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fuzzytrick

What is the internet to you nowadays?

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I don't use social media cept Youtube and I still waste a LOT of time on the internet.

 

Being here since 2005, 2012 really was a turning point (not /the/ but one of many) with Megaupload being shutdown and corporations declaring war to Free internet. I still remember the aftermath: mass paranoia that every download site would be closed, links staying up 30 min at most, etc.

 

Nowadays, as others have pointed out, the internet makes me wanna hang out more LOL

 

Overall, I would like to do the following:

  • Having a free cellphone
  • Using email more (no need to create privacy-oriented messaging protocols)
  • Degoogling my life
  • Having more off-the-wire goals (exercising, praying, swimming, etc.)

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I have surfed the web for a long time as I’ve aged, as technology advanced, as the internet became more accessible, for many now an integral part of their lives, and have seen the good, the bad, and the ugly that is the internet. It’s what you make of it.

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The net used to be a fun and wondrous place back when I was a kid. It's hard to believe I've been a netizen for about... probably 20 years now??? Forums were always the most fun place, and I still think forums are... usually ones constructed like this (not a fan of Reddit's structure, feels too impersonal and messy). Back then, most bickering were over silly topics, nowadays, the net is extremely hostile when it doesn't need to be. Social media doesn't really sit with me because the way it's structured is just... ehh... not very engaging, not very customizable, it's very boring and not the least bit friendly. I legit only use Twitter to post updates about the progress of the games I'm making + voice actor scouting, that's about it these days. I don't dare look at my timeline, I just go straight to my own page, post, and that's it. Sometimes RT stuff occasionally from a friend or the official page of a video game I'm playing. deviantART used to be a fun place, but the new layout is still confusing and it's so hard to put things in groups and... it's just... not fun anymore, hard to find things, to connect. This doesn't mean the net is a total wasteland, of course, like any plot to a post-apocalyptic outcome, there's safe havens and survivors... lol I know I'm dramaticising things. But generally, thinking of how the internet spiraled is making me sad, and has made me think of where did this all begin? I feel like things really took a plunge in 2019, and then 2020 and onward showed me it can get 100x worse so...

 

But I am thankful for messaging apps, e-mail, forums that are still kickin' like Doomworld, and the like. And despite YT's unneeded changes over the years, at least it's mostly still easy to navigate and weirdly enough, the comment section isn't as toxic. Like man, I can see the same post on Twitter and YT's community section on a page, and the difference in the comments is like night and day. I don't get the lack of internet etiquette these days, just talk like you do in real life, it's not that hard, or do these people really have an inner beast they have to unleash now and again? I honestly feel really bad for them since I'm not actually sure what they think to gain by being this way. I'd like to say it's just a bunch of emo 12 year olds, and they'll grow out of it, but then you have adults doing the same thing -- or worse -- and I just sigh haha. 

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Kinda boring and soulless, if we're talking about memes and media content.
Too many copyright fighters and stuff....
But one thing I love in modern internet, at least in your western segment, it's respectful treatment and tolerance.

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3 hours ago, Vanilla+Unicorn said:

But one thing I love in modern internet, at least in your western segment, it's respectful treatment and tolerance.

Boy, oh boy, you haven't set foot on Twitter and Reddit, have you?

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1 hour ago, Panzermann11 said:

Boy, oh boy, you haven't set foot on Twitter and Reddit, have you? 

I did, but they still have rules, I think.
Twitter under Musk maybe already is a past story, but Reddit - idk, people are joking about community, but I haven't seen there controversies, I guess it depends on groups which you subscribe

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I messed with the internet since the late 90s as a kid - probably too young. 

 

I started off on forums, Newgrounds.com, and making a bunch of Geocities sites for random fandoms. 

 

Then and now, the internet has always been a place to satisfy my ADHD cravings that I struggle to satisfy offline. I hate sounding disparagingly about this, but I think it was 2010s or so once "normies" got online through social media - your parents and aunts and uncles on Facebook, the bros and preppy kids getting on - that the internet started its decline. Which isn't to say that the internet was always a great place, but that during that tideshift thats when advertisements and marketing decided to overtake most facets of the internet. 

 

I'm able to learn more than ever through the internet! But one bad turn and I'll get stuck in a dopamine-loop through negative engagement, which is a design-choice for a lot of spaces.

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Complete global centralization. People crowd into a few select websites, which give them (the websites) the power to make all the worst decisions imaginable, and no one can do a damn thing about it since there is little actual competition. What? You don't like YouTube making dumb decisions? Oh well, live with it. Also, a lot of websites' UI have gone down the gutter (ex. Newgrounds, their UI is ugly and borderline dysfunctional). I know there's still plenty of good in the web these days, but there's also so much junk and slop and bloat you have to struggle through. 

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I spent most of my childhood in a rural area with an extremely poor internet connection with parents that didn't really want me using it much even when it did work (something I'm now quite grateful for) and didn't get a smartphone until I was 17, I'm 27 now. I miss how deliberate it felt to use the internet to look something up or to talk to someone, it felt like an exciting event and an opportunity. My habits absolutely changed around the end of high school and some time later I eventually realised I was addicted to being on social media, and some of the more interesting parts of that realisation were confronting the fact that I was constantly finding myself on a site/app when I had made absolutely no conscious decision to set out to do so, and the fact that I wasn't remotely enjoying myself or feeling like I was benefiting, I was really just mindlessly doing it out of habit for no real reason I could name, and I was doing it for a really dumb amount of time. I couldn't believe how much mentally better I felt when I reduced how much I used social media by about 95%, and also how unexpectedly difficult it was to do that.

 

It's kinda like a supermarket, it's mostly filled with complete bullshit that is horrible for you and conveniently at your fingertips but if you ignore the mass of garbage in the middle and hang out around the edges you're likely to find all the healthy beneficial stuff and you're way better off, and there's some really cool stuff there. The internet is a wonderful tool but most of it completely sucks, and it's frustrating how much it feels like you have to push it to make it work for you.

 

Kinda but not really an aside, over the past 12-18 months or so I've been playing a bunch of 1994 wads and I have unexpectedly really loved reading through a bunch of the old text files. I wasn't around to live through this myself but using computers and the internet around that time period seems to have been so much more of an exciting and special experience, and occasionally a bit of that magic shines through in what someone wrote back then that I get to read today, and does make me sad that I'll never know what that was like. Computers and the internet are technological miracles and it really sucks how much ridiculous stuff like dumb internet drama things being essentially engineered to addict you and advertise to you and as much as possible have poisoned so much of it for so many people, it ought to be way better than it is IMO. 

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On 6/30/2023 at 4:15 AM, fuzzytrick said:

Having grown up with the internet, I often felt it had become indispensable. A power or internet outage used to drive me nuts 10 years ago, when I just couldn't picture doing anything that's not on the over here. Using a computer without network felt boring as well.

 

In the past few years, especially with the growth of infinite scrolling apps, I slowly started to notice how my time here is simply not fun anymore. I use the internet because I need to, and not because I want to. Besides the essentials: instant messengers, video calling, e-mails, internet banking and maps; everything else is just noise that adds nothing to my life. Instead of the dread I used to feel when internet was out, I now feel liberated. Besides some places that have retained that old net feel, such as forums (including Doomworld), the concentration of content on a few major platforms has made it a lesser experience.

 

So, what has internet become for you? What's the stuff you use it for; do you still have fun around here?

 

I 100% agree. Well, maybe 90%. I think I'm still pretty annoyed by internet outages, but yes the web has been going sharply downhill the past 10 years, for a number of reasons:

 

1) Centralization of the Web. The rise of social media meant the death of a lot of smaller "mom and pop" sites and personal blogs. Forums like Doomworld still exist but they're rarer and the minority. Most are sparsely populated or ghost towns. When I was growing up, I remember "your personal space" on the web was having your own website, but today nobody would dream of that, even though the bare minimum HTML code needed to know is itself obsolete thanks to website generators like wix. You must put your personal info on social medias. Let all power to communicate digitally be inside the walled garden of a corporate big brother.

 

2) Google's monopoly means it has slowly and gradually eroded the utility of search results, in order to keep you on Google longer and hopefully never leave to another site at all (instant answers, related questions, etc.) However, even on privacy alternatives like DuckDuckGo and Brave, the results of search engines are just really terrible nowadays. You can never find what you want, and they nearly always find a way to misinterpret your queries into the opposite meaning of what was intended. Half the time, putting things in quotes for literal terms or a dash in front to exclude certain results doesn't work anymore. The only thing you can find in search results today is either super mainstream websites you likely already know the domain name of (e.g. Wikipedia, youtube, reddit, etc.) or it's major media/news publications and articles. Or it's a.i.-generated bullshit articles that are "search engine optimized" so they somehow always rank at the top despite being totally useless.

 

3) Web Design. God I can't stress this enough every web site has become so horribly designed, particularly since around 2016/2017. This all started with the myth of "mobile first." The narrative goes something like this: lots of people have smartphones. (Apparently desktop, laptop, and tablet users ceased to exist in their minds). Therefore, smartphone web sites are better than desktop ones (not true, they always have been and always will be inferior) but since we're too lazy or cheap to make 2 websites, let's make every website into a mobile-only website.

 

What is a "mobile-only website?" aka "mobile-first" or "responsive" (I know those are all different in shades but they are de facto the same.) Something where everything is ultra-zoomed in with no way to zoom out. With fixed-width barriers, ludicrous amounts of wasted excessive white space; headers, footers, images, even titles that occupy the whole screen; and websites with obscene amounts of vertical scrolling. Keep all of your buttons hidden inside a hamburger menu, even though you clearly have more than enough room in a horizontal header at top or vertical column on left margin to just let those buttons be there. Nope, keep them hidden anyway. Instead of putting promotional material on the side of your website, beg for people to subscribe/click/do action in a pop-up as soon as they land on your site, blocking out everything else. (Do these ever work? I instinctually go for the X button before even reading it. And pop-ups just antagonize visitors, making them less likely to do the action.)

 

The assumption is that all of these changes are somehow beneficial on mobile phones, due to the smaller screen. But (apart from the hamburger menus which are good on smartphones but not anywhere else) this simply is a fallacious assumption. These characteristics make for awful websites on computers and laptops, on tablets, and yes, especially on phones too. Smartphones have had since the beginning ability to zoom in and out. This is a necessary feature because it lets you see the whole page at a glance, even if text looks tiny, then you can zoom in on what part you specifically want to see. 

 

So you don't need giant size buttons and images to help mobile users. Mobile browsers already had a perfectly fine solution for that, which is just zoom in till the button is big enough to click, or the text is big enough to read.

 

With an infinite scroll, you remove the user's ability to quickly scan the page for most useful information. My bet is some clueless idiot looked at usage statistics from web traffic on his site, noticed that vertical scroll sites resulted in higher "engagement metrics" because people stayed on page longer, and then erroneous concluded this meant more people like his site. Well, no more people are there longer because you just made the site a lot harder to use and navigate or read anything, because I can only read 3 words at a time (hyperbole but you get the idea) before having to scroll more. That's like saying you're a better public speaker when your audience listens to you longer, but you only speak one sentence every minute, so they have to be there 10 minutes just to hear one paragraph.

 

That's why despite having possibly the smallest smartphone in the world, on old iPhone SE that was the iPhone 5 size (ironic that the iPhone 5 was considered comically tall when it came out, and now it's a midget) I hate mobile websites on that phone. I always request desktop website, which 9/10 times doesn't even do anything anymore, in which case I use reader mode in order to remove junk and make text small and zoomed out.

 

The notion that the above design is somehow "optimized" for any device, including smartphones, is ridiculous. It's crazy how phones these days are so massive in size, even removing bezels for maximum screen size, yet somehow it's never enough because the web sites displayed on those big screens are always much bigger, so you still get very little fitting on screen at any one time without tons of scrolling.

 

4) Self-serving interests

The web as intended by Sir Tim Berners-Lee was a network. Pages, and sites joined by links. The hyperlink is your connection throughout cyberspace. It's how you "surf" the web, seeing where you land as one interesting site links to another, to a third, a fourth, etc. Search engines need to crawl through links to order the web. But today, most websites would never link to an outside domain. Why would they ever do that? They're such desperate whores for attention, that if they're lucky enough to get anybody on their page, they want to make sure every link on the site just redirects to another page on the site, as a sort of self-promotion. Google created such a cutthroat competition for attention, and businesses need that search engine ranking to survive (Yellow Pages is long since dead) so they can't afford to link to other useful websites. They only use hyperlinks for selfish purposes.

 

5) Death of Adobe Flash Player 

I'm not a tech expert, and as I understand it Flash allegedly had a number of security and compatibility issues, but I think the main reason Flash died is because Steve Jobs wanted it to. He said, no Flash allowed on an iPhone, and once the iPhone became successful enough with sufficient market penetration, web designers had to re-consider putting Flash on websites, because a huge portion of visitors would not be able to see that content (in theory. In practice there was Puffin browser on iOS that did support Flash, but whatever). So there was a long and gradual transition, and by the time Adobe officially pulled the plug, most sites had long since transitioned to HTML 5, and browsers had quietly been disabling it anyway.

 

But the thing is, Flash made the web feel more alive, imho. Not because of those crappy Flash games on places like miniclip (Remember that?) I just remember there being a lot more creativity and interactivity on websites during the 00s, the era of Flash design. Beautiful animations as opposed to static pages. Sites looked and felt far more inviting than both the primitive designs of the late 90s/early 00s and the sterile, uniform designs we have today. It's hard to explain in words but if you were there you remember. And if not, there's ruffle emulator extension you can get and look at old sites through archive.org

 

6) Designed to be Addicting

Youtube is a social media, but it's practically a necessity even if you're someone who hates social media. It's the definitive repository for things like music, trailers, tutorials, cooking recipes, free lessons/education, etc. This is because of the network effect. Everyone else is on it, so even if you prefer an alternative platform, it does little good if all the videos by users are on Youtube, much like a telephone is useless if nobody else has one. However, the site has been so hyper-focused on becoming bad for users but good at getting users addicted and stuck to screens for long times. Their algorithms promote the channels and videos that are complete assholes--the ones with clickbaity titles and obnoxious photos of them with wide eyes and open mouths. The ones that say "Top 10 this" and "The best/worst that" or "You won't believe..." it's tabloid trash on steroids. And unfortunately you're forced to encounter these systems to get anything out of it  at all. The web keeps getting harder and harder to find "the good stuff" in a lot of ways because they're so much crap to dig through.

 

I could probably go on, but you get the idea. I'm not a fan of the direction the web has been heading in. Imo, the web peaked around 2008-2014, but I would easily prefer even early/mid 00s web over today's web.

 

What amazes me is that I actually find myself turning to books--nonfiction, popular science, classic literature--more than the web for information. It seems almost odd or ironic. Not that I ever disliked books, I always appreciated reading in school, but I never really saw myself as wanting to pursue them outside that as a hobby. After all, anything you could want to know is out there online, right? But after getting so fed up with the absolute dearth of high quality information even from supposedly trustworthy sources like major news publications, I found myself thirsty for something written by intelligent authors. An oasis from the infinity of stupidity one encounters online. Plus reading a book is so much more relaxing because there's no other distractions. I don't care if that sounds pedantic, I don't mean it to be. I don't think reading inherently makes somebody superior or smarter--a book is just a medium, and its quality is determined by the author's. It can also be crap if the words inside are crap. But since I get to select what to read, I never have to encounter anything bad.

 

Books, unlike internet posts, have quality control. Ideas are well thought out, well-planned, go through numerous revisions, and are often eloquently written. There has to be a certain standard, because otherwise no publisher would spend money printing the book if it were low quality, and no consumer would spend money buying it. Ditto for movies/television versus Youtube videos. Where there's thought, effort, art, and skill you just get a higher chance of a product actually worth your time. The good thing about the web is that anybody can say anything, but the bad thing about the web is that anybody can say anything. "Democratizing" is a euphemism for no quality control or standards.

Edited by QuaketallicA

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20 hours ago, QuaketallicA said:

5) Death of Adobe Flash Player

 

Flash was a pain in the ass in Linux because it was a closed-source technology.

I prefer HTML5 that works like a charm.

 

Quote

Books, unlike internet posts, have quality control. Ideas are well thought out, well-planned, go through numerous revisions, and are often eloquently written. There has to be a certain standard, because otherwise no publisher would spend money printing the book if it were low quality, and no consumer would spend money buying it.

 

No, books have bankable control before quality control.

Look at what’s sold: pseudo-scientific bullshit books sell 100 times (a complete room in a bookshop) more than scientific or sceptic books (just one shelf with only vulgarization, moreover, contaminated with crap).

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I don't know guys, i can't help but be in awe of what the internet is. I mean sure, it's gotten pretty monopolised, carved up into thiefdoms, and polluted by seo. But on a more abstract level, it's astonishing. People can communicate next instantly all over the planet. Share ideas and art and whatever you can think of. Step off the giant sites/apps, and the wealth of interests and talents is incredible.

Are you interested in locomotives made in 1912 in Austria? You can bet there's somebody who's got a blog about them. You ever wondered how would it turn out of Buffy the vampire slayer met Jason Voorheese? Pretty sure somebody had the same idea, wrote it down, and published it. Do you have a rare health condition? There are people in similar predicament you can talk to. 

 

It's a tale as old as time. The hunger for money and power ruins everything. So just don't spend as much time in the spaces that are only there to make profit. The internet is more than facebook, twitter, youtube, and discord. Doomworld and doomwiki are great examples of places made for people

It's a shared passion, bringing people closer, and a repository of knowledge over a 30 years old game, and the art people made around it. 

There's this myth that's drilled into people's heads that without a profit motive, people wouldn't have a reason to do anything. Yet look around. How many people make free software for themselves and also for everybody else. How many people share art and collaborate to make something, to make the world a little better one step at a time. 

What were we talking about? Right, the internet. Yeah, it's pretty good, actually. 

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24 minutes ago, ducon said:

 

Flash was a pain in the ass in Linux because it was a closed-source technology.

I prefer HTML5 that works like a charm.

 

 

No, books have bankable control before quality control.

Look at what’s sold: pseudo-scientific bullshit books sell 100 times (a complete room in a bookshop) more than scientific or sceptic books (just one shelf with only vulgarization, moreover, contaminated with crap).

 

Yeah, I figured there was some technical issue with Flash. But it's just my opinion that websites looked better when they used it. Perhaps it's some of the artistic creativity that got lost in translation.

 

As for books, I did also say they're not inherently good or bad, just a medium. If the words inside are crap, it can still be crap. But I choose which books to read. Online you're forced to read every Tom, Dick, & Harry's opinion whether you'd like to or not. 

 

For e.g. the books I'm currently into are written by Richard Dawkins, Carl Sagan, Stephen Hawking, and George Orwell, to name a few. I know beforehand what kind of a book I'm getting into when I buy it, and I only seek out things which satisfy that intellectual itch. 

 

No doubt a lot of stuff made without quality controls is great (e.g. AVGN) and a lot that is on networks/cable is crap, and sometimes the network overlords foolishly cancel great shows way too early.

 

It's not perfect. But on average, I'm willing to bet you're way more likely to find quality material when there is a cost or barrier to entry. 

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22 minutes ago, Sneezy McGlassFace said:

I don't know guys, i can't help but be in awe of what the internet is. I mean sure, it's gotten pretty monopolised, carved up into thiefdoms, and polluted by seo. But on a more abstract level, it's astonishing. People can communicate next instantly all over the planet. Share ideas and art and whatever you can think of. Step off the giant sites/apps, and the wealth of interests and talents is incredible.

Are you interested in locomotives made in 1912 in Austria? You can bet there's somebody who's got a blog about them. You ever wondered how would it turn out of Buffy the vampire slayer met Jason Voorheese? Pretty sure somebody had the same idea, wrote it down, and published it. Do you have a rare health condition? There are people in similar predicament you can talk to. 

 

It's a tale as old as time. The hunger for money and power ruins everything. So just don't spend as much time in the spaces that are only there to make profit. The internet is more than facebook, twitter, youtube, and discord. Doomworld and doomwiki are great examples of places made for people

It's a shared passion, bringing people closer, and a repository of knowledge over a 30 years old game, and the art people made around it. 

There's this myth that's drilled into people's heads that without a profit motive, people wouldn't have a reason to do anything. Yet look around. How many people make free software for themselves and also for everybody else. How many people share art and collaborate to make something, to make the world a little better one step at a time. 

What were we talking about? Right, the internet. Yeah, it's pretty good, actually. 

 

Obviously yes, it still has a lot of merit, but it's also true that it's been going downhill over the years. 

 

Like I said, personal blogs are a rarity, because most people who would be bloggers want an audience, and if their audience is on social media, then that's where they'll be. Why pay for expensive domain costs when nobody is going to read or even find your website. Google and other search engines used to exist for the purpose of helping find those kind of sites, which they simply do not do anymore. Unless you have a very specific idea a priori of what kind of a forum or blog to look for, you likely won't ever see any results from those kind of websites anymore, assuming of course that they even exist or that they're not ghost towns if they do.

 

Although now that you mention it, I highly recommend the Buffy Boards. Great community, and still very active.

 

The thing about profit motive is it's necessary to do tasks you wouldn't want to do otherwise. Nobody goes into accounting because it's a fun job. But it pays well, and we need people to do the job. Profit's also necessary to do tasks in the most efficient way possible for society. People work for free on hobbies or passion projects, but if you run your passion like a business, i.e. in the most efficient, optimized way possible, you may start to hate the activity. You do your passion project for yourself first, not necessarily to serve the community.

 

Of course, that doesn't mean there aren't high quality volunteer work/non-profits. For e.g. Justin Guitar puts up high quality guitar lessons for beginners on the internet, 100% free and funded entirely by donations. He's an incredible instructor.

 

But for the most part, monetary incentive is necessary to get people to want to do a job they wouldn't want to do otherwise. If you're happy to do the work for free, then nobody will pay you for that work, because they don't need to. There's even a theory that some people follow where you should intentionally not have a job that's a passion, because those kinds of jobs are desirable and highly competitive, so the employer in theory can get away with lower income and worse benefits with longer hours, because if you don't like it, somebody else still will want it. They can get away with it because people like the work that much.

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1 hour ago, QuaketallicA said:

 

Obviously yes, it still has a lot of merit, but it's also true that it's been going downhill over the years. 

 

Like I said, personal blogs are a rarity, because most people who would be bloggers want an audience, and if their audience is on social media, then that's where they'll be. Why pay for expensive domain costs when nobody is going to read or even find your website. Google and other search engines used to exist for the purpose of helping find those kind of sites, which they simply do not do anymore. Unless you have a very specific idea a priori of what kind of a forum or blog to look for, you likely won't ever see any results from those kind of websites anymore, assuming of course that they even exist or that they're not ghost towns if they do.

 

Although now that you mention it, I highly recommend the Buffy Boards. Great community, and still very active.

 

The thing about profit motive is it's necessary to do tasks you wouldn't want to do otherwise. Nobody goes into accounting because it's a fun job. But it pays well, and we need people to do the job. Profit's also necessary to do tasks in the most efficient way possible for society. People work for free on hobbies or passion projects, but if you run your passion like a business, i.e. in the most efficient, optimized way possible, you may start to hate the activity. You do your passion project for yourself first, not necessarily to serve the community.

 

Of course, that doesn't mean there aren't high quality volunteer work/non-profits. For e.g. Justin Guitar puts up high quality guitar lessons for beginners on the internet, 100% free and funded entirely by donations. He's an incredible instructor.

 

But for the most part, monetary incentive is necessary to get people to want to do a job they wouldn't want to do otherwise. If you're happy to do the work for free, then nobody will pay you for that work, because they don't need to. There's even a theory that some people follow where you should intentionally not have a job that's a passion, because those kinds of jobs are desirable and highly competitive, so the employer in theory can get away with lower income and worse benefits with longer hours, because if you don't like it, somebody else still will want it. They can get away with it because people like the work that much.

I think you misunderstood my last point a little. 

If you have your own website, or blog, it's yours and you are in control. If you self-host, then it's all you. But that's a lot of work. So people move to platforms like facebook and all the others. It's convenient for the person who has something to say or show, and for people to see, and talk about it etc. But the platform is in charge. And the platforms want money. Money is keeping people glued to the site, and clicking on ads, buying subscriptions, coins, emotes, extending features, whatever. That's what i mean. That leads to purposefully bad design because bad design can make more money. Once people are on the platform, they're unlikely to move away because all their friends and/or content is there. 

People still use IRC. And will use it until the end of times. Because it's a great service with minimal upkeep cost, and no way for it to make money. It's made as a good service first and foremost. It's not gonna twist your arm to buy animated emojis or different colour name or whatever. 

 

If you take a look at the two doom wikis, for example. The doomwiki and the doom fandom wiki, one has a bad layout, borderline unusable search, and is full of ads, and the other one is just good. More information, more up to date, better overall functionality, and operated entirely by volunteers. One makes money, and is providing objectively worse service. 

 

What do you think would be the cost analysis of idgames, the heaven of all doomwads? 100% loss. It would be pennies to id software / zenimax / xbox / microsoft but it's still in 100% red numbers since its inception. It's run by a couple guys as a passion project on servers long forgotten by the rest of the company. If the management knew , and cared for cutting losses, they'd axe it without second look. But it's an invaluable service to all of us. It's a living museum of doom creation throughout decades of history. 

Whenever you introduce money to the equation, things get messy. If they're the primary reason, things get invariably worse. 

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9 hours ago, QuaketallicA said:

 

Yeah, I figured there was some technical issue with Flash. But it's just my opinion that websites looked better when they used it. Perhaps it's some of the artistic creativity that got lost in translation.

  

 

 

Flash died because it was shit. Today there's proper solutions offering the same kind of features.

The loss of quality you notice would have happened with Flash as well, it's just that the internet is not a place where quality can thrive, sooner or later the greedy people will come and ruin everything.

 

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On 7/4/2023 at 4:24 PM, Biodegradable said:

 

 

 

 

Did you guys forget that the internet is a lot more vast than just Twitter, Facebook, Reddit, YouTube, Twitch and Amazon? I feel like there's so many people online today who've allowed The Big Apps to convince them that they homogeneised the internet when they haven't. Sure, it's not The Wild West of the old days anymore, but have you actually gone exploring? When was the last time you just surfed the net? Refamiliarise yourselves with your own varied interests and go exploring! Remember watching goofy Flash cartoons on Newgrounds? It still fucking exists today! You can go and watch silly cartoons and play old Flash games right now! There's still gaming forums similar to Doomworld that exist regarding Half-Life, Fallout and heaps of other old games with active modding communities. How about literature and film? You can waffle about your favourite books on Goodreads or talk movies on Letterboxd!

 

There's an entire electronic universe out there for you to still discover.

You are missing the point, the people complaining about this already understand there are still places like that on the internet, they are literally in one. But places on the internet that aren't ad infested, tribal corporate hellscapes have become rarer than unicorns next to the sites you mentioned. Interesting or non-Hell sites make up a fraction of a fraction of a fraction of Twitters' userbase alone, let alone the other ones like Facebook.

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54 minutes ago, inkoalawetrust said:

places on the internet that aren't ad infested

 

Ever heard of adblock, fam? I haven't seen a single ad online in the last 10 years.

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The internet to me is what I use to play web games, watch YouTube videos and read my favorite webcomic's comment section (because the comic itself hasn't updated in almost a year)

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