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AndrewB

Big piece of pi...

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Pi is very interesting. The last few days I've come up with a couple of approximations, for example:
1977646078/629504298

8769956796^(1/20)

789578687047901181^(1/36)

and

68342776146017258398967520978^(1/58)

I also have a file with 50,000,000 digits of Pi which I calculated with PiFast in some 15 minutes.

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I'm sorry, but who exactly needs a number that precise?

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Andrew: Where do you find this stuff?
Fredrik: You have too much time on your hands.

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For practical purposes, 355/113 is quite good, and easy to remember. The next fraction that is more accurate involves, IIRC, two five-digit numbers.

DooMBoy: before you ask, I remember that from a boring textbook on number theory I skimmed through when I was a maths undergraduate. I decided to skip that course. :)

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I memorized it this far: 3.1415926535829. Don't ask how, as I'm not sure.

To get it, don't you just take some measurements off a real, true circle, and devide? Or is this wishful thinking?

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TeamKill said:

I memorized it this far: 3.1415926535829. Don't ask how, as I'm not sure.

To get it, don't you just take some measurements off a real, true circle, and devide? Or is this wishful thinking?

3.14159265358979323846264338327950288...

I remember this long banner that was in my Algebra class that consisted of 50+ digits of pi which went from one end of the wall to the other. That above is only about 1/3 of what the banner had. :)

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"The Joy of Pi"

Well, what a uncanny term as I see it.

"It's been a fellow traveler in mathematical history," said Peter Borwein, a mathematics professor at Simon Fraser University in Burnaby, British Columbia, who once held the record for calculating pi to about 2 billion decimal places.

"It isn't so much, 'Does anyone really care what the 1.24 trillionth decimal place is?' -- probably not -- but the stuff that's been discovered in the process."

...And I thought I needed a life...

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Lutarez said:

3.14159265358979323846264338327950288...

3.14159265358979323846264338327950288419716939937510... you mean. By the way, 50,000,000th decimal digit: 4.

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Fredrik said:

68342776146017258398967520978^(1/58) ... etc.

Fredrik, if you're going to waste your time on stuff like this, at least devote it to a useful number, such as koppa:

2 x (sum for r even and positive of r^-r) = koppa = integral from 0 to 1 of (x^-x) - (x^x) wrt x

[I wish the forum software had an equation editor.]

It starts off 0.507855...

And yes, the fact that the two quantities are equal has been proven analytically. I'm not sure whether the integral or the sum will provide a quicker method for evaluating it to many decimal places.

If you find a use for koppa, give me some credit, OK?

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DOOM Anomaly said:

...man, and I thought those guys in that article needed a life... :P

DOOM Anomaly
Posts: 1326
Registered: 08-02

Hmm.

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Grazza said:

DOOM Anomaly
Posts: 1326
Registered: 08-02

Hmm.

Ahh, my good friend irony. :D

DooMBoy said:

Heh, I see where Grazza's going with this...

yeah, its obvious....hes jealous of my stature.

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Y'know, I bought this calculator (scientific, double display) at the beginning of the semester. It has like a dozen physical constants accessbile from a function key, crap that would have been really useful to me for my Physics class (stuff like Avagrado's number, or the charge of an electron, or the mass of elementary particles). And yet I idn't realize that thing was there until the fourth midterm exam. Go figure.

Anyway, back on topic.

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Grazza said:

[I wish the forum software had an equation editor.]

Yeah, that would be a real good use of my time for a Doom forum :P

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Lutarez said:

3.14159265358979323846264338327950288...

I remember this long banner that was in my Algebra class that consisted of 50+ digits of pi which went from one end of the wall to the other. That above is only about 1/3 of what the banner had. :)

Heh, we had one of those too, but I only know 3.14159. ^_^

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The fun thing about pi is that you could make up any digits you want for its decimal places (for instance, the 461 millionth place is a 6), and all but the biggest geeks on the planet will never know the difference.

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When a geek is mocking your bullshit knowlege of pi, which one of you is more pathetic? :P

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Fredrik said:

Here is a very interesting page.

Thats the most insane thing ive seen ever since the alternate quadratic fomula almost destroyed my brain.

I know a guy whos memorized the thing up to 250 places. Theres really no point unless they figure out a pattern, unfortunateley theres very little that can be done about finding patterns no matter how much raw power you put into it

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Y'mean the quadratic form as a diagonalizable matrix?

That reminds me, my linear Algebra final is Monday...

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This is what helps me remember the digits of PI:

How I need a drink, alcoholic of course, after two heavy lectures involving quantum mechanics...

Count the amount of letters of each word ---> PI!

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It's frightening to think that Unversity Grants get spent on such wastes of time.

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