Jump to content
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

LordHavoc

Members
  • Content count

    8
  • Joined

  • Last visited

About LordHavoc

  • Rank
    New Member
  1. LordHavoc

    Random Whining About Dark Places

    DarkPlaces does not add black borders. Whatever behavior you are seeing is a bug I'd like to investigate if you can describe it in more detail. In particular I need to know: Which OS? Windows? Linux? OSX? Which darkplaces client? darkplaces.exe or darkplaces-sdl.exe or their respective variants for other operating systems? Which darkplaces renderer? GL 2.0? D3D9? GL 1.3? GL 1.1? SOFT? What graphics chip is being used? The darkplaces renderers are selected by the vid_gl20, vid_gl13, vid_dx9, vid_soft cvars, the dx9 one is not available in darkplaces-sdl.exe. If using the vid_soft renderer, you may wish to tune the vid_soft_threads cvar (requires vid_restart) for better performance on a given number of cpu cores, it might not be making full utilization of the CPU by default, depending on number of cores. The SDL and non-SDL clients select resolutions differently so one or them may have black borders and the other have no black borders, the vid_dx9 1 renderer also chooses resolutions differently. I recommend playing at 1366x768 rather than 1280x720 regardless of all else, but you can improve framerate of 1366x768 using r_viewfbo 1;r_viewscale 0.5 or similar settings to reduce resolution of the rendering.
  2. LordHavoc

    Random Whining About Dark Places

    Put this in your id1/autoexec.cfg and darkplaces should have the magic sauce you're looking for: gl_texturemode GL_NEAREST_MIPMAP_NEAREST gl_picmip 0 cl_particles_quake 1 vid_width 1366 vid_height 768 vid_conwidth 640 vid_conheight 360 This should use pixelated textures, and the old particles (although they don't animate quite the same due to particle engine changes), and attempts to use your 1366x768 resolution if Windows will allow it (if Windows won't allow it you might want to install an EDID hack to add it to the supported resolutions), note that if you cycle through the video modes in the DP menu it will let you choose all the resolutions that Windows thinks your monitor can handle, if 1366x768 does not appear then that's more of an OS problem and not darkplaces itself. This should look considerably more authentic than glquake, too. The black border problem is either your monitor padding out 1280x720 with black borders or it is your video driver, you may be able to fix this in the control panel for your video driver. Also you can make stock engines (such as dos quake) use mouse look permanently with: +mlook
  3. LordHavoc

    Rage in Edge Magazine

    I do find this "binary" comparison you make quite compelling, and while this is sometimes the intended behavior (instagib being a very popular Unreal Tournament mutator for example), I agree that the "assessing inventory" and attrition mechanics of singleplayer have been lost. It's worth noting that AD&D is entirely focused on depleting resources - the dungeon master (story teller / rule keeper) throws monsters at players to deplete their resources, making the game more interesting - the goal is not necessarily to defeat the players but to make them think carefully about their actions as the story progresses. One game that did a good job of depletion of inventory (and met some criticism for it) is Hexen 2, where health vials are carried and you choose carefully when to drink them to avoid wasting any, this in addition to the limited ammunition (blue and green mana) that you may opt not to use in a particular situation to conserve it for a more important use, gave the game a very strict inventory depletion mechanic.
  4. LordHavoc

    Rage in Edge Magazine

    Sounds like Unreal 2... Mass Effect is remarkably linear too, at times.
  5. LordHavoc

    Rage in Edge Magazine

    When I saw Rage at QuakeCon (with no cameras allowed, too bad), it looked pretty fun, especially the freedom to race as much or as little as you like, the Monster Bash game show, and other elements that made it cross genres so many times it was quite unique. It's definitely a sandbox FPS RPG but still fairly directed (akin to STALKER). I could not shake the feeling that it resembles Fallout3 though, which isn't a bad thing because it definitely improved upon all the weak spots in Fallout3 (especially the combat). I got the impression it has several minigames (also unusual for id Software). I have a fondness for singleplayer, but I'm really curious what is going to happen with the multiplayer, because the environment seems to have a lot of potential for something unique (beyond basic deathmatch or racing) if the designers are sufficiently inspired.
  6. LordHavoc

    Rage in Edge Magazine

    I was told by a Prey developer that they asked 3DRealms up front whether they wanted large levels with medium detail, or tight levels with high detail, 3DRealms told them to go with tight levels with high detail. I think this gets to the heart of the open/tight debate, a matter of requiring high detail or else a game is accused of not looking "nextgen". I'm continually saddened by the state of art tools - in particular level editors - they simply are not up to the task of making high detail levels quickly, if a level takes more than a week to make and requires multiple artists (mostly "environment artists" who make static mesh models), you aren't going to see many creative levels in a game. Give a level designer an oldschool tile map editor and they whip up dozens of levels in a month Give a level designer UnrealEd3 or DoomEdit and modern "nextgen-ness" requirements and they might get one level done in a month, usually needing assistance with static meshes to even meet that target. But we're getting off the topic of regenerating health...
  7. LordHavoc

    Rage in Edge Magazine

    I am always frustrated by linear story-driven games and have been calling them a plague on the industry for as long as I can remember, I want to approach problems my own way, even a game with multiple sandbox levels is more interesting to me than one without any sandbox elements. Example: FarCry let you wander around a lot in the early levels, it was still boxed in and you soon found the limits, but it was not "on rails" in the same sense as most games, you were free to sneak past outposts, wipe them out with guns blazing, snipe them from a distance and shoot down a helicopter that came in retaliation... I'm also rather fond of STALKER which is in a similar vein (as far as being a series of sandbox levels, with the ability to return to earlier areas - and indeed, often a need to do so). I'm not mentioning Fallout3 here because that's more RPG than FPS. I'm saddened by the lack of research into sandbox games these days, there was a time when many games simply defined the rules, provided a rudimentary backstory, and then set you off on your own to figure out how exactly you were supposed to win - now these games are called "strategy games" and "sandbox games" depending on genre (examples of modern attempts at this kind of you're-on-your-own gameplay include FarCry2 and Prototype).
  8. LordHavoc

    Rage in Edge Magazine

    My own opinion of regenerating health is generally a positive one. For new players, there are few things more annoying than saving the game and getting killed repeatedly because you did not know what to anticipate in the game (isn't that part of the fun?) and saved with 15 health before a boss battle. For this reason I implemented regenerating health in the DarkPlaces Mod many years ago, it compensated for the nearly instagib-like monster damage, if you weren't dead, you would use up 3 rooms worth of health packs to get back to norm, and then be out of them if you get hurt again, it was a balance change but a necessary one. Furthermore, health packs scattered around a level are illogical at best, and oppressive / frustrating at worst. A somewhat opposing approach was demonstrated in Duke Nukem Manhattan Project where instead of Health you have Ego, which increases (over 100) with each kill, and goes down over time, so if you have a good kill streak you are unusually tough and can carry on playing fast and loose, which gives the game a different kind of momentum to its play style. A parallel exists in ammo replenishment in levels - if the level designer does not anticipate the needs of the player (a nearly impossible task), it can be frustrating, and many ammo packs go untaken because the player is already at their limit for an ammo type they do not use much. My own preference has always been looting corpses for equipment, it's a more rewarding mechanic than "sit behind this pillar while you wait for a timer to expire so you can make another foolhardy attempt in the fire fight" which the majority of modern console games use.
×