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NerdKoopa

Possible Lego TC concept

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I've been experimenting with LeoCAD and LDView to make Lego themed textures and sprites for ZDoom. I'm even able to make animated enemies, as seen in this thread: http://www.doomworld.com/vb/wads-mods/64659-lego-soldier-enemy-test/
However, there was one style problem. When rendered in LDView, models meant for making textures look best when rendered with subtle dark grey outlines and subdued lighting. For textures it works better than other options, but it makes them look very cartoony. Models meant for making sprites look best without outlines and without subdued lighting, making them look more realistic. This created two clashing styles, so I decided to try going full cartoon. Below is a screenshot of a small texture/sprite test room as a proof of concept. What do you guys think? Should I kick this project into high gear? I'm thinking of a small four to six level WAD set on a cruise ship and a tropical island. Kinda like Duke Caribbean.

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For the flash states, are you going to draw a normal muzzle flash, or make the muzzle flash look like lego bricks as well? Also, it would be neat if you made the blood sprites look like the the small circle 1x1 1/3 height bricks.


I really like the concept, though. It's very colorful and could offer a lot of different environments. Are you just going to do island environments, or are you going to add other environments? I think a lego Wolfenstein style maze would be interesting.

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I Think I'm going with simple cartoony muzzle flashes, but without black outlines. As for stages, I think another option would be to have each level to take place in a different Lego set. One level for space Legos, one level for Lego city and so on. I'll see what I can do. This is still in a concept state with some textures and ideas.

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There are small flame pieces. I'm sure one of them makes a good muzzle flash. Stay true to the medium!

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I now have a working Lego version of the chainsaw, and some basic enemy designs (not functional just yet). I guess this is how it starts!

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There are not enough shades of yellow in the Doom palette to make the hands look good. I have to use skin tones.

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Make your own palette! It's pretty simple. I learned it from this tutorial. Inkworks is old, but actually does that job fine. SLADE3 allows you to modify colormap (not sure about palette) by exporting the Doom's one as .png, editing it and import back.

Making a TC is a great opportunity for custom palette, as you don't need to worry much about devaluating stock graphics.

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That is an awesome chainsaw. I couldn't imagine doing a better job with a lego chainsaw.

You should try to slip in either a Rock Raider or an Alpha Team type weapon in.

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scifista42 said:

Inkworks is old, but actually does that job fine. SLADE3 allows you to modify colormap (not sure about palette) by exporting the Doom's one as .png, editing it and import back.

SLADE 3 has palette tools too.

How to edit a palette with SLADE 3 (development builds):
1. Open your archive
2. Archive->New->PLAYPAL
Now you get a choice of palette to use as a base. The default selection is the one in the base resource archive (or a grayscale palette if you have not set a base resource archive); but you can select the palette from any of the Doom-engine games, several other vintage shooters, and some popular variants of the Doom palette. If you have a ready-made palette you want to use, don't bother and just keep the default. What's important is to have a palette entry.
3. So, you have a palette that you want to import. Let's say it's a GIMP palette like in the Vavoom forum tutorial. You're in luck! SLADE 3 can import them. Select the PLAYPAL lump that's been added. While the palette is displayed, a Palette menu is added. Go to Palette->Import from..., change the file type to Gimp Palette (.gpl), and navigate to your palette. It's read and imported into the PLAYPAL. You can also import palettes in the JASC format used by Paintshop Pro, or PNG palettes (a square grid of 16x16 colors), or comma-separated values, or raw RGB 888 format.
4. Now that you have a palette, you need to make it into a full-fledged PLAYPAL! Because as explained on the wiki, there are 14 (or 28 in Hexen) palettes in a PLAYPAL lump. Use Palette->Generate Palettes. SLADE 3 is the only tool I am aware of that can generate the full Hexen PLAYPAL range accurately.
5. Finally it's time for the COLORMAP! SLADE 3 can do it too. Palette->Generate Colormaps.

Now let's back off a little. Let's say instead of having a Gimp palette you want to import, you just want to tweak a little the normal Doom palette. For example, get rid of the pinks and obtain a yellow range instead. Palette->Tweak. Select a range by dragging the mouse cursor over it (you'll see it being surrounded by a white outline to show selection), then modify the Hue Shift, Saturation, and Luminosity sliders to your content. For example, take the second and third rows. Shift hue to 0.120, saturation to 200%, and luminosity to 120%. You now have a good yellow range instead of the pink range. Click OK to close that window, then click on Save to change the palette. If you want to modify another range, repeat the process.

There are other options, too: you can tint, colorize, or even invert the palette. They work just like Tweak: select a range, select the parameters (color by which to tint or colorize), then OK and save. If you do not select a range, the entire palette is affected (so you can shift the entire palette.)

Finally, if you want full precision: in the main palette view (not the small preview from tweak/colorize/tint/invert), you can right-click on any of the palette colors to change it. You'll get the standard color selection dialog. So you could edit each of the 256 colors this way if you want, but it might be a bit tedious.

Also note: since a full PLAYPAL has 14 (or 28) palettes, you can edit each of them individually. Let's say you want the nukage palette to be tinted blue instead of green as usual, nothing prevents you from modifying just that single palette. Use the arrow buttons to change which palette of the PLAYPAL lump you are currently editing. Note also that SLADE lets you reorder the PLAYPAL's palettes around (pull ahead/push back), duplicate a palette, delete one palette, delete all palettes except the one currently selected, etc. So Generate Palettes is useful because it's a simple and convenient way to create the full PLAYPAL range using the same values as Id Software did; but you could do it all by hand with your own preferences. If you aren't afraid of having special effects that won't work right in OpenGL renderers, you could make palette flashes with different values and have pain flashes that go black instead of red, item pickup flashes that make all colors more saturated instead of giving them a golden tint, etc.

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