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C30N9

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  1. This thread is about my future career job discussion. Game programmers/designers are recommended to reply here. I'm 15 now, I know I'm young, but I should start thinking about my job. Now here is the small issue, which job is perfect to me. I would choose strongly designing or programming, mainly for gaming.

    Why did I choose (mostly) Game programming?

    - Creativity: One of my favorite things. By this I mean creating your own thing and showing it to others. It is just awesome to me, guess why I like Doom mapping? :P

    - Your own work: Sometimes, programmers go to work for companies, but others can program their own things alone at home, or with another group. You wouldn't get pressure on your self, plus you're the one who will decide your time. Minus laziness and not-hardworking of course!

    - Huge amount of money: You make your game and then sell it worldwide, there is a huge number of people who will buy your game, and there will be people who will like the game. Even if you sold it for $1, lets say 10000 were impressed and bought the game, you'll get $10000.

    A big example is "Minecraft", it is created by Notch. Even though it is a simple game, it is so popular. I believe it is sold for $15, and about 4 million people have bought the game. Well, 15 * 4 * 10 ^ 6 = $60000000. Huge isn't it? :P But this case will happen if the game was too enjoyable and popular.

    Also, once I heard a story about a man who studied java scripting, and was able to create one simple game. He did and sold it for $1 only, and the results came above $1 million.

    - Creating what wasn't in your favorite game: FPS games about killing monsters are my favorite. I like Doom, and love the maps in it and gameplay. I also like Serious Sam, and love the music and proceeding through chapters. But you were frustrated because you didn't find things you wished for.

    Lets say you want to make a game, inspired by those 2 games. Fusing Doom and Serious Sam together and make a game you dreamed of with new abilities you always wanted to be.

    What are my fears?

    Not much, but I may find it difficult, but I guess I won't because I kinda like coding and do understand it, and second, I will be studying to become one. :P

    Another thing is, (Ok this may sound crazy) I may need a side job, because what if I was making something, but didn't succeed at the end? Or perhaps taking a long time, and that small side job will give me money during programming.

    Lastly, strongly requested from game programmers here, what are the suggestions you can give me? And how was your career at this type.

    I hope I cleared my opinion here, and would love to receive from you.
    Thanks.

    1. Show previous comments  13 more
    2. C30N9

      C30N9

      GooberMan said:

      Just little bit more. I can assure you that DarkBASIC is more limited than C++ because it aims to be beginner friendly. I can write C++ code that, when used as you'd use DarkBASIC, will look exactly as complicated and take up the same number of lines of code. And I'd effectively be misusing C++ if I did that.


      Indeed. But I was surprised after watching some videos of 3D games developed showing what DarkBASIC can do, mostly noted, the FPS engine. I should stick to it and then go for harder.

    3. GooberMan

      GooberMan

      Straight up, once you've gotten used to programming paradigms I'd recommend doing a 2D game first. But using 3D math and resources. Only having to worry about X and Y is perfect for beginners. Once you get in to the Z axis, you have to stop worrying about such handy things as edge-of-screen collision and start working with planes and poly soups and convex hulls and all sorts.

      Get used to the concepts, then step it up. Unless you're a mathematical prodigy, you're not going to understand it all first time.

    4. DuckReconMajor

      DuckReconMajor

      I'm graduating after next semester with a Bachelor's in Computer Science. For a little while I was set on becoming a game programmer. I knew the things GooberMan said and was like bring it on. I've calmed down since then and I'm just happy getting my degree. I've even dropped my Modeling and Simulation minor since I've heard from so many people how the last class I need to take is complete bullshit and doesn't teach you anything, and have decided to take an IT class in C++ GUIs instead to finish my upper division gen-eds.

      I took the other class I needed for the MSIM minor last semester, which was Intro to Game Development. It was a lot of work (I spent a month on the final project and still didn't finish) but it was a hell of a lot of fun. I don't know that it's something I'd want to do for a job though.

      Right now it's at the point where if the unlikely situation arose where a game developer offered me a job I'd take it, but I'm no longer going to kill myself trying to break into an industry that will just shit on me as I do cool things that get ignored as GooberMan said.

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