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Morris

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Everything posted by Morris

  1. Morris

    I know who the first Vampire is!

    All fair enough. Admittedly, I did disregard the intent of the hostility behind the word "savage" in my perspective. It doesn't seem as though you did, but just in case you think I was attacking you, I put "yell at" in quotes simply because it is figurative speech. I prefer a "coach" over censorship. Not only does it further conversation as you said, but it pushes the poster to truly question and re-evaluate not only what they had said, but the angle and perspective from which they were saying it. That is something I'm personally fond of, especially when I'm the one having to do it. I really don't mean for some of my posts to come off as hostile, bitter, or over-critical (none of which I am in real life), but I can see why they do. I can only conclude that it's a matter of posting without putting much thought into who might read it or the real person behind a screenname, something I'll make a point to keep in mind from now on. For me, at least, that is one of the fun parts of history, theology, and storytelling. I like comparing traits and personas to other things in fact, myth, and intended fiction. On the contrary, I'm aware it all adds up to being mostly senseless rabble, but it's a rabble that I delight in.
  2. Morris

    I know who the first Vampire is!

    Actually, that was in reply to which wouldn't be the first time he's brought up Native Americans and the evil European settlers in a thread. In this thread at least, it was pointless for him to bring up, especially before finding his story, which he did. I don't feel I was anti-racial in any way, seeing as I grew up next to an Indian reservation and have no qualms with them at all, and for that reason, the time of Western colonization happens to be one of my favorite areas of American history. I like correcting things I've come to learn as misguided or plain out wrong, especially when it's something I've studied extensively from the different sides. Perhaps "get over it" might have been over the edge in this context, and with no need to continue that thought in this thread. My fault and sorry if I offended you or anyone else. This isn't the first time you've "yelled" at me. I'm new here, and used to forums where challenging and heated debate are provoked. I realize this isn't the place for that, but old habits die hard. I'll work harder on leaving my old habits behind. I'm sure most of us understand that there is no real "first vampire", and that the stereotype is built upon the various "boogiemen" of world cultures. Saying that we're embarassing for evaluating literary characters, of any background, is ridiculous to me, but to each his own. The more frequent stereotype falls under a more Hebrew/Christian style of evil, and an article I read a while ago brought up the whole Cain thing and more lineage linked to Hebrew texts. That's simply all I was suggesting. I'm sure it's not something anyone here obsesses about, and appears to be held mostly on a side-thought level.
  3. Morris

    I know who the first Vampire is!

    You're aware that Native American myths and magic have as much credibility as any other culture's religion and mythology? Strange, last time I checked, but all the history I've read made a point of portraying both the Indians and the settlers as cruel to each other. The Native Americans were savages, wether by reason or not, they were. Though not all tribes can be held accountable, a good amount of them invaded and slaughtered settler towns that they were supposedly peaceful with. They murdered trade caravans and travellers from town to town. They didn't like us on their land, and they made it known. They initiated a lot of the battles that were fought. They broke as many, if not more, treaties as we did. Because we won in the end, we're made to look like the heartless savages that stole their land. Which we did. We cheated, broke treaties, and launched sneak attacks for territorial reasons. It's f-ed up, but that's conquest and civilization. Get over it. edit: As far as I know, the common idea of what a vampire is originated from Hebrew texts, Cain being their diety (I know it's not the proper word to use, because in their eyes there is only one god, but I don't know what other word I would use), though he may not be portrayed as one himself in the Bible. As for the Cain part, it was years ago when I looked into all this though, and I'm sure most of my sources weren't all that valid. But it only makes sense that the demonic vampire came from Hebrew scripture, as Hebrews were (AFAIK) among the first to place blatant "evil" in such personal forms. This could be due to other religions that they had to face DID indeed involve blood sacrifices and the such, but none are proven to reach the exagerrated extent they're spoken of by Hebrew and Hebrew based faiths.
  4. Morris

    Best Movie 2005

    Ha, I had forgotten about that! Come to think of it, he was the most developed and personal human character in the movie.
  5. Morris

    Best Movie 2005

    "S - K - U - L - L Island". I couldn't help but laugh at that. And while on the most worthless character of the movie (the sailor boy), the whole reference to "Heart Of Darkness" was completely senseless, and a waste of about 15 minutes right there. Also, I love it when characters are built up for no reason. He didn't die, he didn't do anything special. He just used up screen time. We never find out where he goes after the Skull Island incident. I'm glad Jackson accomplished NOTHING with a character he made sure to be careful about giving a background. That's ace script writing right there. I'd like to see him do that. Most of them were at nonsensical times, which leads me to believe Peter Jackson is trying to score "artsy" points, and failing at it. And I'd like to know why he thought Jack Black fit to be anywhere in the movie. He's a terrible actor, especially for a role like that. It does really bother me, Jackson's casting has always been PERFECT in all of his movies. And yes, seeing Jack Black trying to pull off that role is probably the main reason I disliked the other acts. I didn't hate the movie, I was just very disappointed and expected a lot more. This was supposed to be a mammoth remake of a legendary film. That's how it was hyped, advertised, and raved. Peter Jackson always delivers what is promised, except (in my opinion) for Kong. And after the Skull Island part, the trademark NYC part was just like "whatever".
  6. Morris

    Best Movie 2005

    Well, I do LOVE b-movies, especially when they involve ludicrous action scenes. edit: Especially when those b-movies are giant animals pwning the hell out of each other. And yet another edit because my thinking is slow at the moment: The original King Kong did have the natives and a T-Rex, and I guess Peter Jackson must've thought Skull Island was the chance to shine the movie. My main complaint is that, at least to someone who likes movies that are overdone for the humour of being overdone, the middle shouldn't be the best part of a 3 hour movie, which it was for me. I also forgot, if Undead was 2005, then that's another movie on my list.
  7. Morris

    "LOL" Doom Moments

    This may be the most pointless post in this thread (then again, maybe not), but I find myself LMAO in almost every game I play on ST. Or, in SP, there's countless LOLs abound in any noob wad. edit: And as far as Doom and dancing goes, http://doomdance.ytmnd.com
  8. Morris

    New Years Resolutions

    Doing pretty well actually. Lost 20 pounds, quit smoking, all the money I used to use on alcohol and drugs is being saved up so I can go to college, stopped being half-assed at work, got my liscense reactivated, starting to pay off all my fines, learning how to program in C++, strength training regularly, taking guitar a lot more "seriously", finally got a recording studio set up in my room (albeit cheap), becoming much more social and now have a few ladies who I'm keeping an eye on for a possible serious relationship. Now all I have to do is move out, start taking kung fu, stop masturbating 3 times a day, become a porn star, become a model photographer, and actually start writing as much as I pretend to. And shit, I had a lot of resolutions, which I am actually doing a good job at fulfilling. What's happening to me?
  9. Morris

    Best Movie 2005

    Sin City, Land of the Dead, Grizzly Man, and I'm sure there's another that I'm forgetting. I agree with whoever said Doom was more enjoyable than Sith. Doom's plot at least made sense and didn't contradict itself, even if it wasn't what we all wanted from it. Narnia was so-so. It was amazing to look at, but I didn't find it all that entertaining except for the final battle sequence, in which they used the classic generic fantasy cop-out routine more than once. But I guess that's how the book is written. edit: As fantasy is, more or less, the only fiction I can stand to read regularly, any magic item that has failless properties that aids the protogonist without consequence, especially when NOTHING is done to obtain it, completely ruins any story for me. I'm impartial about King Kong. I'll admit the Skull Island part is some of the best film I've ever seen, but the other 2 hours make it almost not worth seeing. And Jack Black is possibly the worst choice for that role. WTF Peter Jackson? Could have just as easily been 2 hours, and much better for it.
  10. Morris

    DOOM movie DVD pre-order

    With rare exceptions, the only kind of movies I can stand to watch are b-action and b-horror films. Despite the big budget, the Doom movie was a mix of both. Therefore, I enjoyed the movie. However, the BIG problem with me was the usage of the Doom liscense. As Mordeth said, it really isn't too hard a plot to follow. I think it's pretty much decided, even among people who aren't Doom players, that hellspawn parody owns biogenetic mutations. And why are biogenetic mutations so damn popular, anyway? So much wasted potential. But still, I thought the movie was fun at worst, and not worth seeing on anything less than a big screen. Nothing too memorable, but I don't regret seeing it or spending 7.50 to do so. Of course I'm not going to buy it.
  11. Morris

    Doom tattoos

    Honestly, I found it more humorous that he compared something in "real life" to something in a script written by George Lucas. edit: and one of Shakespear's more melodramatic works.
  12. Morris

    Doom tattoos

    For the last line, if you had said "...Combining this philosophy with the word 'Satanism'...", you would have been right on the dot. I think it's funny that people still think that the Christian version of Satanism really exists. In latin, "Satan" translates directly to "the adversary". Thus, why they are named as such. The notion that Satanists are homicidal, murderous, immoral, or evil is ridiculous. Some Satanic artists play off this stereotype as a self-parody, but the truth is that the Satanic philosophy embraces truth, honor, chivalry, and perfectionism. Anyhow, back on topic. I don't think I'd ever get a tattoo from a video game. Then again, the "you'll regret it" line is generally BS, unless you really do get something stupid. A tattoo represents something to you, and even if your ideals or lifestyle changes 10 years down the road, it still represents something that was once a part of you. I have several, and they all represent something deep to me. I usually get them when I make a great accomplishment or major change in my life. One of them (an over-detailed evil looking dragon)isn't really my style anymore, but I still love the tattoo because it represents my triumph over some really bad things that were going on in my life. It stands as a badge and a reminder to myself about what I've done, as do all my other ones. I just can't see a videogame tattoo having that kind of power, and thus, to me is pointless. However, GoatLord, since you do seem to have some meaning to yours, go for it. But as it is a strong and general image by today's standards, just make sure it isn't something you might change your mind about 20 years from now.
  13. Morris

    Heavy Metal Suggestions

    For some reason, I was never really able to catch on to Cannibal Corpse. Then again, all I've heard from them I heard from friends, I never really listened to them on my own. Asphyx, older Amorphis, and Luciferion are pretty much my favorite death bands. Anyone here listen to Dragonforce? I really thought their other albums were a little overrated, but I have to admit that their album "Inhuman Rampage", which came out yesterday, is pretty awesome. I would not hesitate to recommend it first to someone getting into power metal. Also got another album earlier today by a band called Orion Riders, makes me think of a heavier Angra. Pretty good stuff for a virtually unheard of band.
  14. Morris

    Heavy Metal Suggestions

    Metal has a pretty large spectrum, and I'm sure most people involved could sit here and list underground/unsigned metal bands that kick ass, but noone else has ever heard of. You can go wrong with any suggestor, and someone else's suggestion might unexpectedly suprise you. Different people have different tastes, and a wider variety of suggestions is rarely unwelcome.
  15. Morris

    Heavy Metal Suggestions

    Perhaps there was no reason for me to go into details, but still, I don't renounce it. I don't feel a strong contempt towards the genre, but they have a big scene here, and since I'm heavily involved with local music, I deal with them a lot. I'm friends with some of them, but most of them do get on my nerves for various reasons, everytime I see them. So that should explain my contempt. That aside, I'm sick of being the only one to defend Manowar, and that there's even a need to still defending them, but someone's got to do it. They aren't even close to my favorite band, FFS, and when I added that at the end of my post I was playing off the self-parody. Throughout their 25 or so years of existance, they've only changed labels to get away from becoming heavily commercialized, not to chase it. They're optimistic and have pride in themselves, and even though they admittedly over do it from time to time, I don't see what's wrong with it. Saying they "took it" from KISS is unfair, because other bands before and after KISS have made a point of say "Hey, our music IS pretty fucking good." And, their music is just a solid and strong as it was on their debut. They're recognized by Guiness (sp?) for being the loudest band ever, and are recognized by almost every metal band (from all genres) as an influence, and also for "keeping it true" for two and half decades. They still aren't dicks like every other successful metal artist, and it's obvious it's all in fun, and they still manage to pull off the universal "metal message" while having it. That's a good deal, even if it wasn't self-parody, to be proud about, and I don't see anything wrong with announcing your pride to the world. And as for the Motley Crue thing, "OMG THEY WON A FIGHT SO THEY'RE BETTER AND NOT LOSERS#@1!!!!!" Seriously, I love Crue as well, but look at them. A bunch of alcoholic losers who can't keep a wife or stay out of jail. Wow, cool. And as you said, it's hearsay. I prefer an image of deserved pride over "Look at us, we're cool." But it's all speculative, and it's the music that matters. In which case, Manowar wins. ;)
  16. Morris

    Heavy Metal Suggestions

    First off, this is a forum. I can state my opinion as long as I'm not personally attacking anyone, which I don't think I did. Second off, "crust" is not recognized as a genre even related to metal, it's recognized as an offshoot of punk and hardcore. He suggested it, I think it's a bad suggestion for someone trying to get into heavy metal, so I suggest against it and gave my opinion to form a basis why I suggest against it. And then I continued to make a suggestion for Helstar, which reminds me a little bit of Crass, who is generally known as the founder of "crust" punk, but Helstar is a band your average metalhead could probably get into. edit: "Deride"? The only thing I said about it that isn't fact is that it's "shitty". That's opinion. Everything else are definitive points of the "crust" genre.
  17. Morris

    Heavy Metal Suggestions

    Don't tell me "crust" metal as in "crust" punk. As in kids who never shower because using water hurts the environment, and then they go make shitty bands that whine about everything and tell us how perfect the world would be if they were in charge. Anyhow, since you brought it up, one thrash metal band that strangely reminds me of Crass is Helstar. Difference is Helstar makes logical arguments on situations they obviously looked at from more than one point of view, and of course, is metal. Check out their albums "Nosferatu" and "Distant Thunder" for a good time. James Rivera is an amazing vocalist. edit: fixed typos.
  18. Morris

    Chronicles of Narnia

    Developed, rather. Dwarves and orcs already had their places in mythologies. So did elves, but as a whole they're not simply drawn from any specific mythos or culture. Don't get me wrong, his world-building is fantastic, but the elements everyone praises it for aren't that big of a deal. He took entities from all over the place and mashed them together logically. What is amazing is the stories and histories and the way he mashed said entities together as the big picture. Though he did, doubtless, teach people (by "teach people", I mean pioneer) how to make much more vivid and alive worlds (edit: in fiction literature). And do forgive me, I'm really not as critical as I seem. edit #2: OK, you said "fantasy stereotypes", which means there's nothing to argue. Yes, he did, and this post is worthless. For some reason I read it as you were saying he created them. My apologies.
  19. Morris

    [newproject] Demon's Crest DOOM

    I think he means because gargoyles don't need a powerup, they can fly at will. Just set the server to play with 0 gravity.
  20. Morris

    Chronicles of Narnia

    Not true, at all. LOTR was inspired by the old and new testaments, Beowulf, Arthurian legend, countless fairytales, and the mythos of just about every culture and religion. There were people writing a genre called fantasy before him, LOTR was just the most in-depth story for the times, which made it more accessible and interesting to the general public. Indeed it's not a christian invention, I never said it was. However, Hebrew-based religions are the only religions that use goats and horns as a symbolism of evil (most religions use them for manhood or nature). Cyberdemon. (Baron of)Hell(Knight). Lost soul? Cacodemon? Although the pentacle and pentagram (which appear throughout the game repeatedly) have been used by various religions as a symbol of nature, spiritual inspiration, and more popularly as a warding sigil against "mean spirits", the christian church adopted it as the official symbol of satan during the Roman imperialism, and it appears repeatedly. I think the upside down crosses speak for themselves. I could be wrong in this, but I'm pretty sure Hebrew religions are the only ones where "hell" is a place where it's denizens can become demonic apparations hellbent, by nature, on wreaking havoc upon the mortal land. In Norse mythology, you went to "hel" (hmm, similar?) if you didn't please Odin, or another god that could talk him into allowing you into Valhalla. Valhalla was, GENERALLY, reserved for great warriors, so that sent a lot of people to "hel". They represented zombies, but if I recall, giant crabs were the only "demonic" being that came from it's bowels. It was a place of fire and brimstone, but it's denizens were ruled by (forgot her name), and were her dormant slaves until Loki fooled her into letting him summon them to war, promising her and them the rich soils of Midgard (the mortal land). Or so is the prophecy for ragnarock, the end of the world, which was never fulfilled. If I recall, everyone kept healthy human form in hades. It was just an island you went to when you died. There was a cramped pit of fire and brimstone where "evil" people were imprisoned, but other than that it was just a gloomy little island in the south. In order to get back mortality and set foot on mortal lands, someone who was dead would have to beat a mortal in a board game called Styx, not much unlike chess. They then could switch places with the mortal. Hardly mutated hordes swarming through a jumpgate and killing everything that moves. As you said, it's a pointless argument, but I feel it's safe to say that the "hell" used in Doom is based on the hebrew interpretation more than anything else. I know it's parodic, but parodies are based on what they're parodizing. Indeed. I only mentioned the authors you quoted me for because the debate those examples were for was "no-brainers". I'd also say adults can enjoy all the authors I listed, as I know they do. "No-brainer" doesn't mean that it doesn't paint interesting characters, vivid emotions, immersive atmosphere, and breathtaking scenery. It just means the plot is something like "Here's the good guys. Here's the bad guys. Here's what the good guys need to beat the bad guys. They're on their quest now to beat the bad guys. Here's the tragedy aspect. Here's the romance aspect. Plot twist. Quest quest quest. Plot twist. Action Action Action. Bad guy's dead/banished/imprisoned. Celebration. The end."
  21. You're the only person I didn't give their present to yet. You're going to wake up one morning and find that guitar replaced with a well used Samwick Les Paul worth $250 at most. Suprise! Merry Christmas! Seriously though, that is fucking sick. - Guitar shit (strings, picks, a new tuner) - C++ Primer Plus Fifth Edition - A slew of fantasy novels - A couple books on physics (Elegant Universe and Universe in a Nutshell) - Some metal CDs by bands most of you probably will never hear of. - Tons of new exercise equipment (fucking finally) - Finally got to see my brothers together again
  22. Morris

    [newproject] Demon's Crest DOOM

    Seeing as everyone's signed up and just developing DM, probably not. edit: I like the idea, screenshots look weird, but in motion it might work out alright.
  23. Morris

    Chronicles of Narnia

    Indeed, Enjay. I don't watch TV, so please explain. Claiming media "propaganda" for christianity and hebrew inspired spirituality is understandable, but also realize that's the main market for them. Why would they make sitcoms which embrace the morals and virtues of Norse mythology when neo-vikingism isn't exactly an internationally accepted religion, etc. There are movies and books that come out all the time that have athiestic, new-agist, and pagan morals and beliefs, but they're not abundant due to the fact that the market for them is very very small. But I have no clue what you mean when you say "storylines are based on events that are actually happening but are being put on TV to make us think they're made-up...". I don't watch TV at all, so that may be my ignorance, but what are they putting on TV, how do you know it's happening, and how do you know about it?
  24. To be honest, I like your current setup. Vintage feel, reminds me of looking for WADs way back when.
  25. Morris

    Chronicles of Narnia

    Yea, I hope my post made it clear that the hissy fits are useless and, generally, out of ignorance. And moreso, almost everyone who does it openly enjoys things that are a direct result of "white-light" religion. FFS, Doom is loosely based on jewish/christian beliefs. Fair enough, but for good fast-paced, no-brainer, all ages fantasy, I'd still recommend Terry Brook's "Shanarra" series, "Dragonlance" books that are (co)written by either Margaret Weis and/or Tracy Hickman, and of course, almost everything by R.A. Salvatore. Then again, this is 100% speculative. There are preteen/young adult accessible versions (at least of the Odyssey) that do the story a good amount of justice, though. I read one of the Odyssey in, I think, 4th or 5th grade, and thought it was spectacular. I think it's safe to say that it's what sparked my interested in epics. Fair enough though, it is a different crowd being marketed to. Again, a speculative argument. Honestly, I could tell you I've personally been to Middle-Earth and have seen the whole story of the Third Age with my own eyes. Then again though, I read the trilogy before I had any real responsibilities, so clearing my mind and focusing wasn't much of a difficulty. Yes, looking back recently through some pages in LOTR, his style in here is mechanical, but the immersive world generated as a direct effect of this is hard to par. Even though I prefer to read the style of other authors a bit more, the experience still isn't as awe-inspiring. I didn't read "Silmarillion" as a priority. I kept it on my bed stand and read a part of it whenever I didn't feel like reading whatever books I had prioritized at the time. For the most part, it's a collection of "historical" short stories (for lack of a better description), and the writing is much more large-scale and less heavy as it is in LOTR. I personally thought it was a lovely read, and haven't talked to anyone who has actually read it and said differently.
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