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Infinite Ammunition

Join the Navy!

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In the navy!
something something the sea
In the navy!
something something you and me
In the navy!

heh, my knowledge of village people lyrics is lacking a bit

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Man, the sky in that video is so nice. I wish it could be like that here sometimes. :D

deathbringer said:

In the navy!
something something the sea

I think it was 'you can sail the Seven seas' but I may be wrong. :D

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Ralphis said:

I'm surprised nobody has made any 'semen ship' jokes yet


Sea men + Sea Eggs = Sea people [south park joke]

That's DN's job.

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BlackFish said:

Sea men + Sea Eggs = Sea people [south park joke]

That's DN's job.

nope sea men + sea people = sea-ciety

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Did we not make them remove the rays of sunshine from their flag? Y'know cause they're [the rays] evil.

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123 said:

Did we not make them remove the rays of sunshine from their flag? Y'know cause they're [the rays] evil.


I think that flag is only allowed on military vessels. Many countries got a seperate flag for their navy vessels.

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Yeh UK uses the Blue Ensign for commercial vessels, White Ensign for Royal Navy, flown at the stern, the Union flag (NOT Union Jack, no such flag) at the bow.

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Danarchy said:

Instead of American flags, the US ships have GAINT American flags.

Is that an acronym or did you mean to emphasize the word "giant?"

fodders said:

Yeh UK uses the Blue Ensign for commercial vessels, White Ensign for Royal Navy, flown at the stern, the Union flag (NOT Union Jack, no such flag) at the bow.

Can you explain where "Union Jack" came from, then?

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Ultraviolet said:

Can you explain where "Union Jack" came from, then?


It took alot of seamen to run the ship. They had to get it someway, and the union was willing to help in any way possible.

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Ultraviolet said:

Is that an acronym or did you mean to emphasize the word "giant?"

Emphasis.

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Ultraviolet said:

Is that an acronym or did you mean to emphasize the word "giant?"

Can you explain where "Union Jack" came from, then?

THE UNION FLAG - The national flag of the United Kingdom is worn as a Jack at the bow by all HM ships in commission when alongside or when 'dressed overall'. This is the only occasion when it is correctly called the Union Jack, although it is generally known by this name through common usage. It is also flown during Courts Martial and is the Distinguishing Flag of an Admiral of the Fleet.
A jack is a sea flag, a small flag, generally rather square in its proportions, flown from a flagstaff rigged on the bowsprit or stem of the vessel. The earliest known reference to a 'jack' of such a type occurs in 1633, the first reference to the Union (rather than the 'Britain' or 'British' flag) dating from 1625 - the Union Flag and the naval jack are much the same age. The jack was initially simply a particular instance of the Union Flag, but as the distinctive flag of warships it quickly became an exceptionally well-known instance.
Technically, all Union Jacks are Union Flags, but not vice versa. It is a fine point and one that was much argued over, but it is beyond question that the habit of treating the two terms as interchangeable developed early, and it would not be difficult to multiply instances of individuals who undoubtedly did understand the distinction nevertheless following common usage and using the term Union Jack when Union Flag is clearly meant.

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