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Anidrex_1009

What do you think about ID Software early days?

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Just as the title says.

 

I would like to be able to give a more correct opinion in this case, since I was not born in the best years for gaming. All I can say is something little and based only on comments or documentaries I've seen about it.

 

I just say that it's a company that I really admire, the great thing about everything for me is that they started like any teenager who wants to innovate in something that they like and enjoy. They loved video games and metal-rock, took their computers, their ideas, met and began to create jewelry from the video game industry. Romero, Carmack (The two), Hall. They are the first names of video game developers that I memorize in my life, I have a great respect to them and I thank them for the great work they did, the difficulties and challenges they deal with and the wonders they created together.

 

I'm not that old so I really do not have much experience with anything that has to do with videojueogs or very important moments for Doom (Maybe I was in diapers when epic things happened). But in truth, I have enough appreciation for this game and the company itself, a lot of respect for the founders who struggled and entertained with the soul when creating this game, is something that I love, when they create something because they like, when they create something because they are really passionate about it.

 

So, tell me, what do you think about ID?


Actually I do not think I have even enough historical concept to be able to give a bigger or detailed opinion, but I would like to know more about these subjects and their history and that is why I created this Post. Share your opinions and thank you very much!

 

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I like that Doom, while being an amazingly well-designed set of mechanics, feels like the product of its developers. You know exactly what these guys were into at the time --metal and fantasy and programming -- and the joy they have/had for making the game is infectious.

 

That's something that's missing from a lot of games, and while it isn't essential to admire the final product or have fun, it's always nice.

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What do I think? I've read Masters of Doom a dozen times. The famous Lake House picture is the most inspiring thing for me. But their story could only happen in america.

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Many things to say about it. I wanted to develop games long time, but never finished anything. Then I have read Masters of Doom and since that I copied their good traits into myself and now I have already 2 finished games out, working on 3rd :). That book is like a cocaine if you are a programmer.

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I played the heck out of the Commander Keen series when I was young, so I could definitely be called an id fan from even before I was allowed to get my hands on their more violent stuff (although if you asked me back then, I would have said Apogee fan).  The stuff they were pressed into making for Softdisk tended to be more hit or miss as you might expect but IMO Shadow Knights and Dangerous Dave in the Haunted Mansion are both fairly decent titles as well, and I recall Rescue Rover being so too if you like puzzle stuff.  Wolf 3-D was a game I was late to the party on so I'll probably never appreciate it as much as people who played it when it first came out as the hot new revolutionary thing, but I enjoy it from time to time.

 

It's also interesting to take a look at the solo games by John Romero and John Carmack from before the initial id team got together, but as games outside of the historical context they're not really anything to write home about for the most part.

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I think it's wonderful that they took their massive egos and funneled them into interactive art. I say this with the utmost reverence because the ego can result in total disaster; you might make shit art, or you get so ambitious that nothing ever reaches completion. Instead, they used this force to craft some of the most memorable games of the 90s. I mean, they proclaimed Doom was going to be the greatest game of all time and they kind of achieved that goal. The fact that Doom '16 is so damn entertaining, and yet feels true to the franchise's humble beginnings, is evidence that they found a balance between their desire to be kings among men, and maintaining the level-headed mentality required to create a good product. The fact that the original Doom 4 was scrapped because it wasn't what the series needed shows their dedication to quality.

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id was the go-to guys when it came to PC gaming back in the 90's. That was also true when they worked with Apogee during the Commander Keen/Wolf3D days.

 

I miss those days...

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6 hours ago, Cipher said:

You know exactly what these guys were into at the time --metal and fantasy and programming

And horror, hence the super shotgun (Evil Dead series), the chainsaw (Evil Dead series again), Alien-like themes etc.

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7 hours ago, Cipher said:

I like that Doom, while being an amazingly well-designed set of mechanics, feels like the product of its developers. You know exactly what these guys were into at the time --metal and fantasy and programming -- and the joy they have/had for making the game is infectious.

 

That's something that's missing from a lot of games, and while it isn't essential to admire the final product or have fun, it's always nice.

Thats right what I was thinking about them, their games are just like, their greatest ideas come true. 

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1 hour ago, GoatLord said:

I think it's wonderful that they took their massive egos and funneled them into interactive art. I say this with the utmost reverence because the ego can result in total disaster; you might make shit art, or you get so ambitious that nothing ever reaches completion. Instead, they used this force to craft some of the most memorable games of the 90s. I mean, they proclaimed Doom was going to be the greatest game of all time and they kind of achieved that goal. The fact that Doom '16 is so damn entertaining, and yet feels true to the franchise's humble beginnings, is evidence that they found a balance between their desire to be kings among men, and maintaining the level-headed mentality required to create a good product. The fact that the original Doom 4 was scrapped because it wasn't what the series needed shows their dedication to quality.

Lots of Devs could learn about them, lots, so many games that fall down because of greed. This is one of the reasons Doom is still up to this day.

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3 hours ago, NinjaLiquidator said:

Many things to say about it. I wanted to develop games long time, but never finished anything. Then I have read Masters of Doom and since that I copied their good traits into myself and now I have already 2 finished games out, working on 3rd :). That book is like a cocaine if you are a programmer.

Oh, like an: auto help book for gamers and programmers? 

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1 hour ago, HavoX said:

id was the go-to guys when it came to PC gaming back in the 90's. That was also true when they worked with Apogee during the Commander Keen/Wolf3D days.

 

I miss those days...

I also miss those days even if I wasn't even born.

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5 hours ago, gtsgreece said:

What do I think? I've read Masters of Doom a dozen times. The famous Lake House picture is the most inspiring thing for me. But their story could only happen in america.

Oh, I cant find that Lake House Picture, could you show me some more? That book sounds really cool.

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The only issue I have with id's philosophy is that they sort of shot themselves in the foot by pushing graphical tech to the forefront. It's why their games are so immersive and beautiful, but it's also why there have been increasingly larger gaps between releases.

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Well they piss me off with the fact that people follow them cause of context of awesomeness they have build around themselves, not their programming skills. If they remained guys from basement who just make their games, nobody would care. Maybe there is still a gap to get their success, but not in game development. You would have to do something innovative, cause they were at the time...

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13 minutes ago, GoatLord said:

The only issue I have with id's philosophy is that they sort of shot themselves in the foot by pushing graphical tech to the forefront. It's why their games are so immersive and beautiful, but it's also why there have been increasingly larger gaps between releases.

Yes, but in the end, they still did great after those long waits. I think the one who was constantly looking to evolve the graphics engine was John Carmack right? I've always thought that Carmack was like the ID brain, more technical and focused on the game system, Romero was probably the feelings and passions, focused on creating something innovative in the gameplay aspect. In the end, they both complimented themselves and created something great.

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Always thought it was cool based on things I read and was told about them. After reading Masters of Doom though, and watching the longer interviews, it honestly becomes really inspiring and almost fantastical, even with all the ups and downs post-Doom. I would honestly give anything to have been part of something like it, but sadly it really was something that couldn't have happened anywhere or "anywhen" else.

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7 hours ago, gtsgreece said:

What do I think? I've read Masters of Doom a dozen times. The famous Lake House picture is the most inspiring thing for me. But their story could only happen in america.

I still haven't read the bloody thing! I just ordered it on Amazon. 5 frickin stars with 301 reviews. Can't wait to finally read it. :D

 

Well said OP. I agree with you wholeheartedly. For me Doom is still one of the greatest games of all time and the roadmap for other companies to follow. 

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10 minutes ago, Red said:

Always thought it was cool based on things I read and was told about them. After reading Masters of Doom though, and watching the longer interviews, it honestly becomes really inspiring and almost fantastical, even with all the ups and downs post-Doom. I would honestly give anything to have been part of something like it, but sadly it really was something that couldn't have happened anywhere or "anywhen" else.

I think the most good thing about those early days, is that I bet they have lots and lots of fun doing what they love.

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Born too late to live off of making games in a college dorm with your bros.

 

Born too early to upload my consciousness into cyberspace.

 

Born just in time to live held hostage by an irreversibly irreparable economy. 

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I'm feeling very hopeful about the future of id. I think the long, difficult development cycle of Doom '16 was like a test for them. In the end it showed that they can triumph even in the most seemingly dire of circumstances.

Edited by GoatLord

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I have a lot of respect for the way they used the shareware model. Getting the entire first episode as a free demo shows a generosity of spirit and confidence in their game that is still pretty unique. And then they further expanded on this generosity by providing the community with the game's source code. It's something I've always admired about them. I fear that those days are behind them now that they are under Bethesda's roof and there is little of the id old guard remaining.

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For me it has been the thing with id software as they just seemed to be these guys with a new idea or concept. And they just followed through with it. With Doom, at least most of them, made what they wanted to do. As a bonus: during that time the company was small enough to keep communication short and to the point. In my eyes: if you had an idea and the rest of the team was ok with it, you could do it.

As I see it, this becomes harder as companies or development teams grow larger. Today such an environment can mostly be found in the indie game scene, but seldom with triple A games/studios.

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Early Id is the ultimate garage band success story. Four brilliant, slightly creepy young men determined to succeed in a world of expensive crappy dos computers. There 'll never be anything like them again.

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11 minutes ago, gtsgreece said:

Early Id is the ultimate garage band success story. Four brilliant, slightly creepy young men determined to succeed in a world of expensive crappy dos computers. There 'll never be anything like them again.

My heroes, put so much effort, so much passion so much joy in creating something that really wanted that they finished bordering the perfection, something incredible.

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What would you call 9 games developed and released in 12 months? Shovelware. Unless its iD, then you just call it 1991.

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20 hours ago, geo said:

What would you call 9 games developed and released in 12 months? Shovelware. Unless its iD, then you just call it 1991.

Damn good times.

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