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geo

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    didn't know being a forum staple was a bad thing

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  1. I met someone's entire family this weekend. I've never met this entire family, but I felt like I've met them before. Clearly, I have never met any of them, they live 6 hours away and have never been in my state.

    The feeling wasn't dejavu. It was just a feeling like I've met them.

    Earlier that afternoon, I watched an X-Files episode where Fox was stuck in the same day. Forced to relive the same day over and over. Eventually strangers became familiar to him.

    I have an incredible memory. In fact, I wish I could forget things. So I came up with the idea that I've already met them before, because I either relived that day over and over without realizing it, or I relive the same life over and over when I die.

    My friend that died once said it didn't work like that for her. When she was dead, she was dead. No restart. However, when she died, she wasn't burried, therefore it didn't end. She also said there were no bright lights. She didn't know she died until she was told she died.

    1. Show previous comments  52 more
    2. SYS

      SYS

      AndrewB said:

      Not true. All you have to do is play russian roulette where you load 5 of the 6 chambers, spin the thingy, point it at your head and pull the trigger. Repeat this 10 times. If you're still alive and well at this point (and you would be according to the theory),

      An unverifiable theory beyond the realm of personal experience.

      AndrewB said:
      this proves beyond any reasonable doubt that quantum immortality is real. Remember, while you'll have about 60 million dead versions of you for every living version, it doesn't matter according to the theory. The idea is that your consciousness can only persist in a branch in the multiverse where you will continue to be alive indefinitely. You're far more likely to be alive in the 1 branch where you miss the loaded chambers than the 5 branches where you don't.

      Sidenote: I think the theory actually calls for using some quantum mechanism such as the one described in Schrodinger's Cat to be the randomness generator. I'm undecided about whether this is even necessary. Immortality is immortality, regardless of the methods used.
      [/B]

      In essence this theorem would make suicide an act of quantum futility. Like the movie groundhog day only the day wouldn't be in continuous reset.

      How does dying without committing suicide apply to the theory? Or can it? Like you reach the ripe age of 95 and keel over on the toilet. For every 60 million branches where you keel over on the toilet do you finally reach one where you're able to complete the bowel movement and live perpetually throughout the Aeon?

    3. AndrewB

      AndrewB

      POTGIESSER said:

      An unverifiable theory beyond the realm of personal experience.

      If you mean "you can prove the theory to yourself but not anyone else" then you're right.

      In essence this theorem would make suicide an act of quantum futility. Like the movie groundhog day only the day wouldn't be in continuous reset.

      This is true.

      How does dying without committing suicide apply to the theory? Or can it? Like you reach the ripe age of 95 and keel over on the toilet. For every 60 million branches where you keel over on the toilet do you finally reach one where you're able to complete the bowel movement and live perpetually throughout the Aeon?

      These are good questions. The answers within the bounds of the quantum immortality theory aren't really clear. We know that our planet will eventually be incinerated by the sun, and we know that the universe will eventually become too sparse to sustain matter. No matter means no brainpower which means no consciousness. It's safe to assume that there's no way to avoid our eventual physical destruction on this universal plane.

      One might speculate that even when our environment is obliterated beyond all purpose, there still remains the infinitesimally small chance that our vital organs/facilities dodge all destruction around us due to quantum randomness, and continue to operate just well enough to keep our consciousness going. This has led to the speculation that quantum immortality implies an eternity of pain and torment, sort of like a real-life hell on earth. However, there's a problem with this theory. If our body and mind can be so utterly eviscerated and ravaged that our consciousness persists just as long as we have some sentience, it stands to reason that our cranial capacity can be reduced to such a primitive level that a trillion years passes in what seems like a fraction of a second. If the universe effectively ends at this point, then really, this so-called immortality is basically indistinguishable from death itself and the theory fails. Quantum immortality has absolutely no reason to ensure that your death is as delayed as long as possible. It can only imply that your death will never happen. For this to be true, we have to completely change our assumptions.

      This leaves us with the possibility that, assuming we're self-aware, it's not that we can't die due to a magic force blocking our suicidal path, it's more of a matter that we simply won't die due to our life circumstances. In the case of the suicide experiment, it may simply be that a conscious observer will never even attempt suicide to begin with. It may be that a conscious observer will live his life, seemingly dodging perils at every turn, on a path destined to lead him to a circular path of continued life. A circular path, I say? How is that possible when we've already mapped out the future of the universe as being linear and destined for destruction? Well, let's not forget that Einstein theorized time-travel to be a completely plausible concept, a claim that continues to be supported by science to this day. Let's also remember that we're living in an era exploding with amazing scientific discoveries and revolutionary technology. It's not really that far fetched to think that some time in the next number of decades, we'll have the opportunity to send ourselves back in time. Time travel doesn't really seem that plausible right now, but the same could be said about many technologies several decades before they came into existence. This concept may also help explain why we're so lucky to be human and to live in by far the wealthiest and most advanced era in human history. It may simply be that we're probabilistically predisposed to be a conscious observer in the body of someone who is very fortunate and very well-off, and this may simply be the case for all conscious observers in all universes. It's a pretty nice concept when you think about it, and it doesn't seem to contradict any laws of physics or probability.

      I should write a book about this stuff.

    4. SYS

      SYS

      I read it over and over again, and it's a mindfuck of a concept/post. Almost a little too esoteric sounding I dare say, while being completely devoid of it paradoxically.

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