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Grazza

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  1. Here is a small selection of photos from my recent trip to Arctic Canada and Greenland based around the theme of "light". Of course, light plays a rather central role in any photography, but here it is truly the star of the show.

    While perhaps not the most visually striking effect seen in these photos, the <b>Fata Morgana</b> is certainly the most weird. It is a form of mirage, but unlike the form with which most of us are most familiar (i.e. a heat haze), this appears when there is a temperature inversion, and causes images to appear above the horizon. These images are of objects that may lie well beyond the horizon in reality. Often there are multiple images, some of them inverted, with the overall effect looking like very high and impossible structures in the distance. Some early explorers were so fooled by the Fata Morgana that they turned back from their voyage, believing there was no way through, and at least one whole expedition was sent out to map a nonexistent landmass that had been reported by earlier explorers. I understand how they made those mistakes - I myself failed to take pictures of some of the most striking instances of the Fata Morgana on this trip precisely because I thought it really was land! For more on this phenomenon, I'll refer you to <a href=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fata_morgana_(mirage)>wikipedia</a>.

    All the Fata Morgana pictures in this set were taken with 18x zoom.

    Trip dates (London-London): 17th July - 6th August 2008. The first two pictures are from Ottawa, the jumping-off point for the trip north, and where I spent a few days sightseeing and meeting up with friends/travelling companions.

    <a href=http://img154.imageshack.us/my.php?image=p1040258dd5.jpg><img src=http://img154.imageshack.us/img154/241/p1040258dd5.th.jpg></a>
    Office buildings in Ottawa, featuring a reflection of a reflection of a reflection

    <a href=http://img293.imageshack.us/my.php?image=p1040280fi9.jpg><img src=http://img293.imageshack.us/img293/8605/p1040280fi9.th.jpg></a>
    Light show, parliament building, Ottawa

    <a href=http://img178.imageshack.us/my.php?image=p1040654ei1.jpg><img src=http://img178.imageshack.us/img178/429/p1040654ei1.th.jpg></a>
    Sunrise, Frobisher Bay, Baffin Island

    <a href=http://img246.imageshack.us/my.php?image=p1040687nb9.jpg><img src=http://img246.imageshack.us/img246/1311/p1040687nb9.th.jpg></a>
    Fata Morgana (and sea ice), Davis Strait; in this case, we can see several images fairly clearly

    <a href=http://img353.imageshack.us/my.php?image=p1040688he0.jpg><img src=http://img353.imageshack.us/img353/7507/p1040688he0.th.jpg></a>
    Fata Morgana (and sea ice), Davis Strait; here the multiple images are more closely sewn together, giving more an impression of solid land

    <a href=http://img292.imageshack.us/my.php?image=p1040933uy8.jpg><img src=http://img292.imageshack.us/img292/4038/p1040933uy8.th.jpg></a>
    Fogbow, Baffin Bay

    <a href=http://img179.imageshack.us/my.php?image=p1050450wy2.jpg><img src=http://img179.imageshack.us/img179/43/p1050450wy2.th.jpg></a>
    Fata Morgana (and icebergs), West Greenland

    <a href=http://img516.imageshack.us/my.php?image=p1050742rd4.jpg><img src=http://img516.imageshack.us/img516/8845/p1050742rd4.th.jpg></a>
    Icebergs in late evening light, West Greenland

    <a href=http://img149.imageshack.us/my.php?image=p1050837ny7.jpg><img src=http://img149.imageshack.us/img149/7900/p1050837ny7.th.jpg></a>
    Early morning sun projects a beam through a hole in an iceberg, West Greenland

    <a href=http://img150.imageshack.us/my.php?image=p1060118ci2.jpg><img src=http://img150.imageshack.us/img150/3574/p1060118ci2.th.jpg></a>
    View of the horizon during total solar eclipse, near Prince Leopold Island

    <a href=http://img175.imageshack.us/my.php?image=p1060121aw3.jpg><img src=http://img175.imageshack.us/img175/8311/p1060121aw3.th.jpg></a>
    The scene on deck during the total solar eclipse, near Prince Leopold Island

    <a href=http://img517.imageshack.us/my.php?image=p1060304da7.jpg><img src=http://img517.imageshack.us/img517/7067/p1060304da7.th.jpg></a>
    Fata Morgana, now having its effect on a distant headland, Admiralty Inlet

    <a href=http://img149.imageshack.us/my.php?image=p1060427co0.jpg><img src=http://img149.imageshack.us/img149/1952/p1060427co0.th.jpg></a>
    Fata Morgana, this time distorting the view of distant low cloud, Admiralty Inlet

    <a href=http://img170.imageshack.us/my.php?image=p1060444qr4.jpg><img src=http://img170.imageshack.us/img170/2549/p1060444qr4.th.jpg></a>
    The ship's name reflected in the smooth waters in Arctic Bay

    <a href=http://img237.imageshack.us/my.php?image=p1060631td9.jpg><img src=http://img237.imageshack.us/img237/8347/p1060631td9.th.jpg></a>
    A very pink midnight sun, with its disk clearly visible, viewed from Nanisivik "Airport".

    1. Show previous comments  5 more
    2. Grazza

      Grazza

      TheCupboard said:

      The 3rd one with the sunset is really unique. :-) Incredible pictures.

      Thanks. Actually I labelled it a little carelessly (now fixed) - it was in fact sunrise (3:54 am). The sunset a few hours earlier had looked pretty similar though.

    3. Kyka

      Kyka

      Wow.

      Magnificent.

      If even the pictures look that good, it must have been amazing to see that stuff withh your own eyes.

    4. Grazza

      Grazza

      Kyka said:

      If even the pictures look that good, it must have been amazing to see that stuff withh your own eyes.

      Sometimes things look better through the camera than they do to the eye, and at other times it fails to capture the experience at all. I find sunsets tend to look deeper and moodier in their early stages through the camera, but the later stages can be disappointing compared to what the eye sees.

      BTW, none of the pictures were taken with a polarizing filter, or have been adjusted on a computer.

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