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One of the definitions listed is "an attack from all sides", so I'm guessing that's the meaning id intended.

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I remember watching some medieval type movie in which there was this big mechanical obstacle course called the gauntlet, with all sorts of hazards that people would attempt to brave to show their toughness. I don't recall what it was. Maybe it was a television show; Hercules and/or Xena sounds about right, but who knows.

I'm pretty sure that's the inspiration for the name of the map, though. Snarboo and Lupinx are both right.

[edit] Ah, here's something relevant:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Running_the_gauntlet

This is likely the basic inspiration for the name.

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Word History: The spelling gauntlet is acceptable for both gauntlet meaning "glove" or "challenge" and gauntlet meaning "a form of punishment in which lines of men beat a person forced to run between them"; but this has not always been the case. The story of the gauntlet used in to throw down the gauntlet is linguistically unexciting: it comes from the Old French word gantelet, a diminutive of gant, "glove." From the time of its appearance in Middle English (in a work composed in 1449), the word has been spelled with an au as well as an a, still a possible spelling. But the gauntlet used in to run the gauntlet is an alteration of the earlier English form gantlope, which came from the Swedish word gatlopp, a compound of gata, "lane," and lopp, "course." The earliest recorded form of the English word, found in 1646, is gantelope, showing that alteration of the Swedish word had already occurred. The English word was then influenced by the spelling of the word gauntlet, "glove," and in 1676 we find the first recorded instance of the spelling gauntlet for this word, although gantelope is found as late as 1836. From then on spellings with au and a are both found, but the au seems to have won out.

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I read somewhere that a gantlet is something to do with junction boxes on railways. Although I very much doubt that is the meaning id intended.

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Gez said:

The earliest recorded form of the English word, found in 1646, is gantelope,


Somehow, I don't think "The gantelope" quite cuts it as a Doom level name.

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PhilibusMo said:

I read somewhere that a gantlet is something to do with junction boxes on railways. Although I very much doubt that is the meaning id intended.

I thought it was. Not like anything in Doom 2 resembles real life anyway.

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It's a misspelling of gauntlet, used in the context of an obstacle course rather than a glove.

E3M2 could have also been called the gauntlet :P

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Various areas are gantlet-like. Right after the start you can get attacked by the shotgun zombies behind the crusher windows and the zombies in the switch room, getting on the lift in the crate room can get you surrounded by imps, and the final area opens up to reveal chaingun zombies on each side.

Super Jamie said:
It's a misspelling of gauntlet,

A misspelling is a spelling that's not accepted, like mispeling or something. One (Funk & Wagmalls) dictionary I have specifically applies gantlet to the punishment (and thus by extension "attack from two or all sides") and train related acceptations, and gauntlet for the glove. Others just assume either variant in any context.

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myk said:

Various areas are gantlet-like. Right after the start you can get attacked by the shotgun zombies behind the crusher windows and the zombies in the switch room, getting on the lift in the crate room can get you surrounded by imps, and the final area opens up to reveal chaingun zombies on each side.

You seem to be talking about MAP04: The Focus here, not MAP03: The Gantlet.

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Likewise, E3M2 is to be questioned in the same way, simply because having looked up what a Slough is, you get two basic choices:

1) A muddy, swamp-like landscape.
2) A place in England

Neither of these would be "Grey, bleak stone maze" :P I think a lot of the titles are just what sounded cool at the time.

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Phobus said:

Likewise, E3M2 is to be questioned in the same way, simply because having looked up what a Slough is, you get two basic choices:

1) A muddy, swamp-like landscape.
2) A place in England


However Slough is a pretty hellish place.

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Phobus said:

1) A muddy, swamp-like landscape.
2) A place in England
"Grey, bleak stone maze"

But these are all the same thing! :P

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