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geo

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About geo

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    didn't know being a forum staple was a bad thing

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  1. I'm currently house sitting for someone with 2 cats. I was told to give the cats milk + water + food and well fish with the cats. Cats love to fish. Long story short, I fixed a refrigerator handle with an inanimate carbon rod. Now here's the story of how I did it.

    The first day, the milk was spoiled. So I bought new milk. The refrigerator is old, maybe 60 years old. It has a handle with a hinge on the bottom. The handle works like a lever. You pull the top of the lever handle and the hinge opens the door. Without pulling this lever handle, there's no way to open up the door, its locked and sealed.

    The problem here is when you open it, the lever stays 'pulled' and won't go up again to its starting position to latch and lock again. I didn't think this was a problem. It was closed. Yep closed like a normal refrigerator even if the lever wasn't in its upright position. No these aren't sexual innuendos.

    Day after day, I fed the cats. Now today, 2 or 3 days after buying a full gallon of milk, it is starting to spoil. Swirls in the milk. Well what the fuck? Then when I close the door I notice, the door is closed, but not sealed. Not latched, not firmly shut. The door wiggles. That clearly must be why my milk spoiled so quickly, the cold air is escaping.

    I dismantled the handle from the hinge at the bottom of the lever. You pull a metal pin out and the handle lever comes completely out. That's when I found the mechanism that pushes the handle into its upright position. Some small metal piston and its 'cradle' or 'housing' had cracked, and split. So every time the piston goes up and forward, it was really going up and left. So the piston head was getting stuck and couldn't go up.

    The piston had a lot of pressure going left, and I managed to bend a butter knife trying to get the piston to go forward again. In the end, it was a spoon that pulled it away from the left. Piston still worked, so I assembled the handle again. The handle was at its upright position... until I opened the door again. It did the same thing.

    After dismantling the handle again, turns out the piston head going left instead of forward has damaged the handle so badly that it just always goes left. It had ground away metal and made itself a new home on the left instead of 'forward.' Then I saw that the pin everything hinges on had had been grinding the metal away so without noticing every time you pull the handle lever, it went slightly to the right, grinding away the metal over decades.

    To top that off, on one side of the cradle that holds the pin hinge to the refrigerator had cracked straight through. Somehow metal had cracked apart. Well its 60 years old, but I just don't expect metal to crack. Eventually it will crack more to the point it won't be able to hold in the pin and the door will be locked forever. Unless duct tape will fix it.

    The way I got the piston to go forward instead of left was by finding a small inch long inanimate carbon rod that I put into the housing on the left of the piston, preventing it from going left. It can only go forward.

    The inanimate carbon rod saved the day. When I told the home owner about the door handle fix, she was very thankful, it had been that way for 2 years and she's owned the fridge for 40 years. She told me the milk never lasted more than 4 or 5 days. Anything less than a gallon would spoil in 3 days.

    When I bought yet another gallon of milk, that's when I decided to check the temperature. Well, I know why the refrigerator spoils milk so easily. Its either been set to off or the closest setting to off there is. I can only imagine how many years if not decades this refridgerator has been set to off.

    1. Show previous comments  5 more
    2. Quasar

      Quasar

      geo said:

      I can only imagine how many years if not decades this refridgerator has been set to off.

      And now having been turned on for the first time in God knows when, probably empty of any resemblence of refrigerant and with degraded lubricants, seals, and locked up components, it probably has a few weeks to months of life if even that much.

      I like your fix but really, the lady needs a new refrigerator :P

    3. geo

      geo

      Quasar said:

      And now having been turned on for the first time in God knows when, probably empty of any resemblence of refrigerant and with degraded lubricants, seals, and locked up components, it probably has a few weeks to months of life if even that much.

      I like your fix but really, the lady needs a new refrigerator :P


      LOL I never even thought of the refrigerant issue, but it works. Yes she needs a new refrigerator, but its not my fridge.

    4. KiiiYiiiKiiiA

      KiiiYiiiKiiiA

      geo said:


      Actual photographic evidence for the existence of rod.

      I am impressed.

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