Jump to content
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...
DooM Bear

What / how many languages do you speak?

Recommended Posts

Posted (edited)

Spanish (native, argentino)

English (badly, sometimes i use google translator, other times i write in english)

And no other language :|

Share this post


Link to post
6 hours ago, HitBoi64 said:
  • English 
  • Arabic (Native)
  • Japanese (I only use Japanese for speaking, Not for Typing or other stuff)
  • French (Extremely poor, Just like what @seed said)
  • .TXT
  • C++

if programming languages count: Python, HTML, some zdoom languages, a bit of danmakufu scripting, some c++.

Share this post


Link to post

Spanish native speaker.

And quite good at English. (But I abuse maybe a bit too much of the ''quite'' and ''mate'' words.)

I'm currently interested on learning German. Although I don't know exactly where to start. I'm not a big fan of using apps like Duolingo, but I think it's the only way I have left.

Share this post


Link to post
Posted (edited)

Portuguese (Native, from Brazil)

English (B2 - which is high intermediary): I can write and speak without much difficult, but my grammar and pronouce sucks hard.

French (A2): I can understand well texts written in french, but I still have difficulties when trying to write, speak or listen.

Spanish (A1): Honestly, only because it's similar to Portuguese.

 

I also want to learn German.

Share this post


Link to post

English (properly fluent) 

French (quite fluent) 

 

I also know a few bits and pieces of Spanish. There are a couple of other languages where I know a few phrases and words - mostly thanks to movies - (such as German and Italian), but to me a few words don't really count. 

 

I would like to learn German and Italian, however. 

Share this post


Link to post

English (UK) is my native language I know however I did used to study French back in my high school days. I may be able to say the occasional broken French sentence or two and I can sometimes get a rough idea of what some French words are when translated to English.

Share this post


Link to post
17 hours ago, TheNoob_Gamer said:

I guess this could serve well as a "Where are you from" thread, heh.

 

Hehehehe yeah I almost considered asking that but figured asking what languages people spoke might be more inclusive for people that were worried about PerSec :-P

 

Thats also why I included the “how many languages do you speak?” part too :-P

Share this post


Link to post

Russian (native)
Tatar (near-native)
English.
A bit of French, Spanish, Portuguese and Italian. 

Share this post


Link to post
4 minutes ago, Taw Tu'lki said:

Tatar (near-native)

Oh wow, didn't know you're a Tatar too. A historical nation that also gets mentioned in some part of Indonesian history. :)

Share this post


Link to post

- Korean (native)

- English (good enough to communicate)

- Japanese (not fluent, but understands some words + able to read & write both kana)

Share this post


Link to post
20 hours ago, andrewj said:

Cyrillic is fairly easy to pick up, there's only 29 letters I think and the capitals are not much different to the lowercase letters.  I've been learning them causally, a few here, a few there.  Can be a little confusing at times though since the N-sound looks like a H, the S-sound looks like a C, the R-sound looks like a P, etc.....

 

Thats actually really good to know!

 

I’ve always been fascinated with Russia and have always wanted to learn Russian but was super intimidated by the completely different alphabet :-P

 

Same with Arabic :-P

 

Only Arabic I know is the stereotypical English speaker words (Allah akbar, etc.) and from Hitman: Contracts (taught me “hello my friend” - won’t attempt to write it as will probably butcher the spelling) :-P

 

Hope to learn them both some day :-D

Share this post


Link to post

Russian as my native

English is an universal insulting language used for annoy shmuck-ish customers at store I work in.

And yeah, my knowledge is poor, yet I may to read, text, talk. Just not that good as you'd may (not) expect.

Share this post


Link to post

enough to joke darki this is a serious topic!!!! I speak English American and Russian as well as Italian (Blood is solo mierda XDDD)

Share this post


Link to post
Posted (edited)

Other languages I tried to learn but didn't go forward with (mainly because there are too many choices):

  1. Bulgarian: seems the easiest Slavic language, devoid of all those crazy cases (except for a few simple inflections). Expressing genitive is as easy as in western Romance languages (with "at the" instead of "of the"), which is easier than Romanian's rule! It also has lots of familiar words, either from Old Church Slavonic with which we share etymologies, or common western loan words. It sounds a bit funny too, in a way that the more standard-sounding rest of the Slavic languages (with cases and without articles) don't. Helps that I live closer to Bulgaria than to Transylvania...
  2. Hungarian: strange tongue. It has a very rigid and orderly grammar though. It looks a bit like a programming language which lets you enumerate properties: words can be in any order (but emphasis is on first), it matters what endings you give them. Hardly any words are similar to anything we Indo-Europeans use, and a lot of their words look like each other.
  3. German: the language has a dry sound and has some annoying word order rules. It's really tiresome to pronounce that "ei" diphthong.
  4. Swedish and Norwegian: I've put these together because I had to visit both countries for family AND work reasons. Bokmal Norwegian seems to be the same as Danish, but clearer in pronunciation. However, I hate that Norwegian has dialects, whereas Swedish seems unique. Bokmal Norwegian looks easier to read than Swedish which has lots of parasitic characters such as "c". I like that both languages, despite being so remote, tend to be on the easy, English-like (or easier) side. Definitely not as complex as German. Downside: too few people speak them, and would just speak English to you. Pronunciation doesn't seem the clearest either.
  5. Japanese: I wanted to learn this a bit because I thought it was cool. However, the on'yomi kanji are too complicated and sound too much alike. I'm not fond of its agglutinated grammar either.
  6. Chinese: if only it didn't have tones! By grammar it's an easy language! Kinda like English/Swedish/Persian, you just put words together and make sentences. But tones and the nondescript variation in sounds is a major turn-off. It also sucks that Mandarin is not the only language. Most films seem to be from Hong Kong, and those speak Cantonese.

Share this post


Link to post

(1) English: native speaker.

(2) Russian: also technically native, but I still consider my English skills to be superior, as that's the language I use in a wider variety of situations. Sometimes, I feel like I have some slight gaps in my Russian vocabulary, causing me to struggle to grasp at a word, which doesn't really happen in English.

(3) Hebrew: intermediate. I know it well enough to have basic conversations, but I can definitely tell I have gaps in my knowledge when I hear native speakers.

(4) Finnish: beginner. I probably wouldn't really even count this as a language I properly "know," since I can only really ask and answer some basic questions. In truth, I learned most of my Finnish from HexTheRex on ZDaemon's Thursday Night Survival, lol. So I can maybe have a basic conversation about Doom and some other topics, but my vocabulary is really limited. I can't seem to understand shit when I hear people speak it, and even in written text, I often find it really hard to recognize familiar words when the grammar is applied to them; that can change the way a word looks significantly. It's a pretty hard language but an interesting challenge nonetheless. I doubt I'll ever really be fluent in it though.

Share this post


Link to post

I can read a lot of Japanese, but my ability to speak Japanese is fairly basic. 

Share this post


Link to post
  • Native Hebrew
  • Basic English
  • Basic Arabic
  • Some Russian
  • Some Danish

Share this post


Link to post
Posted (edited)

-Native Spanish, rioplatense dialect.

 

-English @ C2 level. Since I've been exposed to english media my entire life I could say it's basically my second native language at this point :P


-German @ at least C1 level, not certified yet but I should be sitting for DSD II in a couple of months if everything goes well. Certainly fluent enough to have conversations with native German speakers, as long as they don't speak that monster called Schwäbisch...


-I can sometimes understand people chatting in Portuguese in online games, and even form some very basic and broken sentences. It's kinda similar to Spanish, so it's not exactly that surprising.

Edited by uber

Share this post


Link to post
5 minutes ago, uber said:

-Native Spanish, rioplatense dialect.
-German @ at least C1 level, not certified yet but I should be sitting for DSD II in a couple of months if everything goes well. Certainly fluent enough to have conversations with native German speakers, as long as it's not that monster called Schwäbisch...

Hey man, I'm also quite interested at learning German as a native Spanish speaker. How did you find it? Any tips?

Share this post


Link to post
11 hours ago, printz said:

Chinese: if only it didn't have tones! By grammar it's an easy language! Kinda like English/Swedish/Persian, you just put words together and make sentences. But tones and the nondescript variation in sounds is a major turn-off. It also sucks that Mandarin is not the only language. Most films seem to be from Hong Kong, and those speak Cantonese.

Do you mind explain why tones are difficult for you? I'm just curious since as a native speaker, I didn't think of this in any way.

 

Grammar wise, yes, for example, there's not tense, which will make me sometimes say something like "I go out yesterday", which indeed sounds funny. Talking about Cantonese and Mandarin, it's quite difficult to each other even you know one of them since it doesn't really help you, but it will actually make things very confusing. I must learn Mandarin (educational standard) even though I grew up with Cantonese. However, if I was not in this type of situation, I would probably never learn the other one.

Share this post


Link to post
Posted (edited)

I'm fluent in English and Auslan (Australian Sign Language). I also know some ASL and International Sign (which is mostly ASL anyway), so basically I can manage to have a conversation with most deaf people around the world.

Share this post


Link to post
On 8/12/2020 at 12:19 PM, MFG38 said:

Been meaning to start learning Japanese. Mostly because I want to visit Japan one of these days, and understanding the language is a huge benefit.

 

If you'd like it to be an educational trip, there are some short-term language courses and summer programs available in Japan that you could take advantage of. That of course means that the trip would last at least a month or two.

Share this post


Link to post

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×