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kuchitsu

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About kuchitsu

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  1. 200 - 169 = 31, but if I say that I watched episodes 169-200 of Detective Conan, that means that I watched 32 episodes. This just doesn't feel right. How do I learn to count this stuff correctly and, more importantly, how do I convince my brain that the method is indeed correct?

    1. Ribbiks

      Ribbiks

      extremely basic stuff, but apparently not a terribly uncommon problem:

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Off-by-one_error#Fencepost_error

      here's a thread where the explanations might be easier to understand:

      http://math.stackexchange.com/questions/484393/why-do-you-add-1-in-counting-test-questions

    2. scifista42

      scifista42

      kuchitsu said:

      how do I convince my brain that the method is indeed correct?

      My method of turning math/logic principles from unintuitive to intuitive for my brain is thinking of concrete analogies with small numbers and/or a small range of numbers. If you know you watched episodes 9-10, it's clear that you watched 2 in total. If they were 9-11, it's 3 in total. Basic, but whatever. If you repeat thinking about this analogy every time you're in doubt, and at least several times over a longer period of time, it should get intuitive even for larger numbers.

    3. Tracer

      Tracer

      Just remember that in the first example, you are stating the difference. In the second example, you are counting everything.

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