RUSH

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About RUSH

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  1. Prometheus from Starsiege (1999). I don't have words to describe how terrifying it was (as a kid) to finally reach this boss in the human campaign. Mainly because it's a robot mastermind that's hyped up in the most over-the-top melodramatic way imaginable: Also, one of those instances where the boss battle actually lives up to the intimidating expectations. Scary looking, and verbally taunts you at first sight (while charging from a distance). He is very difficult to defeat as well (10-20 tries at least). Thankfully the hype leading up to the ending is well deserved in that respect.
  2. I totally agree with this. Some people place far too much value on the number score a game is given. And when their favorite game (that they cherish oh so dearly) gets a number even slightly lower than what they have in mind, they go crazy. I can understand some of the frustration though, considering games like Call of Duty often always get high scores, while some overlooked and undervalued titles with less attention (that can be quite good too) still end up with a lower score. In this way it feels unjust, skewed, and biased. Still though, I've always thought that the best way to judge a game is to look at some bare bones YouTube gameplay and decide for yourself. No commentary, just gameplay. If it looks interesting, pick it up and give it a try. Fretting endlessly about a number review score won't do anyone any good at the end of the day. Especially considering opinions vary so much. But to some people, the rest of the world must feel the same way about a game as they do. Or else! Feel the wrath!
  3. How do we define toxic? In my mind, toxic communities are ones that are filled with vapid thought. Nothing of substance to say, no conversations to be had, etc. By that definition, I would go with Call of Duty being the "winner" of the most toxic. Hands down. In my experience, the entirety of that game is filled with nothing but children throwing around insults, along with obnoxious adults who think they rule the world. Because they can shoot more people than you. I would have less of a problem with that sort of mentality if it wasn't so constantly condescending. The cut-throat attitude everyone shared robbed some sense of fun in the game for me. It's all filled with people who only care about winning, and nothing else. As if losing is somehow the end of the world. I remember back when I was seriously into Call of Duty, I got to a point of boredom where I'd run around with weird/stupid guns just to see how many kills I could get. Which was actually way more fun. Sometimes I would come out on top in Free-For-All with a bad gun, and everyone would be absolutely furious. Shit talking me like "you're so autistic, you don't even know what the good guns are" etc. It was really hilarious to mess with people in this way, because of how seriously they took themselves. They honestly couldn't see the humor of doing something new and interesting that (heaven forbid) might mean you had a disadvantage! The horror! Surely that can't be fun? Also, their ego shattered to pieces by the thought of losing to someone who doesn't know the best way to play. It's narrow minded, repetitive and sterile. And yet despite all of that, it can be a lot of fun too. Not a game I would ever play for the community aspect, personally (I never truly made any friends there at all). But nonetheless, it's a nice and quick means to vent frustration. Quick to load and play, quick to jump into, etc. It isn't all bad.
  4. I think the 'Cavern' levels were my favorite. So much atmosphere oozing in those maps, being near the end of the game and all. The deep underground felt really cold, detached and isolated. Which is quintessentially Doom. Also, finding these neat set pieces was awesome (clearly inspired by Alien). Reminded me of the scene where Kane encounters the facehugger: Creepy ambient sounds, falling rocks, and tough spawn-in encounters made for some pretty unpredictable and unsettling gameplay moments. Also, that huge elevator leading further underground. It's just the part of the game that I found the most memorable. "Caverns - Area 1" has the last survivor you see in-game as well, J. Katayama. Kind of insane to think he survived that long, pretty near the entire game. Apparently he died as there were no other survivors, but I have no idea how. He was easily the most well hidden person in the base. I don't see how anything could have gotten near him.
  5. The GOUT DVDs look pretty nice on a PC sized screen with the darkness lowered and the contrast raised. That being said, I wouldn't recommend people buy them unless they're okay with low resolution. The DVDs look terrible on a large HD television. Totally outdated, but still better than VHS quality. This is why I wish George Lucus would do a proper official release of the original unaltered versions. It's so annoying how he treats his fan base. 'The Empire Strikes Back' Blu-Ray is pretty good at least, I agree. I wish 'A New Hope' and 'Return of the Jedi' turned out equally good. Most of the changes done to those two were appalling.
  6. I recently re-watched the original Star Wars trilogy. I bought the 'GOUT' DVD editions from 2006, which come with a bonus disc that contains the 'original unaltered theatrical cut' of the films. Really awesome stuff. It's a total relief to experience the movies without some of the horrible "Special Edition" changes George Lucas later added (most were terrible and unnecessary as fans already know). In addition, you can rip the movies to ISO format and play them with VLC Media Player. In VLC you can darken the colors, contrast, etc and tweak the movie (visually) to your desires. There's also an option to change the presented aspect ratio. It was a surprisingly fun experience, fiddling with the features and all. I know "Harmy's Despecialized Edition" of the films already exists online for download. Those ones are in much higher (HD) quality, but lack some of the grit present on the 1993 laser-disc transfer (used for the GOUT DVD). As a fan of old horror movies, I actually enjoy that sort of dirty quality. But man, those Ewoks still annoy the hell out of me. Even as a kid I remember thinking they were stupid. They shouldn't have played such a big role in Return of the Jedi. An entire legion of the best Imperial troops lose to teddy bears? Seriously? Give me a break! Rest was awesome though. 'A New Hope' and 'The Empire Strikes Back' are perfect films, once you take away the special edition changes at least. Although some of the changes made to 'The Empire Strikes Back' weren't actually too bad.
  7. Lost Souls and Cherubs give me anxiety. Every time I hear their alert sound I get a little jittery and paranoid. I wouldn't say 'fear' or 'scared' so much as it's just a certain eagerness to get the hell away. Oh, same with the Maggots also. I think it's the jerky movement that makes me uneasy. And the weird sounds they make while they creep along the floor and then suddenly pop up in your face.
  8. Ahh yeah, you're right. It was after disagreeing. That's the last time you talk to him as an ally though, isn't it?
  9. I feel a lot of nostalgia for Doom 3, and other games around the same time period. Not so much for 2D style NES games, mainly because I didn't grow up with them. I think it's less about the graphics themselves, and more about the memories and experiences you had when you were younger. It brings back a different state of mind.
  10. Actually, if you choose to side with Sgt Kelly in Communications Transfer, you hear his transmission get cut off with static. The sound of enemy Z-Sec soldiers follow. I suspect that this is where Kelly was converted and possessed. You don't hear from him again until much later in the game, and by that point he looks and sounds very different.
  11. The intensity and priority of pursuit against Doomguy really climbed after the last of Bravo Team died. Sure, there were many lone survivors left still, but most were unarmed scientists in hiding. The only three left that actually posed any threat were Doomguy, Campbell (body guard of Counselor Swan), and Sgt Kelly. Once Sgt Kelly got converted, things got really bad really fast. I think that's when they decided to call in the big guns and take out the remaining two marines. Mainly because Campbell had the BFG and was proving to be pretty near unstoppable for the majority of the game. Once Kelly took out Campbell, Swan quickly died immediately afterwards. Sometimes I wonder how different the game would have turned out if Doomguy had actually met up with Campbell and Swan. Remember that mission where you have to make a choice and join a side, in Communications Transfer? It sucks because either way, the outcome remains the same. You can't meet up with the Campbell/Swan crew even if you choose their side because Betruger destroys the bridge leading to their hiding place. A shame. If the three of them could have united earlier into the game, they'd have probably made for a really great team. Maybe strong enough to have defeated the hell invasion in about half the time.