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Doominator2

where did the names for Cacodemon and Mancubus come from.

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Cacodemon: http://www.thefreedictionary.com/cacodemon

The Doom wiki says on "Mancubus":
A fitting explanation for the name of the monster seems to be a bastardized combination of the termination of the medieval demon names succubus and incubus preceded by the syllable man-, possibly refering to the Latin verb manducāre, which means "to chew" or "to devour". Manducus is also the Latin word for glutton. It could also be based on the Latin word mancus, which means "maimed" or "with a crippled or missing hand", referring to the flamethrowers grafted onto its amputated forearms.

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Xaser said:

ManCubeBus. He's half-man, half-cube, and half-bus.

Half man, half cube, ALLLL bus, baby!

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I like to refer to Cacodemons as Langoliers, and Arch-Viles as Firewalkers. As for the Mancubus, I like to call them Gluttons not only because of their bulk, but because they also take a shitload of punishment.

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Piper Maru said:

I like to refer to Cacodemons as Langoliers, and Arch-Viles as Firewalkers. As for the Mancubus, I like to call them Gluttons not only because of their bulk, but because they also take a shitload of punishment.


Three SSG blasts worth of punishment!

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EvilNed said:

Three SSG blasts worth of punishment!


And than afterwards they crumble to the ground with a deluge of blood gushing fourth. And of all things, their green eyeballs roll out lol.

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I remember reading on a bestiary that Incubi and Succubi were considered to be male/female nightmare demons, accordingly, tormenting the sleep of virtuous women/men to lead them into temptation. They were pretty much "wet dreams" demons ;-)

This is considered mostly a medieval Christian "Fire & Brimstone" view, but the belief actually dates back to pagan ancient Rome. Even today, in some Romance languages (e.g. Italian) Incubo means nightmare, though now the root Succub- has taken up a different meaning (it's used in a passive sense, meaning being subservient to a more dominant personality, e.g. a man being succumbent to his wife/mother-in-law, but I'm digressing).

In any case, in that same source I read that a Mancubus was described as the offspring of an Incubus and a Succubus. Thus, if latin grammar was to be followed throughout, the plural of Mancubus would be Mancubi, though I know certain DW grammarians don't like that view :-p

As for "Cacodemon", that's a Greek word (Κακοδαίμων) literally meaning "Bad/ugly/evil demon".

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Krispy said:

Huh. I didn't think that Doomguy was black.


Where?

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It's the big butt pic with doomguy lodged up the mancubus's hoo-ha. You know the old stereotype that black guys like big asses.

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mancubus is manly counterpart of succubus, dont know what succu means. caco is like onomatopoetic word and well describes the sounds when it is spitting lightning

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I was thinking the same thing as Maes, but his view is certainly more educated. And yeah, I've tried looking up some of the names in the dictionary and got some answers.

A "Revenant" is someone who has returned, usually from the dead, according to my old computer's dictionary.

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It's arch-vile. Only one L.

Waffenak said:

mancubus is manly counterpart of succubus, dont know what succu means.

Succubus means "lay under". (I guess demons haven't heard of cowgirl positions.)

Waffenak said:

caco is like onomatopoetic word and well describes the sounds when it is spitting lightning

Not at all. Caco- means ugly/evil/unclean and otherwise bad. You can find it in other words like cacophony and more. "Cacodemon" basically mean "evil spirits".

Caco- is opposed by eu- (good, true) and also agatho- (good). A related notion is dys- or dis- (difficult, broken).

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The guys at iD most likely encountered the word cacodemon in the Advanced Dungeons & Dragons Player Handbook (1978). It's a 7th (or 8th) level Magic-user spell and the game (doom)is loosely based off of a D & D campaign that Carmack was running at the time; according to the book Masters of Doom.

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Krispy said:

It's the big butt pic with doomguy lodged up the mancubus's hoo-ha. You know the old stereotype that black guys like big asses.


You dunna be sayin' that me iz a nigga too, mah nigga?

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Gez said:

It's arch-vile. Only one L.


Succubus means "lay under". (I guess demons haven't heard of cowgirl positions.)


Not at all. Caco- means ugly/evil/unclean and otherwise bad. You can find it in other words like cacophony and more. "Cacodemon" basically mean "evil spirits".

Caco- is opposed by eu- (good, true) and also agatho- (good). A related notion is dys- or dis- (difficult, broken).


Caco evolves to kako in scandinavia and that makes it onomatopoetic to us, it sounds like coughing, hard to translate that thing to english

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Waffenak said:

Caco evolves to kako in scandinavia and that makes it onomatopoetic to us, it sounds like coughing, hard to translate that thing to english

It's more a function of the low-level connection between meaning and phonetics that exists with many other types of words as well. Words for things that are aesthetically displeasing are often phonetically harsh. Just say the word cacophonous. The word itself is cacophonous.

I wish I had some other examples handy but I forgot them all :P

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