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‹rd›

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  1. ‹rd›

    The DWMiniwad Club Plays: [various things]

    L'Agonie Final is a standalone bonus map that wraps up the the 3 heures d'agonie megawad trilogy, which consists of three-hour speedmaps (or """3-hour speedmaps""" in the case of darkwave0000's contributions). It is made of seven speedmapped parts linked by a central hub that also contains the exit. Beating them all, in any order, allows you to open the exit. [Btw I don't think you need to have played any of the 3ha series to play this.] This time I played through the map sections in numerical order. 01 (Roofi) This is really pretty. It reminds me a lot of Kama Sutra, with all the trees, the houses, the ash and rocks, the faux-3D bridges made of STEPTOP, and the... giant mushroom. Combine that naturalism with a preference for bright colors, like blue and red and green, and it has a really comfy vibe. I could hang out here longer, although I'd definitely pick the southern chunk of the map. (I definitely would not risk ever crossing the 3D bridge. It functions well enough in the Doom engine, but I can't imagine STEPTOP is a sturdy material at all. So my ever visiting that portion hinges entirely on my ability to recruit the air transport services of a friendly cacodemon.) Gameplay unfolds as a series of small-scale fights, ranging from incidental to trappy. Many of the traps are set up in sneaky, clever ways, such as the baron team that springs to pin you in a small room unless you flee quickly. I thought this scene was pretty sexy, with its hint at many layers of progression all at once. The broad shape of progression is a steady upward ascent -- climbing rocky steps, riding lifts. Despite the brevity of this map(let), it ends up feeling like a journey. I don't remember feeling this was my favorite section when I first played this map a couple of years ago, but it might be now! I really enjoyed it. 02 (Datacore) This section reminds me of a few Datacore standalone releases I've played. It has the SP_HOT and earthy rocks of Hellish Breakfast, and the Wolfenstein bricks of Bluish Awakening. Overall it is crunched and compact like many of them. Monsters are packed densely, which is well suited for rocket launcher use, and SS Nazis are used as regular monsters. This type of Wolfenstein imagery alongside more traditional hellish architecture often feels like an alt-universe corruption of hell, like the Nazi terrain is bleeding into the environment, reshaping it, stuffing it with Hitler mustaches unseen. Not bad, but the cyberdemon room could have been less densely populated. 03 (FranckFrag) FranckFrag's is the toughest one yet, also the first section I got more than spot duty out of the plasma rifle. The name of the game is cooly holding off stuff with the rocket launcher: like with the cacos, you want to spam rockets from safety, and clear most of them out, before dropping down and alerting the army of shit guarding the exit. This section has a nice moody 'city at night' look to it -- the darkness is really striking. It struck me that a lot of the assets, like grass, compblu, modwall, and such, are normally associated with a cheerier mood. The low light levels and the MIDI had other ideas. I also really liked how one of the perimeter buildings -- which you'd expect to serve as decoration if you've seen similar structures in other maps -- is used as a big monster closet that harbors a cacodemon cloud. I wouldn't spend as much time living here as in Roofi's section. First, I don't really like large clusters of monsters in my living space. I can talk down a rowdy chaingunner or two, but I don't like herding goats. And then, one must wonder what would inhabit the building that didn't open up. Pain elementals? It is probably a giant orgy of pain elementals. A nice touch here. 'UAC symbols replicated with sector drawing' is one of those subgenres of micro detailing that stretches across the eras. At this point, I accidentally pick up the chainsaw in the start hub and contemplate restarting the game. 04 (JCD) This was even shorter than I expected after peeking at the automap. The overall structure is what I'd call a 'Scythe base' -- a lot of abstract 90- and 45-degree angles, areas bent around each other like a pretzel, mostly mono-textured. Being an efficient way of mapping at this time-frame, it isn't an uncommon speedmap archetype. Big hairy bollocks, testing if anyone's reading. Gameplay has some intense moments: I had to whip out the plasma rifle for the first archvile at the YK McGuffin switch before it revived too many of the cacos I had killed nearby. Before the exit, the floor suddenly collapses and tosses you into a den of hell knights, an archvile watching overhead. It ain't much, but it's honest Dooming. 05 (Jambon) Let's lead with a bit of background on relevant punnery. The author's name is Jean Bon, which is a homonym of the French word 'jambon', which translates to 'ham'. Jean Bon's (jambon)'s signature? A ham bone. ...how do you like them apples? That is apparently a well known entendre chain in the Francosphere. Because of course it is. This section is sparse visually -- we have a layout shaped suspiciously like a leg of pork, mostly textured in STONE (must have been overcooked), with computer panels inlaid in many of the walls. Victory follows from very skilled handling of boners. The conceit here is a sort of double surprise. First comes the realization that literally every monster is a revenant. Then you realize that no, you were entirely wrong: suddenly, threatening to undo your diligent skeletal suppression, it's the firetwinks, spread out everywhere, reviving all those boners anew. 06 (Oxyde) This part reminded me of the meat and potatoes of FranckFrag's section (I expect food idioms to now appear relentlessly) -- a lot of clumped-up, beefy hordes. Nothing wrong with that, but being a mode that has been explored in a few other sections already, it suffers from the luck of the draw in terms of where I have eaten played it. I did appreciate the effort to spice up the action with gimmicks: mancubi that want to blow you the absolute fuck up with heaps and heaps of barrels, and that crusher switch 'trap'. The last fight only works well if you want to kill the pair of cyberdemons quickly, by sticking around and plasma-ing them down at close range. It turns into a grind if you camp them at any point. Visually it is clean and tidy. Bare in most places, with a few rooms that are more polished and refined, like: 07 (WH-Wilou) Oh yeah, this one is big. Big as fuck in fact. No wonder an earlier version of it was released as its own (limit-removing) map. It's not quite a darkwave0000 proxy in terms of size relative to the rest -- 3ha2 map28 could eat this section whole and still have room for a couple of copy-pasted versions of it, then scarf down Jambon (as in the mapper) too because yum why not -- but it fits the role well enough. After some mid-scale slaughter, the map highlight takes place in an area shaped like a giant baron head. It's a multi-phase fight involving rev-archie warps, a cyb that needs to be killed, switches that need to be pressed, a whole bunch of meat and higher-priority threats like PEs to complicate things, and 70% of the area soaked in damaging blood -- all with just a pair of radsuits to hold you over. You can take the 'active' route and try to do everything in roughly the time of two radsuits. That requires a lot of fine-tuned planning: my strat leads with taking off like 2000 HP from the cyb with the plasma rifle just so I can kill it later when my radsuit has almost faded, before ditching the still-alive cyb and killing other things -- a strat honed by the Science of playing more intuitively first, leaving the cyb to infight, before realizing 'holy fuck I have no more radsuit to kill this cyb now'. Or you can save a radsuit for just pressing the switches and killing the cyb and leaving at the end, and hole up in the safe circle with the pillar and fend off the multi-species invasion from both sides, with the cyber raining its long-range artillery every now and then. This fight is fun mechanically and it is complex. Visually, this is pretty standard as far as architecture goes. Feels kind of darkwave000-ish, actually. It distinguishes itself more through the unusual texture scheme. It has a lot of assets that normally wouldn't go together: the rare REDWALL, blood, BROWN1, pipes and techy stuff. It is kind of an odd mishmash, but the way the map... err section... is designed, it gels well and gives it a pleasing aesthetic. Overall I liked it. 1 and 7 are my favorite. [awkward pause] What? Expected more here? SLAM that like button and maybe you'll get it!
  2. ...what? What is the DWMiniwad Club? It's like the DWMegawad Club, but we'll focus on single maps and smaller mapsets (smaller refers to the amount of content, not necessarily map count). Where the DWMegawad Club aims to fill most of its days, this club won't, so that you can still maintain an active slate of other Doom obligations. How will maps be selected? I will pick them, drawing almost entirely from a pool of user suggestions. My goal is to maintain at least some diversity in the selections (along vectors like difficulty and art style) -- so I won't simply choose the wads that get the most votes. Please hold your suggestions until the 26th of the month. How do I participate? Play, do write-ups, etc. You can play any or all of the month's offerings. When a set contains multiple maps, you can do a single write-up for the set or one for each map. What are those dates beside wads? To help with organization, the month is staggered: wads are "unlocked" for commenting on a certain day, on which they become available forever in case you're late. Why aren't the dates spread out evenly over the whole month? This is to satisfy a balance between keeping discussion tidy while not forcing someone to wait until late in a month if they are only going to play one or two things. If you're playing everything, feel free to stagger out your play more evenly -- you don't have to play a wad on the very day it becomes unlocked. What are bonus wads? Usually, bonus content might require a lesser-used source port or iwad, involve a niche game mode (such as multiplayer or rocket jumping), or even focus on a gameplay mod rather than maps. It is designated as bonus content to acknowledge that not everyone might want to go to the necessary lengths to play it. This month, dead.air is just a carryover from last month, when not a lot of people were around who wanted to play a GZDoom map. Will you bring back the awkwardly long titles?! Maybe! Why the fuck was this thread started on the 30th? I did not notice this month had 31 days until it was too late. I will normally start it on the last day of the month. Wad 1 (July 30): Kurogane (1 vanilla map by Memfis) Wad 2 (August 1): Technicolor Antichrist Box (1 large GZDoom map by Major Arlene [GZDoom 4.1.1. or later; the author recommends HNTR and HMP for non-slaughter players]) Wad 3 (August 4): The Mean Green (3 Boom maps by Chris Hansen) Wad 4 (August 8): Exalt Not the Wicked (1 vanilla map by ReX Claussen [is on map11]) Wad 5 (August 10): L'agonie Finale (1 large vanilla map by multiple authors [has challenging slaughter sections; HMP is a mild nerf, and HNTR is a much bigger one]) BONUS (any): Dead.air (1 GZDoom map by Xaser) Previous Threads
  3. EDIT 2020: I disown this thread and regret starting it... Of course, the way these threads usually turn out, it's probably going to be a compilation of pseudoedgy opinions that most people actually believe, but whatever. Anyway: I'm getting extremely tired of the term "slaughter" in any form. The fact that it even exists bunches up my panties because it normalizes "non-slaughter gameplay" and positions slaughter in some kind of niche, when -- to me at least -- a lot of what people consider slaughter gameplay is NORMAL Doom, and you have to go way up to Sunder or CS2 scale before I consider a map a slaughtermap. How about we call slaughtermaps just maps, and invent the term "WEENIEMAP" for the combat-centric maps that don't fit the slaughter or claustrophobia or whatever else categories. (Yes, I also think it's fine -- nay, CORRECT -- to retroactively relabel old maps once considered to be slaughtermaps according to the evolved standards and expectations of the present day. Fluidity of language and all.)
  4. From time to time I have questions that I don't feel deserve their own threads, and others probably do as well, hence the existence of this thread. -- Here's a "circle" with a radius of around 16400 mu. I want to use it as a "sea". The actual playable area of the map would be much smaller, of course. Will this result in blockmap (or other) issues in Boom, and what's the largest this circle can be before these bad things happen?
  5. SIGIL final boss. It can't be killed and it crashes the game when it looks at you. Really though, being more creative wouldn't have required a new boss. SIGIL reliably used the environment as a direct threat, such as with crushers, darkness, damaging hellcracks, footpaths crumbling beneath you in lava, and really thin rocky strips of land you had to inch across. A boss fight using elements like that right in the middle of battle would have been cool -- and also a significant change-up from the flat arenas of "Tower of Babel" and "Dis."
  6. ‹rd›

    Post your Doom video! [but don't quote video]

    some random Sunlust stuff Casual max of 29 with the actually kinda reliable fast strategy for the first part. Didn't practice before this to have exact approaches ready (just relied on having played it previously), so the rest is pretty messy at times, but I'm trying to be more comfortable sharing videos like that. ;)
  7. [flexes] I like them because I'm hardcore. In fact I'm so hardcore I always force a pistol start multiple times within the same map. Serious answer: megawads that take after Scythe 2 use an episodic structure deliberately. Modern ones, in ports that support this, even have episode selection at the new game menu. While playing Ultimate Doom, people tend not to complain about the grave injustice of losing their weapons after finishing off the Bruiser Brothers and starting on The Shores of Hell -- so I think you just have to look at the megawad the right way.
  8. ‹rd›

    Which Doom II enemy is worse than the arch-vile

  9. What is the DWMiniwad Club? It's like the DWMegawad Club, but we'll focus on single maps and smaller mapsets. Where the DWMegawad Club aims to fill most of its days, this club won't, so that you can still maintain an active slate of other Doom obligations. How will maps be selected? I will pick them, drawing almost entirely from a pool of user suggestions. My goal is to maintain at least some diversity in the selections (along vectors like difficulty and art style) -- so I won't simply choose the wads that get the most votes. Please hold your suggestions until the 26th of the month. How do I participate? Play, do write-ups, etc. You can play any or all of the month's offerings. When a set contains multiple maps, you can do a single write-up for the set or one for each map. What are those dates beside wads? To help with organization, the month is staggered: wads are "unlocked" for commenting on a certain day, on which they become available forever in case you're late. Why aren't the dates spread out evenly over the whole month? This is to satisfy a balance between keeping discussion tidy while not forcing someone to wait until late in a month if they are only going to play one or two things. If you're playing everything, feel free to stagger out your play more evenly -- you don't have to play a wad on the very day it becomes unlocked. What are bonus wads? Bonus content might require a lesser-used source port or iwad, involve a niche game mode (such as multiplayer or rocket jumping), or even focus on a gameplay mod rather than maps. It is designated as bonus content to acknowledge that not everyone might want to go to the necessary lengths to play it. Wad 1 (June 30): Uplink (3 Boom-format maps by Katamori) Wad 2 (July 4): Woodcraft (1 vanilla map by Roofi) Wad 3 (July 6): Crossing Acheron (1 vanilla Doom 1 map [e1m3] by Dr. Sleep) Wad 4 (July 8): The Eye (1 Boom-format map by Mouldy) Wad 5 (July 10): Oberon Base (1 vanilla map by Simo Malinen) No bonus stuff this month! Previous Threads
  10. ‹rd›

    The DWMiniwad Club Plays: [various things]

    A reminder: I don't go by all five letters anymore. I just requested a 'custom rank' reset, since that might be a source of confusion.
  11. ‹rd›

    The DWMiniwad Club Plays: [various things]

    Kurogane An /idgames reviewer described Kurogane, one of Memfis's innumerable single-map releases, as 'austere', and that is a good way to sum it up. Health is scarce. Gaining an ammo surplus? Yeah, good luck with that lol. The facility we're rummaging is lit like whichever non-demons inhabited it last -- and recently too, judging by the lights still shining in the residential quarters, and the unblemished couches! -- wanted to go lean on electricity costs. Progression builds itself as spotlights in shadow, as bright rooms and illuminated switches that emerge out of twisted darkness. Out of these scarcities, I'd say Memfis has threaded together an enjoyable experience. All the long, snaky tunnels are so dark that it's hard, at first, as you look into them, to gauge where they might lead or where they might end, which paths exist and which don't -- just that monsters lurk and that one must be careful. Peering into the unknown becomes eerie. Entire closets and alcoves are devoted to little more than a lone medkit or a row of assorted bonuses. You yoink those happily. Tension is high, small mistakes have meaning. Whatever fact: If you IDCLIP into the map's northeast, this unreachable area looks partly though development, like it was intended as the map's final area before, maybe, "ah fuck it, I'm tired of working on this."
  12. ‹rd›

    Back to Saturn X Episode 3 [WIP]

    [furious typing sounds] I have hacked into the BTSX e3 changelogs.
  13. ‹rd›

    Post your Doom video! [but don't quote video]

    Just some gameplay of Sunlust map14. :^)
  14. ‹rd›

    How does one get good at Doom?

    I would suggest learning the value and how-tos of maneuvering and positioning. This is something you don't see discussed too much explicitly, but it's probably the most important concept for improvement. I did a video of Valiant map04, and I deliberately tried to avoid anything showy or mechanically demanding, but the map probably looks quite easy. That is because a lot of the danger of the map is constantly being preempted and defused -- kind of sneakily -- by solid maneuvering in combat. A clear example begins around 1:00 when I'm clearing up the imps and cacos. At one point, I drop down and I'm fighting a caco, but I know there is an imp to the side of me, so I move forward/backwards and preemptively dodge any possible imp projectiles. A lot of that stuff isn't easy to notice -- to an observer who hasn't played the map, it often goes overlooked and just looks like the map is easy to begin with -- but it's the main thing going on. Stuff like that fills the whole video such that in most encounters, I don't take too much damage. Or more importantly (since 'reality'-ing a map isn't necessarily playing better or what the player is out to do) such that my 'death probability' is as low as the map might allow. (Which here is near-zero.) The main way people are already familiar with the value of 'practical combat movement' is, like, circle-strafing messy hordes in arenas that are too big. You abstract dodging and reflex requirements out of those fights by just moving in a circle. But that general concept also applies in lots of different ways: other patterns (e.g. figure-eighting, U-strafing), movement tactics (e.g. tap-moving for the sake of bullet-herding), or just moving through fights along specific paths with specific movement speeds (rather than understanding strategy purely in verbal terms like 'kill the imps, then pick up health, then get the cyb infighting, etc.' -- which isn't always the best approach). This is too rigid imo. Any weapon can be good for any monster or group depending on the scenario. In the Valiant video, I don't use anything weaker than the SSG (even against lone zombies and imps) because a) I know the map has enough ammo and b) weapon switching is often slower, often leaves you vulnerable, and adds another thing to keep track of for what, in this map at least, would top out at very limited gain. Or another example: Common wisdom is that rockets are bad for pain elementals, right? Well... what if you play a fight where it's your only serious way of dealing enough DPS before they overwhelm you. :)
  15. Afrits: HP (2500) is too high for how they are used in Scythe 2, which is often floating in the air in open spaces. Their hitbox is also small, which exacerbates the trouble of grinding them down. They need to be really close to you if you want to get a good burst of BFG tracers in. Their internal "mass" value, equal to that of the cacodemon, is too low (that is why they are flung backwards in the air so easily). Mayhem '18 Purple has a floating monster with identical HP -- the immolator -- but it's so much easier to hit, especially with BFG tracers, that it feels noticeably less tanky. It also has a much more satisfying death animation than the afrit's 'poof out of existence with a baron scream' -- which is not an insignificant part of what makes a monster fun. I like the afrit's firestorm attack, even if it could be more nuanced. It's a fun source of danger both in open spaces and cramped ones. Evil marines: I find these fun to fight but they are so dangerous relative to other Doom monsters that the game feels discontinuous while they exist -- "now we're playing Doom... now we're playing Evil Marines where the other Doom monsters that are present in the area are more or less a footnote... now we're back to playing Doom." Nerfing speed or HP or some combination of both is a good call. Running Late by A2Rob has really good nerfed variants.
  16. Doom maps can handle storytelling in many ways. It can range from being the primary uniting force behind decision choices -- like in Going Down -- to something that reads as more of a pure detour within an otherwise abstract map. A story might be told almost entirely by setting and design elements of a map that hardly change, or it might exist only in changes or in moment from one place to another. Sometimes the connections you make might be the author's intent; sometimes unexpected resonances might lead to wild and personal interpretations. You might naturally think of a wad's story and throughline all at once, on a larger scale, or one map might contain a single zombieman in a boat (named Kevin) whose existence contains all the mysteries of hell. Any given wad might focus on one approach -- or there might be countless active at once, interacting, intertwining. All of that is a tl;dr intro to explain that if you are doubting something is suitable for this thread, assume it is (within reason) as long as you can describe it!
  17. It is kind of a 'play by ear' size thing. No other way to do it, because a map is a highly varying unit of measurement and playtime is impossible to predict. Lunatic and Syringe have 5 and 6 maps but most are pretty light in content. Also the DWMC enforces a four-map minimum, so I'm inclined to be slightly more lenient with size below that mark, where the dwmc is the only option. But there are still limits. Feel free to keep suggesting sets though. It's not annoying me or anything. The worst that will happen is I'll explain that it's too big and allow you to swap in something else. I would prefer to pick something by everyone as much as is reasonable to do. So I'd rather not just silently ignore it. The Slaughter Spectrum at its size is more fitting for when the Megawad club packages mapsets, and Impromptu Minidido will always be very unlikely with its multi-hour runtime.
  18. ‹rd›

    Horse Shoe

    Horseshoe is a mid-sized map that reminded me visually of the Starbase cluster of Doom 2's first episode, with a bit of Knee-Deep in the Dead mixed in. It could have used stronger lighting, but it's still comfy. Gameplay starts out as free-form area clearing with the weaker guns, but once you get the first key, it leans into traps and specific scenarios that require nimbleness. I found those scenarios fun. As a neutral observation, the difficulty on UV is a couple of notches higher than the description -- "[a] classic, oldschool Doom 2 map" -- might lead you to expect. 7/10. Actual Review (you've been warned...): This starts off deceptively: pop imps with the shotgun, cha-cha with the chaingun, pet a caco here, boop a hell knight there, you know the drill. Then after you get the first key, the danger levels spike out of nowhere, with cheeky traps stacked one after another. And we're just getting started. Enough cheeky. Now for buttcheeky. Lording over much of the rest of the map from here on out: a cyberdemon you first meet in a nukage chamber. Your task is unclear, your radsuit is wasting away. You don't have the ammo to kill it, so you don't engage. It hounds you anyway. It must not like your sense of fashion. Haven't you heard? Hooves and horns are in style. Where to go? Out of the corner of your visor, you spot a tiny door, stashed off to the side, in a very awkward spot. Careful to avoid the artillery trained on your ass, you dash to open the door and stumble into a network of dusty, pitch-black hallways. There, you flail for your life against denizens of the dark who are all too happy to give you the funny business, and pry open the next leg of your journey. Walls crumble and fall. Clarity is all you want. A flashlight is all you need. But wait, it's never that easy. "Hey bud, da fuck!?" you hear. The cybie is ever so eager to pounce on the opportunity to join up again. "I thought we were friends uwu!" Okay, "friends" -- just for now. In the next area, convincing it to kill a batch of loitering monsters is not so tough. It must be warming up to your outfit choices. Things are going swell. Things are gonna be fine. But friendships never last with such a glaring imbalance in clovenness. It's just not in the balance of it all. With no warning, you're given an ugly ballistic haircut as a rocket whizzes past your ear. Fuck, that took six months to grow! Now it's for real. If you can hold back your rage for a bit longer, you might lure cybie into the next-to-last area and put it to work against its encampment of pesky ledge snipers. You might use it to clear out the lingering barons, useless byproducts of a botched copy-pasta job in some UAC simulator, before settling your score once and for all against your woefully underqualified barber. You might find the key that unlocks the exit. Don't fail. To fail and to succumb is to admit that being dressed in the finest combat armor that money can buy is tactically inferior to lugging around an oversized rocket launcher in the nude. That time spent pawning extra computer area maps and chainsaws will be all for naught.
  19. I am going to remove Dead.air from this month's listings and use it as next month's bonus wad. If you have a write-up, hold on to it. 60 Secrets is pretty deceptive in size. If you glance at the overheads, it looks like six smallish maps. But the maps have a lot of content, especially if you want to find all the secrets the title refers to. It takes quite a bit more time to get through than, say, Ray Mohawk's Manic Monday. It's approaching "bigger than intended for this club," if not over that already.
  20. ‹rd›

    How much do you play or used to play Doom?

    Some days more than others, but on average, around an hour or so.
  21. The monsters in that screenshot shouldn't be SS Nazis. They should be one of Scythe 2's new custom enemies, which are essential to the experience. The mod you are using, its settings, or your load order might be fucking with them.
  22. ‹rd›

    What do you think of mods like brutal Doom?

    The title is odd because Brutal Doom is synecdochal for gameplay mods only among those who are kinda unfamiliar with gameplay mods. And if you are into gameplay mods, then Brutal Doom itself is more of a footnote in most places. (Project Brutality is the reigning brutalike anyway.) Gameplay mods are some of the things I play. I like them. My recent playlist -- as in, this week -- includes Highway Acceleroid Booster ("you play as a robot girl that's part car and part super fighting robot") and Combined Arms: Gaiden (cool 8-bit weapons and capabilities: such as grappling hooks, jet packs, a swinging hammer that smashes the ground and sends all monsters in the vicinity flying for massive damage). Variety and novelty are a big part of the pluses. Also that feeling of dangling at the steep end of the learning curve, that rush of new information and new insights and new experiences. Mods are often pretty rich with backstory and lore and in-jokes and Easter eggs too. Discoveries in DRLA (Doom Roguelike Arsenal) are never-ending. They won't usurp vanilla for me, but diving into modded play has certainly enriched my appreciation of the game.
  23. Yeah the caco attack windup is pretty negligible, which makes punching them tricky. There is a sort of repeated zigzag motion one can make to minimize danger, which I show in this video. At one point, a caco attacks several times within a couple of seconds and none of those attacks hit, which is the main advantage of that motion. The main disadvantage is that it's tricky to land punches that way. I think practically, if a map actually forces you to punch the odd caco or two, treating it as a probable payment of health/armor and just rushing the caco is an option too. That is the one way a caco is forgiving in Tyson scenarios -- the other projectile mid-tiers won't play as nicely with you deciding to tank all of their attacks.
  24. ‹rd›

    Regret and Despair

    With the first two lines, you are still minimizing the impact of the cheating and showing that you fail to grasp its severity. Like, you realize that above a certain level of skill, especially in a non-RNG category like -nomonsters, 'one or a few tiny mistakes away from the desired time' represents most of the challenge? Getting the time you actually got before you edited it isn't the hard part. Many people could get those times with similar effort. Shaving off those last remaining tics in an actual fair run is the hard part. It's not 'hey I did basically everything, I just fucked up in a silly way, so let's just do a bit of cheatin' -- no big deal, brooo, just a tic or two'; that time you are shaving off is everything. Everyone fucks up that silly way at something in the otherwise successful run a really high % of the time -- if that something isn't the exact mistake you made, it would have been something else. That is part of being human. That is part of not being depr4vity perfect. Avoiding all of those mistakes entirely in a run is the hard and arduous part. Cheaters often justify their cheating with the belief that they are just manufacturing a result they would have gotten regardless with just a bit more time, with just a bit more focus, if something went just a bit better. Cheating is still just as bad even if that's true. But it's usually not true. So you're not only lying to everyone, you're also lying to yourself. "Buuuut I only kept cheating because I thought I was going to get away with it!!!" Now I see that whole first part of my response is pointless because you lack any morals.
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