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Maes

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    Here's an old post I made on the subject,

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  1. It's by no means complete, as I've yet to take photos of the 486DLC machine (called "Quest II"), and of the Pentium 200 MMX one, and then I'm not very exhaustive about details. However, here goes:

    "0ldsk00l":

    This one is almost literally out of the garbage, built in with parts found a bit everywhere: the PSU is a modern 400 W 24-pin ATX one, found in the trash because it had blown a fuse. Replaced it (soldered in a replaceable fuse holder), and now it works like a charm, powerful and quiet. There's a detailed description of it here. Mainly used for surfing, downloading, torrents etc. which it handles nicely. Even works with Java stuff and Office.

    An overview of "0ldsk00l"

    A view of the ITE 8218 IDE controller, used to replace the dead onboard ones. At first, I had tried with this weird anonymous IDE + floppy controller. It worked flawlessly though, so I keep it as a backup, you never know.

    1. Show previous comments  1 more
    2. Bucket

      Bucket

      That's pretty cool. Sadly, in my old boxen it's always the drives that fail so I have no way of knowing if anything is salvageable unless I spend more money.

    3. Super Jamie

      Super Jamie

      Hooray!

      I can't imagine trying to find a faulty RAM chip on an XT. I never worked on them, but an old boss of mine did. He said you had to pull every one out and test them individually. It was just as big a pain in the ass as you'd think.

      If you pulled the motherboard out of the XT you'd probably find an FCC ID or something on the back, and could maybe find a manual for those dip switches.

      How is the floppy controller different? Many early 5.25" controllers had edge connectors (like an ISA card) instead of the more modern 34-pin IDC connector. If it works with the 3.5" drive I'd assume it's just normal IBM PC floppy standard.

      I've never looked at the amp on my SB16, I should check it out sometime. OPL2 chips are huge compared to OPL3 :P There's a clearer shot of your card (probably scanned) here.

    4. Maes

      Maes

      Super Jamie said:

      Hooray!

      I can't imagine trying to find a faulty RAM chip on an XT.


      Well, running memtest or a similar utility should be possible. By some guesswork on the address scheme, you can probably narrow down to 4 or 2 possibly faulty chips. The chips themselves are generic DRAM or SRAM, which should be possible to find easily (don't expect great value for money though ;-)

      Super Jamie said:

      If you pulled the motherboard out of the XT you'd probably find an FCC ID or something on the back, and could maybe find a manual for those dip switches.


      Surprisingly enough the dip switches are standard for all XT-compatibles, and there are lists on the Internet that tell you what every switch does, like this one here. Isn't it wonderful? Unified settings for all similar motherboards :-D

      No idea what the make is though...on the front it says just "TURBO XT 8 MHz", and maybe some FCC number somewhere...but it doesn't really matter: it's really easy to configure, much easier than any Pentium or 486 mobo I've seen. On the other hand, if you want to overclock or replace the CPU....happy (de)soldering! And good luck finding a suitable quartz crystal that will work without blowing everything up. It would be awesome if a pin-compatible "super 8088" could be plugged in though, with superscalar architecture, internal cache, internal FPU etc. :-D


      Super Jamie said:

      How is the floppy controller different? Many early 5.25" controllers had edge connectors (like an ISA card) instead of the more modern 34-pin IDC connector


      Exactly that, I had completely removed the fact that older computers had edge connectors (this included an Amstrad CPC 6128 I had years ago, the external drive connector was a 5.25" edge connector. The internal 3" drive on that one however had a standard IDC connector...well not quite, it was 26 or 28 pin.

      Super Jamie said:

      There's a clearer shot of your card (probably scanned) here.


      LMAO, they removed the OPL2 and the companion YM3014A DAC chip on that one (the only empty 8-pin socket). Compare it with mine ;-)

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