BlueFeena

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  1. The bunny ending was originally a sketch; I believe Romero said it was drawn by Adrian Carmack. In the original sketch, you can clearly see that the mysterious object to the left is a building. It all likeliness, what your looking in the final artwork is a coloring error. If you look at the top right of the erroneous structure, you can clearly see what appears to be a bit of "building" that was never finished. Edit: Here's the original sketch. The error is clearly visible on the top left, suggesting that Adrian may simply may not have bothered to finish the drawing and the subsequent building for that matter. You can clearly see the silhouette of the building and what appears to be preliminary shading.
  2. While I'm not under the impression that sector mergers will affect your frame rate, merging similar sectors will reduce the map's file size by a small amount. This is generally important for vanilla maps that are scraping up against the save game limit.
  3. Could you clarify these points with some examples from some node builders? Legitimately curious here. I've been using Zen Node for all of my vanilla related work, and I'm fairly certain I'm using some compression option than only Zen Node supports. I've never seen node generation take any longer than a few seconds, and if the the reject lump isn't being built, I'd sure like to know. Bare in mind, I'm doing all of my work on a quad core I7. At the risk of answering my own question, I am not aware that vanilla fully supports an empty reject lump -- an empty reject lump results in most monsters becoming blind, as I've come across a few supposedly vanilla compatible maps that either had an empty reject lump or not one at all!
  4. Actually, no, not all PS3's have proper PS1 compatibility. I once popped Driver into an unknown model of PS3 and half of the menus refused to display correctly. The game logic worked, but it was a graphical mess at times. Also, PS2's technically do not support all PlayStation 1 games, but I'm probably the only weirdo who actually has one or two games that don't seem to like a PS2. One of the extremely old PlayStation Sampler discs that came out early in the console's life would crash when a demo finished, and Grandia had a tendency to randomly lock up for no reason. All of my discs are very good condition, by the way.
  5. In tandem with what Baron said, I'd just like to point out that Capcom may no longer even have workstations to read and modify the original game in the first place. Some of the computer screens in RE2 suggest Capcom used non-Windows based computers; I think they used something called the "Air" workstation but I've never found anything useful pertaining to what the computer was. Then there's the simple fact that, along with the source code that Baron mentioned, it's unlikely Capcom even has the original background models anymore. In order to re-build Resident Evil, you'd need:The original background models. The collision models that went along with them; who the hell knows how Capcom built them, or if they're in any type of model format that can even be read by Capcom staff. A third party hacking tool that was released suggests that Resident Evil levels are 2D(?) akin to Doom(?) Were there ever any floor-over-floor sections, ignoring crate pushing puzzles? The source code, duh. The in-game models, sound, music, movies, and lots of other bits I'm forgetting. Considering how the original game was a low-budget project that the staff expected to bomb upon release, very little time and effort was put into the original game's level artwork. Some of the rooms are hollow boxes with textures. HOLLOW. BOXES. Good luck making that look presentable in 640x480. :P
  6. Just noticed this, but E3M2 also seems to be missing the staircase at the player's spawn point. Are there even any player starts in that version? I'm having trouble seeing the thing colors.
  7. By my understanding, all of that is based on an actual leak of a very rare copy of Resident Evil 1.5. In its original form, the game was barely functional. I have an old copy of the slightly fixed up version. The game crashes if you fire certain weapons at enemies, picking up items would break the game, and most rooms were only accessible via debug commands. Worthy of note, someone found the unused body armor models still within the prototype, but it was only accessible via RAM hacking. Don't expect Capcom to release anything official pertaining to 1.5; the director behind Resident Evil 2 actively ignores or rejects requests for details or information about the canceled game. On another note, I was very surprised to see a PC version of the REmake pop up at all. Considering how Capcom lost the source code to the Outbreak games, I was amazed they still even have the source code for their older projects. Edit: I've never heard such a thing; what you're probably thinking of is the now-rare demo that came with early prints of Resident Evil: Director's Cut in the United States. I can't say if other regions came with a copy of the demo. The demo was basically everything Capcom had built after scrapping 1.5; there's even tons of unused 1.5 content still on the disc.
  8. To be fair, I have seen some yellow / brown skies akin to what's seen in Doom 2. However, those were always exclusive to adverse weather, typically hurricane or tornado conditions I think.
  9. Relax guys, my goal wasn't to start an argument or step on anyone's toes. Let's try this again and have me articulate my point better. Posting at two in the morning when my brain was running sub-optimally probably wasn't a wise idea. :) My point was simply this: it sometimes seems as though the contributions of Hall and Peterson are brushed aside, especially considering their work makes up the bulk of the original episodes. To say that Romero was the level design lead strikes me as factually incorrect; Peterson, and previously Hall, even had the design credit on the ENDDOOM screen. None of this is trying to say that Romero's level aren't a huge and iconic part of the game. Apart from that, it looks like a perfectly fun video series that I need to watch through some time. Hearing tidbits from the id guys is always fun. Also, that guy really does have an utterly hideous beard. :P
  10. I couldn't take it any longer when Seth Rogan that guy who desperately needs to shave described Romero as the lead level designer. Peterson and Hall weep.
  11. Just to clarify, how exactly did you put two posts in a single image? Is this demarcated by the transparent pixels, or something else in the image or lump? I read through both your post and the wiki article, but it still seems a bit vague.
  12. Based on that photo of id, the fuel packs look like fuses. Don or Gregory probably added random metal bits to touch them up.
  13. That doesn't ruin anything. That's the most atmospheric McDonald's I've ever seen. :) Speaking of which, is that actually the mountains, as in, the actual two seen in the background, or just a general photograph of Yangshuo County?
  14. You won't be able to use your TNT wad for multiplayer, as modifying MAP31 will obviously cause the wad to differ from what everyone else has. Also, the MAP31 fix has different nodes by my understanding. I think there's a trap that doesn't fire correctly in the base level, something that Team TNT was aware of but id opted not to fix it for whatever reason.
  15. The software renderer is something of an enigma; most people aren't aware of all its hard memory limits that the Open GL renderer gets around, yet the software renderer can sometimes make broken maps bootable. A map plagued by allocblock: full is one of the most infamous. I think Sniper attributed it to some ram limitation that Valve hard coded to some bizarre value. (?)