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LordMeow

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About LordMeow

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  1. LordMeow

    Documenting the history of Doom community

    It's obvious that such a book would be a labor of love, not for profit.
  2. LordMeow

    Documenting the history of Doom community

    It should be written in a friendly way, along the lines of 'Masters of Doom'. A great deal of raw data is there, in the wiki as have been pointed out, it's just that the sequence of events and the way they are presented would have to form a cohesive narrative.
  3. LordMeow

    Documenting the history of Doom community

    Problem is, as the community endures it becomes much more difficult to trace its origins. There have been many important milestones, but not everybody would agree on them. Maybe a detailed timeline, a sort of table of contents for an hypothetical book, will start things rolling. Or focusing on some aspect, such as editing and editors, source ports, map making (this topic will even be more divided, before and after the source release, etc.), demo making and even demo editing, source code analysis, history of Doom development... There are SO many topics... Doom was a pioneer in many senses.
  4. LordMeow

    Documenting the history of Doom community

    Maybe the problem lies in the difficulty of getting it straight, in an orderly manner. Biggest problem is narrowing the subject, I would like to have something about the first steps of the community.
  5. I have been recently reading a lot about videogame history and this took me to the Doom wiki, particularly about source ports, and that got me to the 10-years of Doom special about the genealogy of source ports... It dawned on me that a book or a set or articles, or anything about the history of the Doom community is in order... In my mind at least, this is the first community formed around a game, that has survived for almost 25 years, evolving the game after its release thorugh source ports. How where the first days? How it was to see released DEU? And when DEU 5 could finally build nodes? How about the time when the source code was released? The first wad? The history of the Doom community is so full of landmarks, it has helped shape other communities, this was the first time a game could be modded on such scale, it was this game which got me into game programming, which allowed me to see its innards... Maybe I am rambling, but I really think this should be documented, but it is a task that I hardly could do alone... To sum it up.. does any of you think the same?
  6. LordMeow

    Eternity Tweaking [Catnip Engine]

    Even with all his tampering, such a book would have been a great read. And yes, John Carmack should have release the DOS code with all the sound stuff stripped, and the code in an uncompilable state. In a day or so, everything will have been taken care of.
  7. LordMeow

    Eternity Tweaking [Catnip Engine]

    Kreimeier should have written that book on Doom source code... Maybe we should coordinate to write it. Very few people would read it, but the ones who did will find a fascinating reading.
  8. LordMeow

    PRBOOM Graphical Glitches

    Quasar once told me that not everything in Cardboard had made its transition to Eternity... though I may be wrong.
  9. LordMeow

    PRBOOM Graphical Glitches

    According to the Eternity wiki, 'It was originally developed outside of the Eternity Engine as a stand-alone program which could draw Doom textures and flats in 32-bit color with dynamically calculated light fading.' I don't know if a standalone renderer was ever produced, but if it was, preserving it on Github or something will be very interesting.
  10. LordMeow

    PRBOOM Graphical Glitches

    Threads like this always make me think about the Cardboard renderer... Quasar, are you sure that SoM does not have the original? Where is SoM anyway, has he left the community?
  11. LordMeow

    PSX Doom performance

    Thanks for the detailed explanation, Quasar, it really clarifies many things. I can't imagine how they squeezed Quake 2 in there, though... it looks pretty good, though it's been quite some time since I last saw it in action on PSX:
  12. LordMeow

    PSX Doom performance

    I have been reading the Jaguar Doom sources and tinkering a little with the Doom ports of the era, and a question has arised... If I am not mistaken, PSX Doom is more or less a port of Jaguar Doom, and inherits the cuts made to the maps in order to be renderable at reasonable speeds... but the question is... what limitations were in the PSX so that the cutted maps were needed? Would they have made without being as cutted as the Jaguar one, and therefore, the devs used the Jag ones to cut time? PSX is a pretty reasonable 3D system for its era, I don't really understand why the maps had to have so much cuts, and I am sure that it has nothing to do with colored lighting or other enhancements, since the hardware would help on that side... Any hints on this? Does anybody tech-savvy enough have an answer for this?
  13. This gave me a clue: And that's why I am asking. But I'm afraid only Quasar can give us the answer on this one. Besides, there is no problem in programming a standalone renderer for a given map format. I have done that myself with Quake maps, just for fun, and I am sure that I have not done the same renderer as John Carmack did (because I have also studied it and because I went straight to Direct3D, to learn DirectX 9).
  14. Anybody knows if there is a standalone implementation of the Cardboard renderer?
  15. Do you mean that Cardboard existed as a separate renderer independent of Eternity?. I had no idea about that, is there any full implementation? Or at least just the renderer? Al ways thought that Cardboard was started and then merged into Eternity as its renderer.
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