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What is the extension of the RTZ file (the extension is invisible because of the "Hide extensions for known file types" option being enabled)?  It is possible that the file is only being labeled as a WinRAR archive because it coincidentally has the same extension as a file format that WinRAR uses.  I don't think that would affect the installation, however, unless the file actually is corrupted.

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2 hours ago, Averagewalrus23.9 said:

Yes, but it only lets me run the INSTALL.exe when the files had been copied from the floppy, but can only get past the 1st disk (out of 12) because the .exe thinks it's being run from the floppy drive, when it's not. (Tells me to remove disk 1, when I can't)

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DosBox saying my floppy drive "A" doen't exist, mounting it as C doesn't work (And wouldn't be a good idea anyways) and going to "A" via changing director doesn't work either.

 

The extension of the first RTZ was some obscure file compression format (When I ran the install.exe), while all the other RTZ's on the other disks extensions are numbered.

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http://www.dosbox.com/wiki/Basic_Setup_and_Installation_of_DosBox

 

http://www.dosbox.com/wiki/MOUNT#Mounting_a_floppy_drive

 

Edited by Master O

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25 minutes ago, Averagewalrus23.9 said:

That's exactly what I needed, it worked until disk 12 (It isn't formatted correctly I guess, or something must of gone wrong recently because I've "opened up" the data on that disk before.)

 

So does anyone know any programs that can "burn" floppy disk images to a floppy disk?

 

With respect to floppies, all you have to do is copy all files from the floppy itself onto another new floppy.  Floppies are usually not like CD-Roms, where you burn the .iso once and you're done.  However, that being said, you can create floppy disk images with this tool: 

 

http://www.chrysocome.net/rawwrite  (Use the "read" function to create the floppy image file and then "write" it on a new, different floppy disk).

 

Another thing you could try is copy all the files into a folder on your desktop and mount that folder as a floppy itself:

 

mount a c:\path\to\folder -t floppy

 

and see if that works for you.

 

Windows XP, Vista, 7, etc also have the commandline tool "diskcopy:"

 

http://www.microsoft.com/resources/documentation/windows/xp/all/proddocs/en-us/diskcopy.mspx?mfr=true

 

Edited by Master O

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26 minutes ago, Averagewalrus23.9 said:

That's exactly what I needed, it worked until disk 12 (It isn't formatted correctly I guess, or something must of gone wrong recently because I've "opened up" the data on that disk before.)

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So does anyone know any programs that can "burn" floppy disk images to a floppy disk?

If you have actual 1.44MB *.dsk or *.img files (and a physical floppy drive), then I'd suggest RawWriteWin. However, if the images are corrupted to begin with and/or the game used some kind of copy protection (unlikely that it'd reside on the 12th disk of a 12 disk set, but you never know...), that won't do you any good.

 

I don't know what kind of 3.5" drive you have, but if it's a USB external one, those are pretty flimsy, and error-out on disks that a decent 3.5" drive from the 90s has no trouble with, so you might want to rule that factor out.

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52 minutes ago, Averagewalrus23.9 said:

Never mind all that, I believe I just solved my problem. Thank you.

 

Good to hear.  Also, I was gonna mention this before you said you found a solution: if you really want to recover the data from the floppy, there's always the linux tool "ddrescue,"  and then recover all the data that way onto another image.

Edited by Master O

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23 minutes ago, Averagewalrus23.9 said:

I'm pretty sure that disk is fucked. (I finally was able to format it, but couldn't write the image to it using rawwritewin) But I managed to get a disk image of 12 off an abandonware site, and put it on a blank disk my father had. Final question for this thread, do magnets make floppy disks completely unusable, of just erase all the data off of them. 

Depends on the formatting mode you're using, the OS and drive.

 

In general, toying with a magnet around a floppy will cause some of the data to be unreadable or corrupt. If you didn't affect the FAT area (filesystem still accessible) but you were unlucky enough for the data correction/crc (yes, even floppies have it) not to catch the error, then you will read corrupted data without a warning.

 

If you affect the FAT zone, the disk may appear totally unreadable, but will not be permanently damaged at a physical level. If you use a magnet that's too powerful and oversaturates the magnetic medium, destroying every index, marker etc. on all tracks, then other interesting things may start happening.

 

Windows' default formatting mode may refuse to format a disk that has been bulk erased in this way, as it still requires some tracking information to be readable in order to kickstart the formatting process. You can try an "unconditional" format with windows' format command by using the /u parameter, but that too might fail on some disks, giving you a "Invalid media or track 0 bad - disk unusable" error. Some marginal drives may also not be able to properly erase/write data to a disk that has erased with a powerful magnet, so you will need to use a proper bulk eraser/degausser to bring back the disks to a magnetically neutral state that the drives can work with. Starting from Windows XP, Windows also has a very bad habit of randomly corrupting floppies, also making them "unformattable".

 

In all of the above cases, a tool such as Format 144 may get such an "unusable" disk usable again, at least usable enough to reformat it with other tools. I recommend always re-formatting a disk "recovered" by Format 144 with the regular format command under Windows. If it's not re-formattable right away, or shows a variable number of bad sectors each time you format it, I'd not entrust any important data to that disk (the very least, you cannot use it to write whole disk images to it, for obvious reasons).

 

 

Edited by Maes

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