Yokai

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About Yokai

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    Green Marine
  1. For years, I have been wondering what the heck is it for. When adding it to a map, only a strange explosion frame happens before dissapearing. Other than that, it seems to be useless. Anyone knows?
  2. When you are talking about "playable are", are you talking about "area of the map where the player can walk" or "area of the map the player can interact with"? Because of this:
  3. Then let me ask: what is the difference between using a single sound-blocking ldef and none at all?
  4. Think about a situation like this: Now, lets say we have a very large and detailed map. Many times a situation similar to the one depicted in that GIF happens. Merging/joining sectors saves lots of time and effort while building the map. If we have literaly hundreds of sectors in this same situation that were deliberately merged/joined to save building time and effort, will this have any negative side effect while nodebuilding/playing? Is there any advantage, engine-wise (doom.exe and/or boom.exe), i.e. more framerate, whatever?
  5. So, apparently this is the new sound propagation feature: Could you please explain us what each colour means? It is clear that blue colour means "sound cannot reach", but now, what is the difference between that orange and the red coloured sectors? Lets say, the player is located within the highlighted sector. If he shoots, the enemies in the red sector can hear him as well as the ones in the orange, so I don't see much difference between the red and orange zones in terms of sound propagation. Thanks.
  6. Hi. I'm trying to create a quite detailed and gigantic map in Boom format. Searching google, I reach some doomworld forum thread where some people were discussing whether joining several sectors into a single sector or not. I have been always mapping by doing so, at least for the sake of easy mapping, and also (theoretically) to make the map lighter for the engine. But I am not sure about this. But some people in that thread commented that having a map with many joined sectors could lead to errors/crashes during node building. Of course, I am talking about joining sectors that are very close to each other. So basically, for a very sector-intensive map, I would like to know your thoughts about sector joining. Should we do it? Is it a good or bad habit? Does the "goods" compensate the "bads"? Please, tell me your opinion. Thanks in advance.
  7. A command line switch: -fullscreen -warp map01 -nosound -pwad mywad.wad ... The game logic you want Legacy to use. It is not the same to launch Legacy for Doom 1, Doom 2, Heretic or other. When you set "Game Auto" it means that Legacy will automatically select the most appropriate game logic according to the available IWADs. IWAD field lets you choose which IWAD to use. Lets say, you want to play Chex Quest, It may be using GAME = Doom 2 and IWAD = chex.wad, for example But if you only have CHex Quest iwad and you leave everything as default, Legacy will probably detect that Game = Doom 2 and IWAD = Chext.wad. "Play" would be a better name. But "Continue" is quite easy to understand anyway. I never had to stop and keep thinking what "Continue" would do. I hope you didn't need either. Beauty is such a subjective thing... When I installed some modern game on my windows OS, the ones that were requiring extra libs like DirectX, Visual .NET things and so on, the game prompted me to install them during installation. Slade could do the same, but it doesn't, and nobody seems to publicly protest about it. But Slade doesn't run unless I know that I need to download VC++, and a end-user that doesn't read the requirements will see Slade 3 simply crashing, trying to figure out what has happened. Name such port! I never mentioned a port but **software**. Refer to, for example, Slade. It requires from the user to separately install VC++. Not even the installation prompts you to install it, Only the webpage says that several lines below the downloading link. Also refer to Oblige, I'm not sure now, but last time I tried to run it (on a Windows machine) it rejected to do so, asking me to install I dunno what (this was some years ago). And now that you mention "port", try installing zDoom on Linux. You will see these Legacy problems like a kid's game. I'm not talking about OPTIONAL stuff at all. I can't see any source of missinformation. And also, you are trying to generalize your Windows system and saying that anything working on Windows will work the same way on Linux. Programs in Linux are installed differently, as libraries does too. On Linux libraries are system-installed. I think it is you the one spreading missinformation due to a lack of knowledge about the topic. So? That's completely irrelevant to the discussion at hand! Legacy only requires SDL as a third party dependency and as has been repeated ad infinitum...: SDL IS NOT SUPPOSED TO BE INSTALLED ON WINDOWS!!! How often does this simple fact have to be repeated until it sinks in??? It is not irrelevant at all. Otherwise, it can't be more relevant. You are taking Windows as the starting point of the discussion. Nobody told that Windows was the main target system for Legacy or the reference system. Plus if you knew something about Linux you would know that distributing SDL or other libraries among with the binaries cannot be done without a lot of trouble. Again, Legacy is mainly designed for Linux. SDL in Linux is system-installed, NOT developer-distributed. The game developer is taking as reference Linux not Windows and you are trying to run the game on Windows. It is logical that you run into trouble, the same problems that I ran into when trying to install zDoom on Linux. As you don't know much about Linux systems, you should stop complaining about how the developer should pack his program that is mainly designed and tested for a different system than yours. Of course it is not forbidden. I completely agree with you. But if you don't have any interest in how Legacy is being developed, nobody is forcing you to use it. But you don't need to give feedback like "hey your port is shit". That won't benefit anyone nor will bring anything useful to the discussion. Are you using SDL 1.x? Then the problem is not wesleyjohnson using an old windows machine, but YOU using a PRETTY OUTDATED version of SDL, specifically from the 2001. If you had bothered at least to download updated libraries, you wouldn't run into problems and you won't be here trying to discuss about problems whose source is on your part, not others'. But in either case, I can't understand how your SDL cannot create or handle 8bit surfaces because even the outdated version you are using supports 8bit surfaces. The only possible explanation that I can think of is that something is wrong in your system, given that your SDL libraries are the official and unmodified ones. Maybe in those 5 months of fresh install you installed something you shouldn't? Or if you have another plausible explanation, mind giving it, please?
  8. Sorry, but that's crap. That may be how stuff is set up on Linux, but not on Windows. And as has been said several times by several people here, there is nothing to install - unless you are dead set on breaking your system. That is false. I can name several Doom-related programs that states "requires XXXX or YYY library, you may download it from zzzzzz.com", and such library doesn't come along with those programs' packages. And is widely agreed by all Doom community to be good software, so I think the problem on your part is not that Legacy doesn't come with SDL and whatever libs it requires. So? That's completely irrelevant for a Windows distribution. Only up to an extent. Trying to install certain libraries or some specific things like LUA interpreters, LaTeX or similar things on Windows is a pain in the a**. Many times you need to manually set environment variables and mess with directories so the OS knows where everything is. And the problem is actually Windows, not the softwares, which work on Linux after a simple "apt-get install LUA LaTeX whatever". The same as I said in the first quote. Maybe you are looking for something that Legacy doesn't offer. In this case, the important part of the source port is not how the init menu looks like, but how it plays Doom. I could say the same about GZDoom. It doesn't offer the same features that, lets say Skyrim, so I should be away from GZDoom if I'm searching for something that looks like Skyrim. But I could likely agree, a more colorful and pretty menu would be nice. That's a problem. But it is his problem and his software. He is free to do whatever he wants with it. I don't think it is necessary to say that his program is crap becuase you don't agree how he wants to develop it. It runs. It run out for the box for me. I dunno what is the problem for you but on my system I only had to do write "make" from the console and everything compiled and launched without any problem. I run Legacy on my 2013 machine with one of the last Linux versions, actually, Linux Mint fully updated. Using last SDL version, modern graphics card and so on, I didn't have any problem. I would dare to say that you have something messed up in your machine or you use unsuported hardware. It seems that Legacy only works on systems that are compatible with 15+ years old computers, and your computer isn't compatible, so you can't run Legacy. It is not the developer's fault but yours for trying to play a game that is not compatible with your system.
  9. In defense of wesleyjohnson, I have to say, he is mainly developing a software for a certain platform (Linux), AS HE ALREADY STATED. Under this system, it works flawlessly, never crashes and once you have all requirements (i.e. SDL libs, MIDI, whatever) you DO NOT need to copy and mess with them at all. If you have problems stablishing all requirements for your Windows machine, it may mean either: 1.- You didn't installed the required libraries because you didn't read the requirement or didn't even took the time to know what was needed to run game. 2.- The software is designed to look for the libraries in a folder that is not the same as the Windows uses, because Linux uses different file system. 3.- You installed the wrong libraries' version. This doesn't only happens with Doom Legacy. Every software is designed to work with a specific libraries' version. It is as if a game is asking you to install DirectX 9 but you reject to do it. The game won't work, and you can't blame the developers. On the other hand, I tested Legacy 1.45 beta 1 two days ago, and I didn't have any problem trying to guess how the menu works. I find that menu pretty self-explanatory and easy to understand, even from the first time I saw it. In fact, you can leave all fields of the menu untouched, and only pressing "Continue" will launch the game. Do you need something easier? In the image below, Legacy detected the folders by itself, I didn't have to write anything at all, only move the cursor down and press continue. Which part of that menu do you feel so hard to understand? Also, providing binaries for additional platforms doesn't translate into the software being 100% compatible or the developers offering full support for that platform. And do not forget it is a BETA version, which means it contain bugs and problems, and even more if you run it under untested and half-supported platforms. Don't expect a fully working program.
  10. Actually, I found what the problem was. The '<THINGS>' marker was missing. Now doing only edge -file foo.ddfworks. I don't even need to copy all other DDFs. Thanks for help anyway.
  11. Following your instructions, I copied all the DDFs into my custom folder. Then I replaced the things.ddf with my own things ddf, where the only thing defined is a modified zombieman. This is, the only contents in my DDF is the 'ZOMBIEMAN:3004' thing. But when loading edge, I don't get any more missing DDFs but EDGE doesn't seem to read the original DDFs at all, so it crashes with a "Unknown thing type: CLIP Error occurred in entry: [ZOMBIEMAN] (things.ddf)"like if he doesn't even knows that Clip thing is already defined withing the original edge_ddf/things.ddf. What I need is to just tell EDGE to use the 'ZOMBIEMAN:3004' that I provide in my custom things.ddf, and replace the original zombieman with my own zombieman. It seems that the only solution is to use the DDF from within a .WAD? Or is there any other solution? I know zDoom allows loading external scripts with a simple command line argument without any trouble. I guess if EDGE has/will have this aswell. Thanks.
  12. Hi there. I'm trying to load an external DDF file for EDGE. Lets say my DDF is "foo.ddf" into a folder "bar". This DDF has a monster definition that works well if I include it into "things.ddf" EDGE seems to provide two command line arguments to load external/additional DDFs: -ddf <dir> Load external DDF files from the directory. -game <dir> Game dir, for PARMS, DDF, RTS, WADs, etc.But none of them seems to work. It returns me "Missing languages!" error just upon launching EDGE. I tried copying all languages .ldf files, but I get the same error again. Is there any way to solve this without replacing the original EDGE things.ddf? Thanks in advance.
  13. Just hanging around to ask Andrew if something is going to happen around...
  14. Yes, it works. Thanks.
  15. I mean, resurrect/reactivate the forums. BTW: Now, Andrew, can you explain this? If what Jayextee stated there is true, do you, Andrew, even remotely know what that would allow to achieve? Right now my brain is flooding with thousand of effects that I want to test and try in an EDGE project I'm working on right now. Your assistance here is now a must!!! Resistance is futile...