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LouigiVerona

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Everything posted by LouigiVerona

  1. Hey everyone! I'd like to discuss the design methodology of maps that feature fast-paced, almost arcade-like gameplay that's prevalent in a lot of modern wads. Think Valiant (especially the Moon levels), Antaresian Reliquary, etc. When I am inspired by maps like these and want to attempt to make a map with a similar feel, I realize that there are a lot of things I am not sure how to do, and so I wanted to hear everyone's opinions, advice and thoughts. The design of the maps in question seems to have these general characteristics: Fairly open and connected architecture Small rooms and corridors are rare, and when there are rooms and corridors (think Antaresian Reliquary, MAP06), everything tends to be connected at multiple angles. In general, rooms tend to have more interesting shapes and connect with each other at different junctures There's usually a high variation of heights Spaces tend to be very large The player is not forced into a linear progression, and any path you take, it's interesting and well-balanced. In fact, a big part of attractiveness of these maps is that their replay value is high at least because of how differently one could choose to tackle each map A lot of automation By which I mean that these maps tend to take advantage of gradually opening sections of the map, sometimes in ways not anticipated by the first time player. Every column, every wall has the potential to contain additional monsters, and existing structures tend to get transformed through lowering of floors and such throughout the level's progress Very well-designed fights Although spaces are open, monster encounters (traps and placement) are very well controlled, almost regardless of which weapons you currently have Good control over sniper monsters. Snipers do exist, but are usually very well used. These are my general observations. Perhaps someone can add additional points. When I am trying to design a map like this, I run into difficulties which demonstrate that I don't entirely understand the design principles behind these modern maps and exactly how should a map designer think about it. Specifically, and in no particular order, I have difficulties with these concepts: The architecture of these levels, although frequently breathtaking, is, first of all, practical. It facilitates fun gameplay and the way rooms are positioned seems to be dividing the level into scenes. However, I am not sure how helpful it is to think about this way, and if it is, what's the right way of going about it. When I design maps, I frequently feel that I don't know where to start and I don't know what I am doing. Like, what should my intent with the architecture be. Modern level architecture seems to have a sense of flow to it. I, on the other hand, struggle to come up with where things have to go. Even if I come up with a relatively interesting location, I am not sure what's the best way to extend it further. I constantly face "writing blocks" where I'm just not sure what has to be beyond what I already have Specifically, I recognize how many of good Doom levels use height variation to constantly feed into the same room to make it interesting: lifts and stairs get the player to platforms from which just moments ago monsters were fighting at her, but now you see the room from a different angle, press buttons and unlock previously closed sections of the same room, etc. Although I recognize the concepts, I find it very difficult to implement it in a way that isn't boring I also find it difficult to create open spaces without fights turning into a mess. If there is a lot of space around, I end up having monsters from everywhere fire into the current location and move towards it. I am not sure how I should design monster placement in order for that to not consistently be a problem. Of course, I get the general idea that monsters should be hidden from view or introduced in a way that prevents it, but exactly how to consistently do it, I am not sure I also wonder whether there is good insight into how to populate a location with different monster types and not have them infighting. Many of the aforementioned modern maps manage to somehow separate monster groups, and the infighting is minimal. I am not entirely sure how to do that. Perhaps, assigning different heights to different monster groups is one method, and I do notice it in some Valiant maps. Curious, if there are more. I frequently run into "design awkwardness": suddenly the stuff I built is inconvenient for what I want to do, so I have to come up with awkward passages to get the player somewhere or some strangely looking lift or stairs. And somehow I find it very difficult to not get into that. I wonder if someone can relate to that, I am not sure I'm giving a good description of this phenomenon, but it just happens all the time A somewhat technical problem: I find it extremely difficult to conceive complex room shapes Everything that I end up designing is rectangles. I have no problem with adding lots of fun details, but the room shapes, stair shapes, all of this is hopelessly rectangular. The only time it works is if I literally take someone's map and copy an interesting room linedef by linedef. Maybe that's just the limitation of my brain, but I have always felt very limited in imagining spaces, and I wonder if anyone has advice for how to improve it. Okay, so this is it. I can definitely write more about it, but I think this is a good start. Really looking forward to everyone's comments on this! p.s.: I am not a very known mapper, so I see many answers assuming that I am a beginner. I am not. I have been making wads for the good part of 15 years. I have created dozens upon dozens of maps, most average, but a couple decent that were even somewhat liked on this very forum. I have experience creating tiny maps, average-sized maps, large maps. The reason why I wanted to point this out is that I'm looking for a bit more advanced advice, not "play more maps" or "start making smaller maps", because this advice is not helpful for me because I did do that. I am looking for deeper insight. Even if it's "make smaller maps", okay, but which kind?
  2. LouigiVerona

    The Theory of Modern Wads Design

    @baja blast rd. Thank you very much for your comment! I think the danger of analyzing maps on your own is that at some point you don't feel your analysis is good enough or even correct. There are so many ways to look at it. Also, my initial post _is_ analysis. And it's not nothing, but I reached out to the community because I wanted more help. So, I am absolutely not discarding the idea of continuing to analyze maps! 🙏 Another thing is that analysis is just a part of it. Another part of it is the methodology. Let's say that I generally understand how MAP26 works. But how do I build a map like this? Where do I start? What should I be thinking about? And this is where Catpho's links were super helpful (your comments are featured there too!) Some things that I got from it and already began to practice, with interesting results. 1. Layout-first design. A simple idea, I have actually ran into the same issue as many other mappers - I would get into detailing way too early and then either get stuck or just under-develop the main idea of the level. Now that I began to just super quickly create a level, it became way more fruitful. 2. Looping layouts by boris and your methodology of creating more interconnected maps Both ideas are closely linked, and when I tried doing it like that, I immediately began getting more interesting results. Things like getting a key and appearing in front of the door that needs it became automatic. So, this has been very helpful, and I will now be practicing and exploring this new-found knowledge! 👍
  3. LouigiVerona

    The Theory of Modern Wads Design

    I will definitely play that, btw! :D
  4. LouigiVerona

    The Theory of Modern Wads Design

    Hey everyone! This was really helpful! Everyone's advice was stellar, and I want to give special thanks to @Catpho, those links were exactly what I needed! A great collection. This needs to be documented somewhere!
  5. LouigiVerona

    The Theory of Modern Wads Design

    Folks, Thank you for the responses so far. I edited the post and will add this here, because I think I didn't provide enough background on myself. I am not a very known mapper, so I see many answers assuming that I am a beginner. I am not. I might not be good, but I am not a beginner. I have been making wads for the good part of 15 years. I have created dozens upon dozens of maps, most average, but a couple decent that were even somewhat liked on this very forum. I have experience creating tiny maps, average-sized maps, large maps. The reason why I wanted to point this out is that I'm looking for a bit more advanced advice, not "play more maps" or "start making smaller maps", because this advice is not helpful. I have done all that. I am looking for deeper insight. Even if it's "make smaller maps", okay, but which kind? The answer by @Fonze is much more what I'm looking for (and maybe this is what's going to be useful to other folks, lurking in the background).
  6. LouigiVerona

    Defaulting to Ultra Violence is terrible, and here's why

    I hard disagree on your summary of the post. It's actually a fairly well written post that asks questions. Yes, the OP has their own opinion, but they actually asked questions - and we're all responding to them. And note that in my several responses I am disagreeing with the OP. Yet, I find the discussion interesting. Having said that, I think whenever we try to convince people, we try to change how they think. It might be difficult, but not futile.
  7. LouigiVerona

    Defaulting to Ultra Violence is terrible, and here's why

    I would actually defend the OP here. I think it's a completely legitimate topic to bring up. A lot of us are not only gamers, but also mappers, and I think these discussions are both interesting and helpful.
  8. LouigiVerona

    Defaulting to Ultra Violence is terrible, and here's why

    Actually, it's a very good idea. Also, I wonder if someone truly missed out on a wad because of a difficulty. I played Valiant on the normal difficulty, but these days I handle it just fine on UV.
  9. LouigiVerona

    Defaulting to Ultra Violence is terrible, and here's why

    I actually disagree that this is a baseless assumption. It is based on how many mappers do in fact make it and on the fact that it's easier to work this way. If anything, your counter-argument is more baseless. You say that "many wads have nearly identical monster counts". The word "many" is very vague here. How much is many? And what percentage of maps is balanced this way? Then you say, "if HNTR" has two extra monsters on UV, you are missing out by not playin HNTR", implying that this is somehow ridiculous. But I would argue - yeah. If some mode has more content, you're missing out on it. And also that I don't think the situation you outline is frequent. Sounds like it almost never happens. And that the more likely scenario is that there are some extra monsters on UV. I started playing on UV precisely because of this: it feels like UV is the intended difficulty, and also with the most content. Whereas other skill levels are just watered down versions. If you say that this assumption is baseless, I would need some evidence that a significant amount of maps aren't like that.
  10. This! In fact, when I link people to my site, I tell them that it's one of those rare specimens of personal sites that only people from the 90s would have :D
  11. LouigiVerona

    Does anyone else wish the Doom Slayer was gender neutral?

    Totally agreed. Would love for there to be a Doomgal! And I am glad that there are now way more women in this community, too!
  12. LouigiVerona

    Did DOOM steal from Alone In The Dark 2??

    By the way, I watched the video multiple times at 2.39 and I cannot hear any Doom sound effects there. Maybe I'm just not hearing it, I don't know, but I obviously know Doom SFX very well and I cannot spot it.
  13. LouigiVerona

    The TF2 Community needs YOU!

    Yeah, makes sense. And, let's face it, TF2 is a really old game by this point. One thing they could do is release it as open source.
  14. LouigiVerona

    The TF2 Community needs YOU!

    I love TF2 and I sympathize with the petition, although I don't know how likely it is to change things. I have been playing TF2 for years and years, and it was some of the most fun time I had. Loved every bit of it... that is, until the game began to be overrun by bots. I am guessing that making bots because way too easy. I don't know if there is even a technical solution to this. There were many, and it's an arms race. Ultimately, you've got fairly simple inputs. I don't know how this can be fixed at all. Having said that, if they fixed it, I'd be back playing in no time!
  15. This right there is the summary of how I feel! Thank you, @GreenAnime
  16. LouigiVerona

    The Darkening Episode 2

    Writing a review for Darkening 2 is tough. It's a beloved megawad, and for good reason. As many other reviewers have said, it is historically a very important project. It was an important megawad for me personally. I fell in love with the first level in particular. The music, the realistic architecture, so reminiscent of the video games of the 90s... It all left a lasting impression. And it was one of the most beautiful wads I've seen at the time. But I rarely played anything beyond MAP01. So this time I decided to go through the whole megawad and answer the following question: has Darkening 2 stood the test of time? Obviously, you see what my rating is. So, in my opinion, the answer is "no". But why? Let's dive in. I'll start with the good. First, the new textures and level design in general are very good. Obviously, as the Doom mapping craft is evolving, there are far more impressive wads these days, but some things in Darkening 2 are timeless. Ola Bjorling's intro level is a classic. It creates such promise for the rest of the megawad, boasting both vast, mid and tiny areas, realistic objects (if that's your thing) and good gameplay. Exactly the kind of intro gameplay you would expect - not too intense, not too slow. The monster placement is solid, the progression is robust, some clever ideas scattered throughout the map, with many little side-tasks for the player, like the ending door which requires you to quickly hit the two switches. There are some annoying bits, like getting the yellow key requires one to swivel around a crate, but we'll get to that in a bit. MAP05 is amazing. I played it two or three times in a row. It's one of those things that might be personal, but I just connected with that map. Not only is the design cozy and varied, but the final boss area is so well designed! The blue armor secret is just exquisitely devious. A very memorable level! Totally playable from pistol start, btw, which is not necessarily true for every stage of this megawad. Even levels the gameplay of which I disliked, all had exemplary design. Everyone used the new textures to their full potential, and I liked the feel from the majority of contributions. The music seems to be a point of contention. I am actually quite puzzled by this. I didn't feel that the music is bad at all. In fact, the MAP01 music and MAP05 music could be some of my favorite tunes from all of Doom. The previous reviewer complains about MAP09's music. I just listened to it, it's a lovely electronic track. I think I know what he means by a piano, but on my system it sounds like this very quiet arpeggiating organ. Nothing annoying, all very soft and well written. I am currently playing it on GZDoom, and also on Linux, so my experience might be different, but I played it on Windows on vanilla Doom back in the day, and as far as I remember, the music sounded the same. So, not sure what's going on there. But that's where the good stuff ends. There might've been more points to discuss had there been new monsters and weapons, but those parts are stock. Now, for what felt bad and/or outdated, because I suspect that in 2000 this wad offered acceptable gameplay. I played Darkening 2 on UV difficulty. And this could have been my first mistake. The balance on UV is generally very poor. MAP01 is fine, but as I said, it's not that intense to begin with. But starting MAP02, the only level that managed UV well was only the aforementioned MAP05. Yes, literally a single level. The problem is the low amounts of ammo and health. Especially health. On some levels medikits are so sparse that I was on less than 20% health throughout most of the run. It's a pervasive problem, especially given that there are a lot of traps, liquid floors and lifts from which you could easily fall onto said liquid. And thing is, some of those could have been interesting little romps, but because of the medikit scarcity I had to nervously save before entering a new area. The second problem, somehow more annoying to me, is that Darkening 2 demands loads of platforming. With all due respect and love that I have for Ola's MAP01, getting that yellow key was a huge pain for me when I first played it. These days I get it almost always on the first try, but back in the day I remember spending ten, twenty attempts trying to swivel around that crate in order to get to it. I even wondered, am I missing something? Is there a teleporter somewhere? note: actually, you can get the key if you simply accelerate and jump from the opposing ledge. I think I remember trying it as a kid and not being able to get it, and I guess I assumed it was impossible. Maybe I didn't accelerate enough. For some reason I easily get it now. Either way, I don't think that it's a great idea to make the player work so much for a key that's necessary to progress. Just allow me to take it without having to spend years figuring out the best way to pick it up! I do understand platforming as an additional effort to get to a bonus. I don't want it as part of the main gameplay. Doom is not Mario. And the game's physics, controls and camera are not designed for precision jumps and acrobatic tricks. It's tedious and frustrating, and too often in Darkening 2 you need to run across a thin ledge or swivel around something. And that's just so unnecessary. Maybe it was normal in 2000. There is also an over-reliance on switches. You've got a door right in front of you or a lift, but no, go press a switch first. One level in particular, MAP10, is especially bad at this. Almost every lift requires you to hit a switch and then run through a room and a couple of corridors to get to it. Why? Especially given how you then have to backtrack there several times and go through the same exercise over and over again. Speaking of backtracking, boy, there's lots of it! In recent years the overall quality of level design has risen considerably. It's been a while since I was seriously stuck. In Darkening 2 this happened all the time. I constantly found myself not knowing where to go next. You grab a key and then run around, trying to painfully remember which door required it and where is it. For some unclear reason, most doors are not color coded. A silver door requires a red key, a brown door requires a red key, and then some other door requires a blue key, only that door IS color coded. Why the inconsistency? There is another thing to note about doors. Many levels exhibit an inordinate amount of fake doors. Perhaps, this is the realism angle that this megawad exhibits, but again and again you'll see a door, it won't open and is not supposed to be opened, and then a door that looks exactly like it will. And, of course, when you find a key, it usually won't be near the door that actually needs it. In many modern levels you get the key, jump off the ledge - and voila, you're in front of the relevant door. All of this makes you get stuck a lot, especially on later levels which are larger. Unlike the promising MAP01, with its opening vista of the mysterious base, all other levels are cramped beyond belief. It's as if it was a competition on how to use less space. You get to MAP02 and see these tiny corridors. Well, that will be the rule throughout the whole wad. That's what most levels will look like, with very rare larger areas, many of which are still going to be mostly blocked off to the player by railings or filled with liquids. And within these tiny areas you'd have to fight off monsters. The monster placement would've been satisfactory had it not been for those tiny rooms and corridors. Again and again you get a baron or a cacodemon right in your face, and there's nowhere to go. You are also constantly low on ammo, so it pays off to pace your supplies, making it plain boring to shoot down barons and cacos with merely a shotgun or a chaingun, while having to strafe around them in narrow spaces. I have also forgotten how annoying lost souls could be, as I'm not seeing them as much in modern wads, but to be fair, in some levels they are used well, like in MAP05, where they notice you from afar and then come charging through the windows. There is an underwhelming cyberdemon fight in MAP011, which is kind of baffling. It's not at all challenging, the area is again small, but you can run away into another room and come back at will. I was bored taking out the cyberdemon with my shotgun (cause the rest of the ammo was gone by this point), so I just ran past it into the exit. The last level, MAP12, is probably one of the most disappointing levels I've ever played in my life. It might sound like an exaggeration, but notice I am not saying it's my worst - instead, it's my most disappointing. And it's disappointing because it's so beautifully made and is again designed by Ola Bjorling. I should've loved this level, which is meant to be the closing level to the saga. But it's really-really bad. It's like MAP12 takes all the problems of the previous levels and dials them up to eleven. First, the level is poorly designed for pistol start. It took me many-many tries to get through the first encounters relatively unscathed, given my understanding that medikits are going to be few and far between. The very first room you're deposited in is a tiny room with two imps and with a cacodemon shooting through the window, while you have nothing but a gun. And the only way through this room is to shoot a switch, making it impossible to do it without basically getting killed in the first several seconds. So you have to dance around and try to tediously shoot down the imps with your puny gun, while avoiding their projectiles and the cacodemon in the back. And when you finally get through this, with your almost depleted gun, the very next narrow corridor features a baron. Of course. You do get a shotgun and a chaingun fairly quickly, but whether you get a super shotgun quickly will depend on how you go about the map. You can get it quickly, or you can get it midway into the level. The placement of that super shotgun is very bad, in my opinion. The second big problem is that the level chooses to make you navigate it through liquid floors: the stage consists of several areas which are mostly connected through nukage tunnels. So, you are given a bunch of radiation suits. This adds literally nothing to the gameplay. If anything, it actually subtracts from it, and subtracts substantially, because first you use up your suits to navigate the level back and forth to even understand where you need to go. By the time you more or less figure out where's what, all your suits are gone. And given how low you are on health, you're basically forced to restart. Which means that there is no chance to beat MAP12 on your first try, it's just impossible due to how convoluted everything is. At some point I gave up and entered the level with a nomonsters flag and iddqd, so that I could map out where everything was. And I have to tell you, I spent no less than twenty minutes finding all the keys and the exit. Think about it - twenty minutes on nomonsters and iddqd, and it still took me forever to find my way around. There was obviously no or inconsistent color coding of the doors, and many of them were far from where you got the key. In fact, between you and the door stood passages with nukage, so you would have to grab a radiation suit first. One of the most frustrating things about this level is getting the blue key. If I complained about getting the yellow key on MAP01, this blows it completely out of the water. The key is in a room full of crates. And the amount of platforming you need to do is beyond reasonable. Ola positioned those crates at nearly impossible angles, forcing you to attempt it again and again and again. One bit is so difficult that even after playing through the level three times, I still cannot get it reliably. I counted that the average amount of attempts to get through that spot alone was over ten. And I am a pretty experienced Doom player. I dislike platforming, but I can do it. MAP12 challenges that notion. Another problem with that specific part is that the crate with the blue key serves two purposes: it gets you the key, but it also let's you jump into the next area. And that's the ONLY way to get there. And if you would need to backtrack - and in a moment I'll explain that you might need to - you would have to go through all that horrible platforming AGAIN. There is no shortcut. If previous levels put you in cramped spaces, MAP12 decides to turn it into torture. You are constantly in tight quarters, fighting barons, cacodemons and hell knights. Once you go into that area from the blue key crate, you have to walk along a narrow ledge which oversees nukage you've traversed previously, and there's the opposite ledge which you can theoretically jump onto, but that would place you in the previous area of the map. As you pass through that ledge, to the side large sections open up, releasing six cacodemons right behind you. You turn through a narrow staircase - and bump into a baron. The staircase is too narrow for you to go around him, so it's either a health tax, shooting at him and powering through, or else you go back. Your retreat is blocked by a crowd of cacodemons, so if you want to spare your health, your only bet is to jump down to that opposite ledge and kill all the cacos. And then you have to go back and go through those crates again, spending fifteen, twenty tries to get through. Knowing all this, the most optimal solution is to walk through that ledge carefully, and as soon as cacos are released, run back. It's a beginner's trap, just like so many things on this map. But these traps have only just begun. The march towards the end is a series of these traps, so the best advice is to save every single step. Immediately after this ordeal you get into a room with yet more crates. This time the platforming is easy, but as you jump off into a tiny-tiny corner, you see a baron right in front of you. AGAIN. There is no way to kill him without dying or losing most of your health. The trick that I found is to platform your way onto another crate and wake the baron up from there, then kill it from a distance. And, by the way, not only does taking out these barons and cacos takes time, it depletes most of your carefully saved ammo. I was finally in a good place at that stage, but these three encounters foced me to enter the final several rooms with barely anything, but cells. As you enter the final areas, you see an invisibility power up. Don't take it! It's another beginner's trap, designed for you to lose even more health: there will be no more hitscan enemies, instead only revenants and barons, and using invisibility with barons is a bad idea. The final battle is bizarre. By this time you get the BFG (through that room with the crates and the baron). You then get stuck with a cyberdemon on a relatively tight ledge (yes, again, large monster, little space), but it's wide enough that you can navigate around him, grab some ammo and use the lift to get to the final area, where for the first time since MAP01 you again get a relatively large area. The battle is trivial, you just run around, shoot you BFG and the monsters kill each other. There is the Spider Mastermind which you won't even notice, cause it's surrounded by Arachnotrons who quickly kill it. The cyberdemon is stuck on that ledge. It cannot shoot you from there, so you just kill it either with the leftovers of the BFG or rockets from the outside. It's tedious. I don't understand the reasoning behind that. Why put a cyberdemon there? Unless the expectation was that the player kills them on that narrow ledge? And then comes the very final area. You drop into a cave. Deeper and deeper you go, through a claustrophobic passage. At one point I thought it was a dead end, but you can actually squeeze yourself into a corner and drop further down. Then there's a panel with the Darkening logo. You open it and a tiny room full of imps greets you. Imps fire multiple projectiles at you, but you are stuck, there's nowhere to run, so you have to kill them before they kill you. The obvious thing, of course, is to use the BFG, but the problem is that in that claustrophobic cave had to be a specter, of course. So, you are very likely to enter that final room with a shotgun. Again, it's trap after trap after trap. As you enter the room, an archvile is lowered and more imps will come out. The room is tiny and the only way to hide from the archvile is to have the bars that surround it stand between you. One small mistake - and you're likely dead, because you lost so much taking hits from the imps. If you get lucky, you'll kill it, and you're done. So, it's tiny spaces with lots of monsters till the very end. Now, obviously, when you know all that, the level is not that hard. In fact, after mostly writing up this review, I went back and beat the level in exactly thirty minutes, with 100%+ health. But that was after studying this map for hours. And yes, I still got stuck on the platforming bit, I still had to backtrack, and the second time around I just jumped it over, because jumping is not blocked. In conclusion. Darkening 2 is definitely staying on my computer forever. It's got sentimental value for me. But it's not the wad I'm likely to replay much. MAP01 and MAP05 are great, and I've got this morbid love for MAP12, having had to dissect it for so long, but the rest is forgettable. It's an important era of Doom mapping, and a huge step up aesthetically from previous megawads. It also has character. The gameplay, for what it's worth, is done in a similar vein. It feels like a megawad. But it's also vastly outdated, and its gameplay and even functional level design is no longer on par. It's absolutely fine if you enjoy it anyway, I know I do. But if you are completely new to this, do enter the dungeons with open eyes.
  17. @fruity lerlups Totally fine with saves! And I see some other notable Doom players use saves and it's fine, like decino.
  18. Folks! I would like to make this post just to say a heartfelt thanks. A lot of work goes into maintaining the forum. Loads of work goes into Cacowards. I always get the feeling from this place that it is a vibrant community that does a lot of really good work - both the mappers and community leaders/organizers. Thank you everyone! Seeing the Cacowards and reading it is awesome and just pulls everyone so much closer to each other <3
  19. Folks, I am attaching a map that was generated by Oblige. I have been using Oblige for years and have never encountered a situation like this. The map in question is MAP04. I am playing it with GZDoom. In the map, the monsters are on a ledge and cannot enter the room - a completely normal situation. When the player triggers the switch, the floor turns into stairs. However, a surprising thing happens: while the player can move up and down the stairs normally, monsters get stuck at step 3 or so. They do see the player and shoot at him, but seemed to be blocked from walking further. At the same time, Cacodemons can pass through the passage normally. I have looked at this passage in the editor, and nothing looks suspicious. I even tried changing some things, like increasing the height of the passage, although it's fine as it is. Nothing resolved the situation. I am curious what's happening in this map. savage_encounter_MAP04.zip
  20. LouigiVerona

    Monsters are being blocked for a mysterious reason

    Got ya! Thank you very much!
  21. LouigiVerona

    Monsters are being blocked for a mysterious reason

    Well, each subsequent step sector is raised by 1 pixel as well. I am not sure it explains this. The player can move around the stairs with no problems. Why would it be a problem for the monster? Also, they get blocked way before the blue floor. I appreciate you spending time on this, but I think you should actually load up the level and see it in action. It's quite bizarre and they get stuck, to simplify, in the middle of the stairs. And I don't see there being any big jumps between individual steps. It all looks quite uniform.
  22. LouigiVerona

    Monsters are being blocked for a mysterious reason

    It's probably sector 995, maybe 996. But anyway, it's these stairs. Stairs being narrow doesn't explain the problem at hand. If they were too narrow, then monsters wouldn't be able to traverse them, yet, they do until they get blocked at almost the very end. And no such problem exists anywhere else on the map.
  23. LouigiVerona

    What's your general play style in Doom?

    I am generally a fan of being really careful. I try to prepare before entering a room and shoot as many monsters down as I can from afar or through windows. I enjoy exploring the space and searching for secrets. I might usually spend an inordinate amount of time searching for secrets on a level. To the point that I might be coming back to an interesting level weeks or months later and searching for secrets. I have failed with AUGER;ZENITH, MAP03. I found all secrets but one: there's a megasphere seen behind impassable glass. I spent hours and hours and hours running around the level and finding ways to get it. Eventually, I somehow got the secret door to unlock. No matter how much I tried, however, I couldn't reproduce it. Eventually, I opened the was file in the editor and looked it up. The result did not make me feel bad, because I realized that there was no way I could've ever found it. Same thing with AUGER;ZENITH, MAP07. It turned out it was the same principle. Again, I would've never found it, and I might've spent a collective 2+ hours just searching for this last secret before opening it in the editor. But sometimes it pays off. I spent the same amount of time searching for all the secrets in AUGER;ZENITH, MAP17 and eventually found all the secrets. It was epic. Btw, this map is one of my favorite maps of all time, such an incredible space! Having said that, I do enjoy maps where the strategy is to just run around in circles. So, it's not always just about being a sniper. p.s.: I chronically forget to save :D
  24. To me the key word here is "memorable". Not all memorable maps are necessarily good in other respects. I sometimes come back to maps that are maybe not so great in hindsight, but which were an important building block for me as a player. And there many such maps for me that I don't think I would necessarily would want to add to any top 100 lists.
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