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    DoomEd source code released


    printz
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    Hopefully some screenshots will show up soon. I'd like to see what it was like.

    EDIT: What's DOOM PRINT anyway?

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    Linguica said:

    ...where did these come from? You say Romero, but, like, where?

    edit: oh, he posted it on the forum of a place called... Doom... world? Is that a thing?


    :) He he!

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    Romero's been posting ton's of collectors pieces (books, shirts, game copies, early development stuff, etc) on his facebook page for the past few days via ebay bids.

    A lot of classic id stuff on there, and he is signing any of it at request.

    I asked him (jokingly) about having a NeXTstep slab machine that was used in DOOM's creation for sale anytime soon, as he had just prior posted some book documentation books that he used for NeXT for sale, and his response was "I'll be posting a NeXT slab development station up shortly."

    Oh, then he mentioned he was reaching out to y'all to release the DOOMED stuff.

    So yeah. I'd be keeping a close eye on his page for the next while...

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    Linguica said:

    ...where did these come from? You say Romero, but, like, where?

    edit: oh, he posted it on the forum of a place called... Doom... world? Is that a thing?


    Just think! If one had happened to mention Doomworld in the news-byte, there's some chance that it would be copied into news items on other sites, serving as a form of site promotion...

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    Wondering if romero grabbed those files off that neXT station he was polishing up for ebay that he mentioned after I inquired about it.

    If that's the case, and if that neXT station was part of DOOM's development, it'd make it likely the last existing hardware piece known that was involved with DOOM's creation

    The historic value and impact to pc fps gaming (and gaming as a whole) that machine would hold is.... priceless. That is literally the holy grail for the DOOM community, as it all started there on that drive/system, and everything it caused in gaming thereafter. It was where all the magic started.

    I think Doomworld as a community should reach out to Romero, or at the very least, to preserve that neXTstation in any effort we can, whether it be by request or by community effort on donation managed by doomworld's linguica (or some other high visibility doomworld admin) and apply that to the bid, and then turn around and donate it by the community for preservation, say, to a computer arts museum or institute. Smithsonian has some... and so do other museums. For example, this neXT station used by CERN and created by Tim Berners-Lee is on display for being the first web server:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CERN_httpd

    Hell, I'd put in the first $300 on that bid to get this thing preserved for the community. Wonder if anyone else here feels the same and would contribute.


    Really, such a machine should not be private collectors piece... it needs to be preserved by a community for its legacy, assuming the station he's gonna chuck on ebay is in fact part of Doom's development.

    I had a SGI indy machine that was used in Jurassic Park's original cgi design and modeling. I paid, I dunno, $1000 or so dollars for it at the time many years ago... and kept it in a basement with other collectibles. Unexpected flood came after unusually heavy rainfall and boom, all that stuff got destroyed when the basement wall took some damage. All that magic and history.... gone forever, all cus some dumb 19 year old (at the time) didn't take the right steps in preserving it from disaster or destruction. Don't want to see this happen... especially to the holy grail of Doom and fps gaming itself.

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    That's maybe a little hyperbolic, especially considering we HAVE many of the files from the games development including source code (well, the code of the Linux port, not the DOS original, but close enough).

    likely the last existing hardware piece known that was involved with DOOM's creation

    Not exactly - several of id's old NeXT machines (including the Cube, which I would consider "the" development machine, if any are) are in the hands of Don MacAskill, an old FPS dude (who went on to found the photo site SmugMug). He's said that he would like to auction them off for charity eventually, albeit wiped clean.

    An obvious candidate for a good recipient for that sort of item would be the Video Game History Museum, which is planning to build a permanent home in Frisco, TX, not far from Mesquite, which was id's was located at the time.

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    Linguica said:

    That's maybe a little hyperbolic, especially considering we HAVE many of the files from the games development including source code (well, the code of the Linux port, not the DOS original, but close enough).

    Not exactly - several of id's old NeXT machines (including the Cube, which I would consider "the" development machine, if any are) are in the hands of Don MacAskill, an old FPS dude (who went on to found the photo site SmugMug). He's said that he would like to auction them off for charity eventually, albeit wiped clean.

    An obvious candidate for a good permanent home for that sort of item would be the Video Game History Museum, which is planning to build a permanent home in Frisco, TX, not far from Mesquite, which was id's longtime home.


    Alright. Thanks for the clarification.

    But no. not exaggerating. That stuff should all be preserved. And that hardware is very rare... so that makes, less than, eh, 10 (and that's a guess) from DOOM's dev out in the wild? source code is all over the place... but that hardware... not so much.

    That museum seems it'd definitely be a good fit for it.

    Despite the other slabs and the cube still being out there, any piece of that development process (whether lone survivor or not) prolly needs to be passed on to that museum. If there's a community effort to make that happen or to get the financial backing to do so, I'd partake in it, just sayin'.

    The dude who has the rest of the hardware, be a shame if he had to wipe that (if that hadn't already been done or assuming nothings been modified over the years).

    I guess the importance here is getting them intact with their data still on it into proper hands... I'm assuming Carmack told this dude to wipe them over a decade ago or two ago if he ever planned to sell them off from what I'm reading... sure that wouldn't still be relevant today (unless that data was copyrighted to Bethesda) and for archiving/preservation for histortic purposes.

    If the slab Romero has still has that original data, then.. that only for the better if these other machines do not. Of course, that really does make me wonder if the data has to be destroyed for copyright/patent reasons?

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