7hm

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  1. Came for the meltdown, left with a cool analysis of level design. Thanks for linking this.
  2. Not quite another year since the last bump, but eh, this update is big enough to necro again. Up to 13,079 maps in 2126 wads, representing the work of 1465 authors. I'm finally starting to reach the point where most of the megawads have been catalogued, and what's left in that area is stuff of perhaps questionable value. However, there are still an absolute ton of single map releases to go, especially as you go back into the mid 90s. My "to sort" folder has ~1500 wads in it, and I'm sure there's other stuff of value out there - plus every time someone releases something, of course. Anyway if this interests anyone the updated link is here: http://s000.tinyupload.com/index.php?file_id=05030207161642675797
  3. Couple thoughts: Seems like this could be boom / or limit removing if you handled the sky differently. Map 1 has a very classic Doom feel but man you like to throw in the #s. I'm bad at Doom and found it rough going. Not complaining mind you, it's a different approach and I mostly enjoyed it here. Basically a classic map except when someone else might have used 5 monsters you used 15. Map 2 was probably the best - I thought you did a great job with the spectres. Map 3 has some missing textures, and is uh... hard to find a foothold. Kind of cool though. Map 4 is broken (can lock yourself into the room with the punchy demons / the hallways afterwards) but it also seems like it's unfinished (killed 100%, no exit?), so that might make sense. This was definitely the weirdest map. The music really fit the bill here. I assume you're going to fill up the rooms, but I honestly kind of liked the weird empty rooms. Reminds me of 90s maps in a good way. You had a couple real fuck you traps in terms of monster density, but that's probably ok. Less ok were the instances where you threw a whole bunch of meat into situations where there wasn't really any danger (a couple times, but the most obvious is the hell knight trap in Map 4). Anyway I enjoyed it.
    The first of the Odessa series, and one of the lighter Evans maps. Very little incidental combat, rather oriented towards small setpieces interspersed with obscure progression. It builds up to a fun final battle. A good intro to the Odessa series - you're going to want to get used to the idea of checking for offset textures and things that look wrong in the automap.
  4. BTSX. It's incredibly polished and a great demonstration of what Doom can really achieve and how pretty the game can be. Valiant would also be good for this I think. Probably on HNTR depending on how comfortable they are with FPSs.
  5. I think this was a really important point that might be missed. Playing ZDoom maps from 10 years ago is a real chore. Sometimes everything just works, but there's no guarantee of that. When I play a Boom map from the early 2000s I don't need to download a version of Boom that was in use at the time, I just use PRBoom+. It just works. A stable format is important. I don't really map, but from a player's perspective, I can tell you I'm more likely to load up an old Boom map than an old ZDoom map that I'm not sure will work as intended.
  6. Heya. Albertoni pointed me to this, and I just want to chime in with the few others who've said it... E3M1 is fantastic. I'll go back to the start and run through the rest of the maps now, but I really enjoyed that. Have an FDA of me solving the puzzles. The timed door one was very annoying because of my piss reflexes and uncertainty as to whether or not I was on the right track to solve it, but otherwise I didn't have too tough a time of them. I may or may not have brute forced the crushers :) unaligned_map19FDA.zip
  7. It's not on idgames, I grabbed it out of the "looking for a wad" thread ages ago. It's very 90s, and as far as I can tell doesn't really have any obvious antecedents or successors in terms of Doom maps, other than some weird offshoot 90s stuff. It's ugly but technically functional. http://www.mediafire.com/?8v819qqh785509x Definitely going to check out that Unaligned map now. Empty maps are awesome.
  8. 7 - Castle Heng 7 - Odessa 1 (I'd vote for the entire series, but I'll just pick my sentimental favorite, which is the first one) 7 - Cyberdreams 5 - Bauhaus 5 - Eternal Doom III 4 - Scythe 4 - Going Down 4 - Sunlust (even though I've never played it on harder than HNTR, it's just so pretty) 4 - BTSX Episode 1 4 - Vanguard 4 - Valiant
  9. Yeah, I was referring to Where's All the Data?, though also to some of the more in-depth Program B episodes as well. I think one of the issues with WAD?, which a series like this could help alleviate, is that there's only so much to be said about any given wad that isn't just descriptive. WAD? episodes were fairly short for a reason. If you're able to broaden the focus to a mapper's "wadography" there would probably be a lot more to say about how their style evolved, influences, etc. Off the top of my head... there's a lot of great analysis of the id levels, but Erik Alm is probably as, or more, influential to the style of maps that dominate the community today than somebody like Sandy, and there's not very much analysis of his work at all.
  10. In Castle Heng the entire set is basically gimmick maps, but the most common motif is teleporting Cyberdemons. The most common use is getting you to chase a Cyberdemon down a hallway or through a series of rooms, with the cyber constantly teleporting just out of reach or into a position where he can blast away at you. In map 28 or 29 it's used to good effect when you have you jump off a ledge onto an unlit damage sector that funnels you off another ledge, where you land surrounded by Revenants and Imps in a little square area with that teleporting Cyber from earlier on another ledge taking potshots at the lot of you. There was also a really cool level where you face maybe 20 cybers but they're all teleporting around the map randomly, so you have to run around like a maniac popping switches and dodging rockets. I'm also a sucker for maps without enemies or with very few enemies. To go back to Heng - early on there's a map that has no monsters, just some puzzles. I love that. Expanding on the idea, I'd love it even more if there were a handful of monster (viles or cybers) that were within audio distance but deliberately unreachable and just there to leave you anticipating the fight. Then in a later map you pull the same trick but you have them actually pop out and ambush the player at an opportune moment.
  11. Haven't watched the whole thing, but from what I've seen, this is great. I could listen to people dissect Doom maps for hours... while I enjoy the doom radio intermission stuff, this is definitely filling a void that Tarnsman / Alfonzo doom radio episodes from several years ago filled, and which has been largely lacking otherwise.
  12. I'm going to request Castle Heng. From here: http://www.mediafire.com/?8v819qqh785509x The text file describes the levels but doesn't have actual info about the wad, so here's a general blurb I wrote up for it: I am in love with this wad. It's not pretty by any stretch, but it's everything I love about 90s maps, mixing abstract design with a clear sense of narrative (you're working your way through a castle, then you go to space, then it seems like you die, and there's a bit more beyond). It's got exploration and puzzles and the later maps in particular become very switch and line action heavy, but the maps themselves are all small so you never really get lost or bogged down by the puzzles. Some of the combat is piss easy, but you better know how to handle cyberdemons, because there are an absolute ton of them, and in all kinds of different situations: sometimes you've got the BFG, other times you've got to SSG them, and yet other times (many times) you've just got to run the hell away or dodge them while waiting for a door to very slowly drop to the floor. It's got a map that makes great use of a spawner, and another one that features zero enemies, just some light puzzles. Other maps that this kind of reminds me of: the early Odessa maps, low-fi Flynn or Evans work in general, and Cyberdreams (not as heavy on the puzzles, but definitely a lot of running around avoiding the things). Ok so that's my general pitch for people to play it (c&p'd from an earlier post), but why should you play it? Well, a couple reasons: 1) I think this wad deserves to be remembered. It took a path that few future wads would follow, and as such remains a fairly unique experience. With someone reasonably high profile playing it I think it would have a better chance to be remembered, or encourage others to explore the path. 2) It's different and it does interesting things. This goes to the first point, but it might confound some of your expectations and I'd like to see how you respond to it. 3) It's neither particularly hard nor particularly long. While it is a megawad, most of the maps are very quick. Playing it shouldn't be too onerous. 4) There are very few revenants. e: Note for down the road if you do decide to play this map: the wad really becomes trivialized if you don't pistol-start. If that is an issue, keep it in mind.
  13. fair enough, and I certainly agree that you've selected people who fit that broader mold. I think I probably did mention it in a previous year's thread, but I'll reiterate my suggestion this year to rename the Espi to the Halderman award and to shift the Espi to represent the idea of a mapper legacy that goes beyond single year releases.
  14. I guess, but those don't recognize long term contributors whose releases were infrequent enough so as to be unlikely to warrant mapper of the year in any given year, which seems like the original stated intent of the espi award. Maybe I'm wrong, but it feels like the initial award was aimed towards mapping to some extent, and that it's morphed since then. That's not a bad thing. Every single recipient has deserved it. But it's maybe a sign that there are enough lifetime achievements in both mapping and other areas to expand into a distinct separate award.