Is beer as bad for your teeth as soda?

Aliotroph? said:

If they did it would imply there was a selection pressure favouring people who could metabolize alcohol faster. I've never seen anything to suggest that either.




As ancient Asian philosopher once said, "To pork chick, man must go out. To go out, man must stop playing Starcraft all day. To stop playing Starcraft all day, man must overcome inhibition. To overcome inhibition, man must drink".

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hardcore_gamer said:

2. I know alcohol contains sugar because it needs it to ferment (I think?). Does this mean alcohol is bad for your teeth? Or doesn't it matter because the actual alcohol makes up such a small portion of your drink anyways unless you are drinking it very strong?

3. When drinking drinks like sodas, which is worse for your teeth: The sugar or the acids?


2. "Alcohol" does not have sugar and it's a separate molecule entire from sugar. Many alcoholic drinks can contain sugar, though. There isn't enough sugar (maltose) in beer to have to consider tooth damage in that sense.

3. Since sugar can potentially destroy your teeth in a shorter term, it's worse.

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buttspit said:

3. Since sugar can potentially destroy your teeth in a shorter term, it's worse.


Actually, if the sugars always stayed sugars they would do exactly zero damage to your teeth. What actually damages them is the acid created by the bacteria that eat the sugars, if you let them sit there for long enough. So of course it's the acid that's worse, but since there aren't many foods that are acid and corrosive without being sweet then yes, sugary foods are about the worst you can eat (the only exception: salt & vinegar snacks. Those are a nasty combination of salty, gritty and acid, that just munching a few is enough to feel them "working" against the exposed parts of your teeth and between your gums. Ouch O_o

And in any case, if you eat sugary stuff AND let a muck made of sugary residues coat your teeth and fester for hours without even having the common sense of at least rinsing your mouth with some fresh water to melt away some of the syrupy muck, well, then you were asking for it, and it's pretty much moot worrying about the traces of sugar that might still be present in alcoholic drinks.

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Maes said:

Actually, if the sugars always stayed sugars they would do exactly zero damage to your teeth. What actually damages them is the acid created by the bacteria that eat the sugars, if you let them sit there for long enough. So of course it's the acid that's worse, but since there aren't many foods that are acid and corrosive without being sweet then yes, sugary foods are about the worst you can eat (the only exception: salt & vinegar snacks. Those are a nasty combination of salty, gritty and acid, that just munching a few is enough to feel them "working" against the exposed parts of your teeth and between your gums. Ouch O_o

And in any case, if you eat sugary stuff AND let a muck made of sugary residues coat your teeth and fester for hours without even having the common sense of at least rinsing your mouth with some fresh water to melt away some of the syrupy muck, well, then you were asking for it, and it's pretty much moot worrying about the traces of sugar that might still be present in alcoholic drinks.


That's pretty much the reason, I just didn't elaborate on that.

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In addition, carbonated drinks (especially citrus and cola types) contain a bunch of additive acids like citric acid, orthophosphoric acid, plus the carbonic acid present in the liquid itself due to, well, carbonation.

Not much love for your teeth, indeed O_o

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