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Springy

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About Springy

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  1. So, earlier this year I left college and have had about 8 months of unemployment and finally a company called me on Friday. Is this good? In a way yes but the job I applied for was only because I was desperate. The interview is tomorrow in Hitchin (heh), for a call centre. Don't get me wrong, I can take insults seeing as they're just words but out of all the companies I applied for, it just had to be the last resort one.

    It wouldn't hurt to have got some form of contact from the other jobs to see if they got my application or what, I mean, what's the deal here? Companies are too tight to part with paper or sending an email is what the deal is. If I get it, then good, if not, then oh well at least I get to improve my interview skills just like my old apprenticeship placement I applied for a good 2 or 3 years back, (I respect this company for actually getting back to me and it has given me some form of hope). Well, at least I get to don a suit for the first time in ten years (suit for a call centre?). So I suppose there are some upsides.

    Edit: Sorry if there's any typos, on my phone.

    1. Show previous comments  10 more
    2. fraggle

      fraggle

      Maes said:

      In other words, the interview process doesn't give any progress feedback until you're definitively hired or rejected

      Well, the point there is that you don't want to prejudice the interview: if you know the "answers" then you can guide the candidate to them, perhaps without even meaning to. It's actually very easy to do this: ie. lead the candidate along a path without them realising you're doing it. If I'm interviewing someone who is really stuck I sometimes intentionally do this so that we can make some progress with the question.

      By the way, referencing my previous post, this whole "test call" thing seems like a great example of a dumb hiring process. What's that all about? If they want to test how you speak on the phone, they can just conduct a phone interview. If they want to take you by surprise, then why tell you that they're going to call you? Seems like another gimmick to keep you on your toes waiting on their call, maybe some kind of silly psychological game. It's disrespectful and certainly does nothing to judge your suitability for the job.

    3. Maes

      Maes

      fraggle said:

      By the way, referencing my previous post, this whole "test call" thing seems like a great example of a dumb hiring process. What's that all about?


      Probably to see if you could be alert and available "on call" at any moment, like you'd -probably- be expected from the job, and be able to handle the call professionally, without breaking up etc. Moreso since you had actually been alerted that it would happen, and since in theory you're a determined job hunter who wants to work for them (amirite?) you'll probably have nothing better to do than wait for their call. No?

      I think I can actually understand the logic here: if you manage to miss TWO calls for which you were also given ample warning about, then maybe you are not really serious about the job (BTW, missing calls when job hunting, even if they are not part of an explicit "field test" like in this case, is a big faux-pas). Or somesuch.

    4. Springy

      Springy

      Maes said:

      Probably to see if you could be alert and available "on call" at any moment, like you'd -probably- be expected from the job, and be able to handle the call professionally, without breaking up etc. Moreso since you had actually been alerted that it would happen, and since in theory you're a determined job hunter who wants to work for them (amirite?) you'll probably have nothing better to do than wait for their call. No?

      I think I can actually understand the logic here: if you manage to miss TWO calls for which you were also given ample warning about, then maybe you are not really serious about the job (BTW, missing calls when job hunting, even if they are not part of an explicit "field test" like in this case, is a big faux-pas). Or somesuch.

      I agree on that first part. The two calls however was the lady phoning me in regards to the application in the first place and the second one being the reminder of the interview, which was due the next day. The "test call" was the third which I missed today (how I somehow missed it I don't know) I knew it was due, my phone was on loud and vibrate even when I went to the job centre I was checking my phone regularly. To be honest though it's not a job I really see myself wanting to do all of my life all I want is any old job at the moment (so I am actually doing something) realistically, I want a high paid IT job but I lack any work experience whatsoever (I only have education).

      If I'm interviewing someone who is really stuck I sometimes intentionally do this so that we can make some progress with the question.


      That seems like a good idea, do you have to take a lot of people for interviews?

      By the way, referencing my previous post, this whole "test call" thing seems like a great example of a dumb hiring process. What's that all about? If they want to test how you speak on the phone, they can just conduct a phone interview. If they want to take you by surprise, then why tell you that they're going to call you?


      Yes, if it was to take people by surprise then you wouldn't tell them. The only thing I can think of is that this is used to see how you interact with others on the phone BUT the person who is doing this has already experienced how I sound on the phone. I don't act when I'm on the phone I just talk like I normally do.

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