Jump to content
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Maes

Members
  • Content count

    16170
  • Joined

  • Last visited

About Maes

  • Rank
    Here's an old post I made on the subject,

Recent Profile Visitors

The recent visitors block is disabled and is not being shown to other users.

Single Status Update

See all updates by Maes

  1. I had this cheapo DVD I use as a disc-MP3 player acting up on me (it didn't play anything properly) so before scrapping it, I decided to give it a shot "repairing" it.

    I just googled something about DVD players not working...first forum I found it said it could be a worn out main spindle motor.

    I say "well, what the hell" and opened it up..yup, it had an el-cheapo brushed motor (that's bad, because these things wear down relatively quickly).

    I had a similar one, but before trying anything else...I just used some "tuner cleaner" (a special spray for switches).

    And hey-presto, it worked :-o

    * One el-cheapo DVD player repair in the books for me *

    1. Gokuma

      Gokuma

      Cool, congratulations.

      I fixed a record player.

      The auto-stop would kick in way early only letting me listen to the first song and maybe a half on any side of these punk 7"'s. I disabled the auto-stop by pulling its mechanism out of place.

    2. Dr. Zin

      Dr. Zin

      From the title I thought you had figured out some way to repair scratched or otherwise mutilated disks. That would make you a mint or two.

    3. Maes

      Maes

      Dr. Zin said:

      From the title I thought you had figured out some way to repair scratched or otherwise mutilated disks. That would make you a mint or two.


      Heh, most methods for repairing those fall into the urban legend category, sorry, especially if we're talking about snapped, burned, gashed or deeply scratched disks.

      The only thing you can try with a CD/DVD you can't read reliably in one player/reader, is to try it in a different one and make a copy of any salvageable data, that is, assuming the TOC is still readable.

      Minor scratches can be sort of repaired if you use some sort of slightly abrasive jelly (toothpaste) but that's no good for large gashes, and even then you're better off making a copy ASAP.

      DVDs can take some abuse on both of their sides as the information is "sandwiched" between two poly sheets, but scratches on the printed side of CDs are almost always fatal, as the data in on the printed side, not the poly side.

×