melody does SOUND similar exclusively for you, you should have mention that you "hear these songs alike that they both sound similar for me" instead of talking about "hear the similarity of the "Into Sandy's City" melody". So don't blame me for not "comprehending words" if you can't comprehensively spell out words yourself.

 

29 minutes ago, Diabolución said:

https://doomshack.org/uploads/doom_unreleased_music.zip

https://web.archive.org/web/20070701231643/http://rome.ro/media/doom_unreleased_music.zip

 

The file un23.mid, the MIDI about which fraggle is speaking, explicitly mentions Stone Temple Pilots -- "Sex Type Thing".

 

 

LOL, yeah that sound nothing like Into Sandy's City.

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