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14 hours ago, geo said:

You just don't want it as much as you want something else such as freedom to do what you want.

Perhaps, or maybe the fear of being abandoned leads to my preemptive abandoning of others. Or maybe it is just the discrepancy between the thought of something and the reality; thoughts are always easier to deal with, heh. C'est la vie what a funny world we travel.

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I enjoy crafting things.

 

Models, miniature landscapes, repurposing things...I get a real kick out of making things.

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8 hours ago, Mr_Fox said:

i am a fox

I have heard the brace position is intended to break your neck, but that might be faux.

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Speaking of foxes (kinda), does anyone remember the Doom II Duel map, Foxtrot? It had a kickin' tune which I believe was composed specially for it, by the author's friend, I think.

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Today I experienced something completely new, the weather and my head together was so hot that my hair wax would not harden. Note to self: Buy strong gel or go for hair spray.

 

For starters, I look like a cross between Doom_RU and evennuis avatars. I lug around about 1 feet of very thick hair currently. Usually I would put hair wax on my scalp -  you will always get those loose hairs and mine are long enough to accidentally strangle a child with if a gust of air gets hold of them. Not today - today I had to walk around, sweating, with demonic tentacles coming from my head. It was a new experience.

Edited by NeedHealth

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On 8/3/2017 at 3:17 AM, axdoomer said:

I'm a kinesthetic learner.

does that mean you learn by doing? if so, then I also can only learn by doing when it is a mechanical, physical, or engineering task. I learn abstract concepts easily as long as they don't involve advanced math or calculus.

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3 minutes ago, Cupboard said:

does that mean you learn by doing? if so, then I also can only learn by doing when it is a mechanical, physical, or engineering task. I learn abstract concepts easily as long as they don't involve advanced math or calculus.

I learn things by watching....

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Just now, 42PercentHealth said:

I learn things by dreaming them up.

Interesting, now try to fly :D

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Random friday fact - can't tell difference between where, there and here. Also, when and then is confusing too. Maybe, someone could explain these words and how to use them?

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4 minutes ago, MysteriousHaruko said:

Random friday fact - can't tell difference between where, there and here. Also, when and then is confusing too. Maybe, someone could explain these words and how to use them?

Where can I use the money?
There is a bank nearby.

....
Here I will deposit my money.

 

When you will be available?
...
Ok. Then call me when you're available.

 

:D

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... don't ask me, I am not a native English speaker !!

 

My big doom design secret is that I actively try to avoid educating myself about colourtheory and instead go completely by feeling.  This post will probably be negative to my reputation here I realized. :p.

 

-This message will self destruct in 10 minutes.-

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8 minutes ago, NeedHealth said:

... don't ask me, I am not a native English speaker !!

 

My big doom design secret is that I actively try to avoid educating myself about colourtheory and instead go completely by feeling.  This post will probably be negative to my reputation here I realized. :p.

 

-This message will self destruct in 10 minutes.-

HAKAI!!! :D

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7 minutes ago, MysteriousHaruko said:

Random friday fact - can't tell difference between where, there and here. Also, when and then is confusing too. Maybe, someone could explain these words and how to use them?

"Where" and "when" are used to ask questions, as pointed out by @leodoom85. They can also be used as subordinating conjunctions for dependent clauses:

 

"I don't remember where I left my car keys."  "Kids usually start losing teeth when they are about 5 years old."

 

"There" and "then" literally mean "at that place" and "at that time" respectively, and imply some distance from the speaker.

 

"Here" literally means "at this place," and implies that it is where the speaker is.

 

These terms are relative, of course. If I left my keys on the table, and I was in the same room with you, you might say, "Your keys are there," because they are not within reach. If, however, I was talking to you on the phone, and you found my keys on the table, you would say, "Your keys are here," because you have access to them, while I do not.

 

Spoiler

In older english, there are even more confusing words: whither/hither/thither (meaning "to where, to here, to there"), whence/hence/thence ("from where, from here, from there"), and even some oddballs like wheretofore/heretofore/theretofore, wherefore/therefore (never heard of a herefore, but it's probably been used). Fortunately, you don't have to pay any attention to this last paragraph. ;-)

 

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3 minutes ago, 42PercentHealth said:

"Where" and "when" are used to ask questions, as pointed out by @leodoom85. They can also be used as subordinating conjunctions for dependent clauses:

 

"I don't remember where I left my car keys."  "Kids usually start losing teeth when they are about 5 years old."

 

"There" and "then" literally mean "at that place" and "at that time" respectively, and imply some distance from the speaker.

 

"Here" literally means "at this place," and implies that it is where the speaker is.

 

These terms are relative, of course. If I left my keys on the table, and I was in the same room with you, you might say, "Your keys are there," because they are not within reach. If, however, I was talking to you on the phone, and you found my keys on the table, you would say, "Your keys are here," because you have access to them, while I do not.

 

  Reveal hidden contents

In older english, there are even more confusing words: whither/hither/thither (meaning "to where, to here, to there"), whence/hence/thence ("from where, from here, from there"), and even some oddballs like wheretofore/heretofore/theretofore, wherefore/therefore (never heard of a herefore, but it's probably been used). Fortunately, you don't have to pay any attention to this last paragraph. ;-)

 

This explanation is clear as water. 

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26 minutes ago, MysteriousHaruko said:

Random friday fact - can't tell difference between where, there and here. Also, when and then is confusing too. Maybe, someone could explain these words and how to use them?

Where - Asks about the location of something

"Where is my shirt?"

 

 

There - Describes the location of something that is not in your immediate area

"Your shirt is there." (Referring to a location that is not in your immediate vicinity, such as another room)

 

 

Here - Describes the location of something that is in your immediate area

"Your shirt is here." (Referring to a location that is in your immediate vicinity, such as right next to you)

 

 

When - Asks about the time in which something is going to or has happened

"When can I have my shirt back?"

 

 

Then - Describing a point in time either before or after the present time

"Yesterday was a good day.  You had your shirt then." or "You need to say please, then you can have your shirt back."

 

EDIT:  Holy shit, this has become my favorite page in the entire thread.

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Just now, leodoom85 said:

This explanation is clear as water. 

You mean thine explanation.

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3 minutes ago, 42PercentHealth said:

"Where" and "when" are used to ask questions, as pointed out by @leodoom85. They can also be used as subordinating conjunctions for dependent clauses:

 

"I don't remember where I left my car keys."  "Kids usually start losing teeth when they are about 5 years old."

 

"There" and "then" literally mean "at that place" and "at that time" respectively, and imply some distance from the speaker.

 

"Here" literally means "at this place," and implies that it is where the speaker is.

 

These terms are relative, of course. If I left my keys on the table, and I was in the same room with you, you might say, "Your keys are there," because they are not within reach. If, however, I was talking to you on the phone, and you found my keys on the table, you would say, "Your keys are here," because you have access to them, while I do not.

 

  Hide contents

In older english, there are even more confusing words: whither/hither/thither (meaning "to where, to here, to there"), whence/hence/thence ("from where, from here, from there"), and even some oddballs like wheretofore/heretofore/theretofore, wherefore/therefore (never heard of a herefore, but it's probably been used). Fortunately, you don't have to pay any attention to this last paragraph. ;-)

 

English is so confusing sometimes, but still I'm using this. Thanks for help, now I can see differences between those words ;)

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6 minutes ago, MysteriousHaruko said:

English is so confusing sometimes...

I learned some Spanish in high school, and it really helped me realize what a crappy language English is. I don't envy people who try to learn it.

 

But I do envy multi-lingual people... I should just buckle down and start learning some languages again.

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It's not like you have a choise currently if you don't speak English as your mother tongue.

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2 minutes ago, 42PercentHealth said:

I learned some Spanish in high school, and it really helped me realize what a crappy language English is. I don't envy people who try to learn it.

 

But I do envy multi-lingual people... I should just buckle down and start learning some languages again.

I know English, Spanish (this is obvious because it's my native language), I learned a bit of French in school but I forgot and when I was in Italy for a job, I had to learn a bit of Italian...

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22 minutes ago, NeedHealth said:

My big doom design secret is that I actively try to avoid educating myself about colourtheory and instead go completely by feeling.

 

"by feeling" in these cases usually denotes a trial and error way of reaching a point you could've been guided to in much less time by the proper application (or intentional lack of application) of some theory. same thing could be said for most music composition or visual art forms. Basically, you lose nothing by learning new frameworks for designing things.

 

I'm not advocating that you need to do any of this to be a competent colorful doom mapper, but just commenting on the slight anti-intellectualism of such stances.

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Another fact of mine. I almost got bitten by a venomous and dangerous spider in the bathroom (an endemic spider) and since the antidote is no more produced in here...if that fucking spider got me that time...

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My religious life has been kinds all over the place.  I was raised a Catholic; briefly turned atheist in middle school; turned Buddhist for a while in college; toyed with being a Jehovah's Witness for a few months, which is a long story in itself; then eventually turned Pagan, finally felt "at home", and stuck with it ever since.

 

In retrospect, I sorta wish I had been a religious studies major in college.

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