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EdwunclerIII

most emotional parts of Doom 64?

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Joe667 said:

Whenever I fought a Pain Elemental. Doom 64 made me realize exactly what that enemy is: it's an evil, demonic parasite that literally eats peoples' souls.
It then forces them to fight for it.
I was reminded of this from its grotesque appearance: a messed-up indescribable floaty thingy with two stretched mouths...

And that laugh. That horrible, horrible laugh.


....

Please don't remind me of them.... they utterly terrify me. If not because of that horrible laugh...

They spawn the MOST EVIL enemy in Doom 64....

The Lost Souls.

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Oh I so want to play Doom 64 right and actually finish it.
But there is no sourceport for Doom64 EX
And my emulator on my phone doesn't work when I load the rom
And I don't have a PC anymore
And I ragequited when I encountered the ISAMM pit
If only D-touch could somehow run Doom 64

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DMGUYDZ64 said:

Wow wtf ..

Ok maybe the crying faces was a bad idea.

Still, I want a second chance to play Doom 64.

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Doomhuntress said:

source-port for Doom64 EX? uhh, Doom64 EX IS a source-port for Doom 64.

:P
I meant mobile sourceport.

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DMGUYDZ64 said:

Wow wtf ..


Blablabla?

I was talking about how terrifying the Lost Souls were...

Unless... you are scared of them. I mean you aren't scared of the Lost Souls from Doom 64 right? =)

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Kapanyo said:

Whenever I fought a Pain Elemental. Doom 64 made me realize exactly what that enemy is: it's an evil, demonic parasite that literally eats peoples' souls.
It then forces them to fight for it.
I was reminded of this from its grotesque appearance: a messed-up indescribable floaty thingy with two stretched mouths...

And that laugh. That horrible, horrible laugh.

Fuck, man, I've never thought about pain elementals that way. Now I hate them even more...

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Yeah, they really took a chance on the new Pain Elemental's design and it paid off quite well, IMO. I wish we could get some high resolution images of the 3D model used to render the sprites.

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Gothic Box said:

Fuck, man, I've never thought about pain elementals that way. Now I hate them even more...

Yeah, I think the Pain Elemental is similar, in respects, to Cerberus, from ancient Greek mythology: the multi-headed demon hound which eats peoples' souls if they don't make it into Heaven/Utopia/whatever. You can actually see the parallel in Doom II when the Pain Elemental opens its mouth and you see a Soul inside, and in Doom 64 with its multiple heads/faces.

Technician said:

Yeah, they really took a chance on the new Pain Elemental's design and it paid off quite well, IMO. I wish we could get some high resolution images of the 3D model used to render the sprites.

I agree! I think the D64 models were really well-made and if we had access to them, we might have some really stunning 3D model packs.

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I remember reading somewhere that they swapped around the sprites for the Pain Elemental and the Cacodemon.

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Avoozl said:

I remember reading somewhere that they swapped around the sprites for the Pain Elemental and the Cacodemon.

Well, in a way, that makes sense. The '64 Cacodemon has arms, brown skin and two black horns, like the Doom II Pain Elemental.

Meanwhile, the '64 PE is drastically different to both designs. However, it's less goofy, which leads me to believe it could have been intended for the more iconic monster (the Caco).

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The Pain Elemental is the only monster in that game who looked good. I did like how the fireballs the barons throw light up their body though.

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WilliamPlaysDooM said:

As an owner of the cartridge, i believe its much more scarier on the n64 than the tc and EX ports.


I still have my original cartridge from 1997 and every now and then I like to dust off the old N64 and play Doom 64. But it's great that there are ways to play it on the PC, especially Doom 64 EX.

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Piper Maru said:

I still have my original cartridge from 1997 and every now and then I like to dust off the old N64 and play Doom 64. But it's great that there are ways to play it on the PC, especially Doom 64 EX.


Yes, thats true.

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I don't know if I'd say it was entirely emotional, but Dark Citadel put me in that ambient mood of the game where I just clicked with it. Where I went from liking the game to thinking it's one of my all-time favorites. The layout, artwork, and music track came together to really convey the dark tone of the game.

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Turn the brightness back to the lowest setting in EX if you really want it to be as 'scary' as on the N64.

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The brightness is definitely one thing. The game was dark as fuck in the 90s on an old tube tv, especially for those of us who only had small tvs in our rooms. I wasn't allowed to hook video games up to the living room tv.

The other thing that makes it scarier on the console are the controls. Turning is rather slow, so you can hear something to your side or behind you and you can't spin around instantly like you can set your mouse sensitivity to do in the ports. You also can't switch directly to your desired weapon.

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I like to play Doom 64 with only the keyboard to make things a bit more difficult. Sorry to go off on a tangent, but I feel like sharing some thoughts about Doom 64.

Seeing this thread pop up, I've been reminiscing about Doom 64 a lot lately, despite the flak this title gets, I find something special about it. I can easily say these day it is my favorite of all the Doom games, and that's coming from someone who has been playing the original Doom since 1993. To me it stands out from the rest, it has a kind of charm that appeals to me.

1997 was the year we watched Leonardo Dicaprio drown in the North Atlantic Ocean while Celine Dion sang about how her heart will go on forever. Spawn also came out that year with Michael Jai White and John Leguizamo. Also I think the Spice Girls were pretty big at the time. But none of that interested me, instead, I was occupied with creeping through the dark corridors of an abandoned installation located on the red planet Mars. You see, many years ago the UAC opened the gates to hell and unleashed hordes of demons who slaughtered everyone in their path. The character I was controlling, the Doom Marine, stood against this ancient demon scourge, a one man army. However, the demons made their way to Earth and nearly had their way with it, the Marine was able to stop them once again. Time went on, and a orbital relay station picked up a strange energy signal unique to the demonic presence. Once again, Doom was upon us.

Something about Doom 64 calls to me, there is an obvious Quake influence, which ultimately leads back to H.P. Lovecraft, one of my favorite writers of all time. My favorites things have seemingly merged. I see the monsters in Doom as demons from beyond the stars, their origins abstract and unclear but their will, their commitment to decimating all who oppose them in the most horrible ways. The first portion of Doom 64 takes place in said abandoned space station. The corridors of the station sat quiet for immemorial years until the events of D64. Soon it becomes clear, the only way to close the portal that has opened to hell is to go through it and shut it from the other side. This is where the game really shines, the majority of the game takes place in the hell dimension. A place of pure chaos.

The moody lighting, the atmospheric score and sounds composed by Aubrey Hodges and the level design all coalesce into a unique experience, especially for a game on the Nintendo 64 where the bulk of the games were Mario and Zelda. I've posted in this thread before, and I have nothing but good things to say about Doom 64. As far the controls and lighting, the controls were something that I quickly got used to and was able to swiftly move about the maps. The lighting, while dark, really enforced the atmosphere. I played in a room with the curtains drawn, and worked out well for me. Hearing the hiss of an angry imp, or the grunt of an blood thirsty pinky put me on edge, perhaps they were going to leap out of the television and attack me for real! lol. Anyways, sorry for this lengthy post but I know there are other Doom 64/PSX fans out there and I think you understand where I'm coming from.

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I remember in Level 5 or 6 were I fell down from the platforms into a picth black hole filled with Spectres. They had not seen me yet but I could hear them. I felt powerless and weak being surrounded by Inferno-tersestial predators growling. I forced myself to return to the fray and start to Saw up some bastards with my dual-bladed Combat Chainsaw.

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Doom 64 was an excellent game, the biggest issue? It was released a few months later than it should. If they had released the game November or December 1996.

Also it's quite clear that they took some inspiration from Quake and put some elements from other Nintendo games of the time, puzzles and some other things.

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Wild Dog said:

Doom 64 was an excellent game, the biggest issue? It was released a few months later than it should. If they had released the game November or December 1996.

Also it's quite clear that they took some inspiration from Quake and put some elements from other Nintendo games of the time, puzzles and some other things.


I completely agree, it was really a matter of timing. For the first time, a true 3d FPS game came out, and that was all the rage. Doom 64 was quickly forgotten about unfortunately and as a result is the black sheep of the franchise. But it really is a great game, it's a different Doom more similar to the PSX versions of Doom, but with it's own spin on things. And considering it's on the N64, with it's limitations, it does truly stand out, and honestly, I think it's aged much better than early ugly 3D polygonal games. Regardless, Doom 64 has a place in my Dooming heart.

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It's so gorgeus that while D64 the same gameplay as PC version offers, I feel much more immersed on it, probably because of it's graphics, OST and atmosphere at all.

Most emotional part? There are many. I remember the moment when after playing PC versions for a while I stepped for first time to D64. Staging area... the darkness, colored lighting and this particular music made me really anxious and lonesome.

I like very much some first maps when for a moment you witnessed sectors shapping floors and platforms nicely.

Alpha Quadrant.. I'm sure there are many people who are scared of this map. Particularly this pitch black pit if you accidently fall into. I've felt so helpless, I knew it wasn't worth struggling with Spectres.

The music it played in Altar of Pain first. It's so disturbing that after hearing it for the first time it took me some time to play D64 again.

In the Void - this map makes you more lonesome. It gives a feeling there's really nothing beyond this fog. Just you on few platforms and bridges. I felt a relieve when I managed to evade Lost Souls and Elementals and escaped to next map. Even when the game still made me anxious.

Midway made a fantastic work by creating a unique experience among other Doom titles, while the gameplay is still the same. Too bad the sales were poor.

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Piper Maru said:

One of my favorite tracks, that disembodied muttering is really effective.


yes, it actually sounds like corrupted radio chat from marines in hell. The muttering caught me off guard.

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