S-Priest

Members
  • Content count

    64
  • Joined

  • Last visited

About S-Priest

  • Rank
    Mini-Member
  1. This is ZDoom 2.7.1 with Hexen bugfixes. Fixed by Shanjaq with input from and testing by Sidhe Priest Bugfixes 1. The heresiarch shields no longer make them invulnerable - they'll only deflect projectiles, as in the original game. Arc of Death, mace, fighter gauntlets and axe and hammer in melee mode will still affect heresiarches. 2. Correct Hexen/Heretic flight model: view is decoupled from heading direction. Now you can fire on monsters from above and not crash into them! 3. Wings of Wrath will no longer expire in Hexen co-op (they behave the same as in singleplayer, removed at an episode's end). 4. Porkelator spelling fixed. Download at the Hexen Soundtrack page (it's called "ZHexen").
  2. It sounds decent here on the monitor speakers, but then it didn't quite sound right on the pocket player. The saw lead didn't quite come out...
  3. By loading GM.dls. The full path is %systemroot\system32\drivers\gm.dls. The default MS soft synth mixes at 22 KHz, FL must be using a higher sampling rate, interpolated. The original samples are only 32-KHz, by the way. Here's something mixed with a new drum sampler: http://www.solarstudios.net/Music/D_E1M7.flac
  4. Sounds like the SC-55, those might be licensed Roland samples then. The Windows GS soft synth is based on Roland Sound Canvas samples, Fruity Loops must be using them too... It could just be loading the default Windows DLS file. The actual samples are from 1991 methinks... 1996 would just be the last revision.
  5. So people still use the SC-55 drumkit, do they?
  6. http://www.theoldcomputer.com/gamemusic/index.php?folder=Nintendo/SNES/Doom - if that is it, then that's really screechy. Anyway, this new mix doesn't deviate much from the original MIDI score, notes are exactly the same. The only difference is a slightly more technical/machine feel to the strings. The aim is actually for the drums to sound pretty close to the original Roland Sound Canvas samples Doom scores were composed with.
  7. Any links to the SNES version? What sort of synthesis did that use anyway? The drumkit samples are new, it's a bit of a test for the 2nd snare (light, G#). A saw lead is always a saw lead, this one just has a lot of effects on it. Also the strings aren't quite as simple, they're a combination of virtual DX7 (opening part) with another virtual analogue synth with some real string samples.
  8. Updated with a few changes.
  9. Well there, it's a bit of a test of new drum samples. Someone's asked for more "ambiental" mixes, so here's one. http://www.solarstudios.net/MP3/D_E1M7.html
  10. Here is the CD version. It's a .bin/.cue pair, so something like Virtual Clonedrive or Daemon Tools is required to mount it as a virtual CD. Mageslayer will read audio off the first CD drive, so the virtual drive letter has to be lower than the real CD drive letter with the original Mageslayer CD in it. It could also be burned on a physical CD, of course. A couple notes though... 1. This is a beta-test of a new sampler and some mixing techniques more than anything. 2. This was made for private listening. Curiously it came out right, and in fact it plays better over the game's sounds than the original soundtrack CD, but it was always intended to be played as 96/24 FLAC on fairly accurate speakers (and headphones).
  11. There is a lot to be said about Creative buying out Ensoniq and killing off their TS- line of synths. Which were marvellous (the TS-10 played the Hexen II/Heretic II soundtracks). Holering: how do you get such huge Soundfonts to work with the Live at all? The Live could only hog 32 MBs of wave data at a time, and on Creative native drivers anything that went over the limit very quickly caused note dropouts and frozen samples. This was sort of half-solved in the newer NT 5.x drivers by killing off layers/voices if they went over the limit, but then that sounded uglier. Is there some sort of a miraculous Linux driver?
  12. Latency is the time it takes for a sequencer to process notes. As an example, a good latency time with an ASIO driver on a Firewire sound interface is 1.5 milliseconds. That is the combined delay of a multicore CPU running a soft synth plus all the overhead of the MIDI controller driver, OS kernel, and whatever else gets in the way (low-level Firewire driver, bus drivers, etc.). Without a professional sound interface, working in Directx/waveout/KS/whatever else mode there is with a soundcard, the best latency time is likely around 15-20 msec. That's more or less tolerable for slow pads, but not for percussion or fast playing. What might be happening is that you've set the latency too low for your soundcard, so the soft synth is simply dropping out notes because it doesn't have enough buffers. Raise latency delay/increase the number and size of buffers in the app's config.
  13. What's your latency? Playing with high latency can have a similar effect (keys register, but notes trigger with a lag). Also, never, ever connect it through an unpowered USB hub. The LPK-25 (as most higher-power/speed USB devices) requires a PC USB socket connection, or at least an external high-speed powered hub.
  14. Weird, the one here's been working fine for years, in spite of riding in the backpack most of the time. The only trouble with it is, label paint's been shedding.
  15. "New" is not the intent. It's just the soundtrack meant for whichever ports can play the files. The goal is more of an accurate rendition rather than any fancy out-of-tempo remixes and such... There are some new samples though, the drumkit, and the guitar slide noise in "Suspense".