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Preference of OS

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I've wondered what operating system people on the Doomworld forums use and why, as well as their opinions on other operating systems.

Personally, I think GNU/Linux is way better than any Windows version, for many reasons, but I've been too lazy to switch from Windows 10, plus idk how to compile things and many applications I use don't have native Linux ports or don't work well in Wine :/

 

But what do you guys use?

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The best one. By which I mean dual-booted Linux and Windows 7. Best of both worlds, really.

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Lubuntu- coming from a windows bg my whole life until the last seven months. Don’t regret the switch at all even though Linux had a learning curve.

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I've used Slackware Linux since 2002, used it as my primary OS since about 2004, and my only  OS for a few years now.  Needless to say, I prefer Linux, specifically Slackware :-P

 

I have an odd fascination with both Plan9 and AmigaOS, too. Sometimes I run those in VMs.

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AmigaOS was the first operating system I ever used, although I was young enough that I needed help from mum to use it properly.

 

Got a Windows 95 machine one Christmas, and have used Windows operating systems since then. I've had one machine each running Windows 98, Windows XP (I think?) and Windows 7. I'm now on my second Windows 10 machine.

Other OSes that I've used include the Classic Mac OS machines at my primary school (can't remember which version, not a huge fan of Apple!), the Acorn machines at my secondary school(!), and that time in my 20s when the only computer I had access to was my friend's Ubuntu PC.

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5 hours ago, Omniarch said:

The best one. By which I mean dual-booted Linux and Windows 7. Best of both worlds, really.

 

My personal computer has GNU/Linux as a primary OS, and Win7 as a secondary OS.

 

I change the linux distro regularily.

I was on Debian + Budgie desktop for a bit more than a year, before switching to Bunsenlabs one or two months ago.

Very interesting, it was formally called Crunchbang/#!, it's basically Debian+Openbox with well-done configuration tools.

 

Those recent years, I've used Sparkylinux, elementary, MX Linux...

More briefly antiX, KDE Neon for a few days...

I've also tested funky stuff like Clear Linux (some crazy shit from Intel).

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2 minutes ago, soner du said:

My personal computer has GNU/Linux as a primary OS, and Win7 as a secondary OS.

 

I change the linux distro regularily.

I was on Debian + Budgie desktop for a bit more than a year, before switching to Bunsenlabs one or two months ago.

Very interesting, it was formally called Crunchbang/#!, it's basically Debian+Openbox with well-done configuration tools.

 

Those recent years, I've used Sparkylinux, elementary, MX Linux...

More briefly antiX, KDE Neon for a few days...

I've also tested funky stuff like Clear Linux (some crazy shit from Intel).

I've only ever used Ubuntu as my distro, since the extensive GUI is helpful to a linux noob like myself, though I have subsequently developed an appreciation for CLIs. I keep a installation of Win7 around primarily for gaming purposes, since it's the OS I am most familiar with and is still widely supported.

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I'm mostly using Win7 for gaming too (for Torchlight 1, Titan Quest, Wrack...).

Also to test some windows-only browsers, such as the lovely Opera GX.

And for LaTeX publishing, I prefer MikTeX to TeXlive... (I know one can install MikTeX on linux, but I've never tried it)

 

Otherwise, GNU/Linux is perfect for my daily needs : browsing, gaming (Doom, Quake, Steam stuff...), music, etc.

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Windows 10 for reasons primarily relating to software compatibility.

 

I do wish Win10 had better compatibility with older games. Even running something like Doom 3 becomes somewhat of a hassle with having to fiddle with compatibility modes, and even then, compatibility mode isn't a foolproof workaround. That aside, my experience with Win10 has been relatively problem-free, and the few problems I have had were pretty quick and painless to fix. And the OS can be optimized and tweaked - I have a habit of running O&O ShutUp 10 after every update to turn off all the unnecessary features.

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My own computer uses a 32-Bit version of Windows 7* since it's so archaic, even if I did have a computer that has more power than the Antikythera Mechanism, I would still not really want to use Windows 10 since it's just a far shittier version of 7 full of mandatory bloatware and unnecesary forced updates. However if I did have a proper computer that didn't screech in agony and reach 90-99% resource usage when I opened 4 Chrome tabs and 2-3 programs, I'd probably try out KDE Neon (Because I like KDE's look.) or at least install KDE on some other Ubuntu-based distro. Since that way I'd have a good looking desktop enviroment (Unlike Windows 10's shell whose graphics and look seem to have been designed by kindergardeners.) AND use a distro that is far more likely to have a bunch of support for it in case I encounter any issues, plus it would just make it simpler and easier for me to use without requiring a degree in computer science to make a new file.

I do already have a live installation of Linux Mint on a thumb drive though, which I use as a portable computer.

*The processor is 64-Bit but I can't reinstall Windows 7 on it because I'd lost a bunch of data I didn't even know I needed or thought of backing up until AFTER my disk was wiped.

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5 hours ago, CivilianM91 said:

Lubuntu- coming from a windows bg my whole life until the last seven months. Don’t regret the switch at all even though Linux had a learning curve.

 

I really want to be comfortable with Linux, but there's way too much of a learning curve for me. As it turns out, I'm not fluent in using computers, I'm fluent in using Windows.

 

I dual-booted Manjaro? a few months ago, and didn't give it too much space on the partition. It somehow managed to fill up the entire space even while I wasn't doing anything -- free space kept going down until 0 bytes. No idea what happened and I didn't like it. Also, I don't understand the package managers and where shit gets installed -- it feels very chaotic.

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2 hours ago, maxmanium said:

 

I really want to be comfortable with Linux, but there's way too much of a learning curve for me. As it turns out, I'm not fluent in using computers, I'm fluent in using Windows.

 

I dual-booted Manjaro? a few months ago, and didn't give it too much space on the partition. It somehow managed to fill up the entire space even while I wasn't doing anything -- free space kept going down until 0 bytes. No idea what happened and I didn't like it. Also, I don't understand the package managers and where shit gets installed -- it feels very chaotic.

Chaos is a good word for it ha. Linux really is an acquired taste. I love windows but I was so sick of how 10 was running on my low-end laptop I just took the plunge. 


I miss the conveniences of Windows sometimes; Things are much more straight forward. But if you have a decent package manager and don’t mind googling command lines for the terminal you can more or less get Linux to sing exactly how you’d like. 
 

Edited by CivilianM91

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Arch BTW

 

I have to use Windows for work-related software, as it's not compatible with Linux, and I don't want to run it through WINE... But for everything else, Linux

 

 

2 hours ago, maxmanium said:

 

I really want to be comfortable with Linux, but there's way too much of a learning curve for me. As it turns out, I'm not fluent in using computers, I'm fluent in using Windows. 

 

I dual-booted Manjaro? a few months ago, and didn't give it too much space on the partition. It somehow managed to fill up the entire space even while I wasn't doing anything -- free space kept going down until 0 bytes. No idea what happened and I didn't like it. Also, I don't understand the package managers and where shit gets installed -- it feels very chaotic.

 

The path for where executables gets installed is similar to Mac OS, if you're familiar at all with Mac... /usr/share/applications. Once you learn your way around the terminal, though, you'll know why there's not a lot of emphasis on the folder for applications. I practically never actually visit that folder thanks to a few commands. No longer necessary

 

You're right though, package managers can be a bit convoluted for beginners, as there are so many of them. Thankfully, though, distros like Manjaro and Ubuntu, the "newbie" distros, come installed with GUI software centers similar to the google play store, or the microsoft store, etc. These are great until you decide to learn the few commands (install/uninstall/list) involved with managing software through the terminal, which is completely and utterly worth it

 

As for your space problem, my guess is it has something to do with your dual-boot... People have notoriously had a lot of weird issues with dual booting, especially if it's off the same hardware drive. My recommendation would be to try it on a virtual machine, or buy an external drive

 

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I regularly use Ubuntu, MacOS and Windows, roughly in that order.

 

I use Ubuntu since Linux is ideal for my job. I've had a lot of problems with it, on my third re-install now and upgrading to a new version has gone badly twice. The power "management" is useless even after mucho tweaking to completely power off my GPU (a ballache in itself) and fiddling with powertop. I get maybe 60% off a charge compared to Windows. But once everything is working, I like Ubuntu as an OS; the desktop/window management is nice as bundled. The package management on Linux generally is awesome, and the set of terminal utilities, sed, grep, tail, awk and co are fantastic. It's just a bit more fucking about than I'd like. For me, an OS should be like running water or electricity, I don't want to think about how it works the same way I don't care how the water gets to the bathroom I'm in, I just want a shower. 

 

MacOS is my least favourite. The window management is abysmal, they don't even get the basics right. Maximisation is inconsistent, fullscreen seems like it was hacked in. I had to install third party software just to quickly dock windows around by keyboard etc. Homebrew is the worst package manager I've ever used, slow as hell, I don't even know how they manage it. On the other hand Spotlight is fantastic, Big Sur looks great, the animations are slick and the whole thing has a solid feel. Cannot overstate how much I love that I never seem to reboot my Macbook, I just flip it open and it's there- exactly as it should be.

 

Then there's Windows. I'm probably just used to it, but I like Windows. Parts of it are stupid and it's a visual design frankenstein, but it loads quickly and is responsive, the basics like window management work really well. Of the two main consumer OSs, I appreciate that they care about backwards compatibility compared to MacOS. I can still run obscure audio software from the early 2000s. I'm sure the Windows approach is a huge development burden, but I think breaking everything that hasn't been updated recently the way Apple does is immoral. It's deleting history.

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I use Windows 10 and various macOS X versions daily. I had a blank m.2 ssd and had planned on installing some form of Linux for a dual boot scenario, but after a lot of research (clearly still not enough) I just installed a bunch of games on it. I feel like I need to personally know someone who's into it already who can somewhat guide me, and I don't have a practical reason for trying it out, other than curiosity. There are so many versions that I never got past figuring out which one to use.

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5 hours ago, MFG38 said:

Even running something like Doom 3 becomes somewhat of a hassle with having to fiddle with compatibility modes

Doom3 absolutely does not need compatibility mode under Windows 10. Either you are running compatibility mode when you don't which is a greater source of your problems, or you've set something up that's giving you trouble elsewhere like a bunk driver of some shitty overlay program. 

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Windows is obviously the most compatible OS with everything, but ReactOS is a pretty good alternative (And it's easy to use unlike other OSes) I personally have an old Windows XP computer that I use for older games (Except Doom) and a dual-boot laptop with Windows 10 and ReactOS installed. If you want to switch from Windows 10 or whatever, ReactOS is very good since its interface is basically Windows's, but without the million DINGS and programs taking 2 minutes to load for some reason. Oh, and if you are into programming, it's open source, so you can customize it I suppose. It does (Or used to?) BSOD more than Windows ever did though, just a warning.

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I used Windows XP for many years. But few months ago i bought renewed HP Elitebook 8460p with i5 2520m cpu and it had installed Windows 10 Pro x64 on SSD. I have to admit that it works damn good and never lag. Even updates do last only few minutes. Most of old games works on it without issues. I even ran unpatched, out of the box version of Quake 2 in OpenGL without compatibility mode (thanks to old Intel HD 3000 GPU i think). Hell, even Diablo (1996) works. Only things i miss from Windows XP is Yamaha S-YXG50 WDM (vst version is buggy, need restart too often) and correctly working MS GS Wavetable Synth.

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2 hours ago, Edward850 said:

Doom3 absolutely does not need compatibility mode under Windows 10. Either you are running compatibility mode when you don't which is a greater source of your problems, or you've set something up that's giving you trouble elsewhere like a bunk driver of some shitty overlay program. 

 

Must've misremembered then. It has been a while since I ran Doom 3 on this machine.

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Use Windows 10 for 5 years. And I think that isn't bad OS. 

 

For retrogaming I use Windows 98 that installed in my old PC. It works good, errors get only sometimes. Next to Windows 98 I installed Windows 2000, that I never used in my childhood, but watched like my cousin used it in his PC in 2006. Windows 2000 likes a Windows XP, but with design from Windows 9x and NT 4.0. Good alternate of XP for old PC.

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Debian GNU/Linux. I love Linux, and Debian is the best distro I have used - it's stable, almost never needs a reboot, package management is great, and customization goes very smoothly. As a bonus, Freedoom and a few Doom source ports are available in the repository.

 

I only really have two problems with Linux at the moment. First, it doesn't have the same level of support for commercial or proprietary software as Windows, which, despite what the face in my avatar might say, is often essential. Second, the fact that Linux seems to have three replacements for every OS component is great for customization, but it tends to cause bugs due to compatibility issues. So once in a while, I do have to use Windows 10. I can use it when I need to use it, but as a daily OS I absolutely can't stand it.

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On 1/24/2021 at 7:04 AM, CivilianM91 said:

Lubuntu- coming from a windows bg my whole life until the last seven months. Don’t regret the switch at all even though Linux had a learning curve.

Ditto. I've been on Lubuntu for about 4 years now. I have to do a web search from time to time in order to learn how to do something, but that's so much better than the feeling of helplessness that comes with a walled garden.

 

Just last night my wife needed to use her scanner for the first time in ages, but on her new M1 Macbook it's not going to happen. It took me a couple of web searches but I got it going fairly easily on my Lubuntu laptop.

 

I see GNU/Linux as something akin to tech permaculture, where Microsoft and Apple promote consumerism and waste in order to drive private profits. Yes, we need innovation too, but we also need some checks and balances. I don't preach Linux to Apple users, but I think those of us who can should support community-based alternatives to proprietary software.

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I use windows, but I want to change to ubuntu, I just need something to open word, powerpoint, excel and all that stuff, cuz school uses that. I've heard of wine but I'm not sure if I should change...

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Generally use Linux, Windows, macOS in the descending order of most used to least used. One thing I liked the most about macOS is that it is easier and quicker to install applications than on Linux and Windows. The app container system in macOS also reduces the likelihood of bugs.

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I use Arch Linux with the GNOME desktop. It runs everything I ever need and gets out of my way to do so.

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I use Arch Linux on my main machine, and on ancient computers and server PCs, I use Debian. For things that are only for Windows 10, I will run them in a Virtual Machine.

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11 minutes ago, Aaron Blain said:

@JuanchoES Installing a web browser on Debian/Ubuntu:

apt search 'web browser'

sudo apt-get install midori

Its a joke

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