Woolie Wool

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  1. Keep in mind that modern game levels are not designed by one person the way classic FPS levels were. Doom 3 maps likely were the work of teams of people, not an individual designer, and many assets were made specifically for a certain area instead of being general-purpose textures like classic Doom has. That amount of work is far more feasible when you have multiple environmental artists, a geometry designer, a scripter, a sound designer, and a lead designer to coordinate everything. Possibly other people as well. Doom 3 was fairly early in this process, and level design has become even more complicated and collaborative in the years since.
  2. This is kind of cool but there is a lot of wasted space. You could add an armor box or something like that with all the space you're not using for anything.
  3. For me, infinitely tall actors, elastic collisions, and the blockmap bug are bits that Doom would really be better off without. They're all counterintuitive, frustrating, and make the game seem less polished and professional. The default arrow key controls are also terrible and taught me a lot of really bad habits in the '90s that hobbled me playing later FPS games for years. MUS format also sucks but that's not something ordinary players have to worry about, only modders and level designers. Hell, instead of MUS I'll just nominate DMX as a whole. John Carmack was right about it being a mistake. I can't agree with you for the first two. Doom's gameplay flow doesn't need or lend itself well to reloading. And while a Doomlady would be nice, I'm not sure how you could get transgender representation into Doom without going with something like a character creation system (allowing the player to create an avatar with the player's own desired gender presentation instead of relying on the developers' preset characters) like modern games have, which 2.5D sprite-based games are not suited for, at all. The sprite compositing would absolutely kill the average gaming machine of 1993 and it would not look very good, and everything about Doom flows out of its engine and the constraints that puts on the game design, so Doom cannot be separated from low-res 2.5D graphics. So yeah, it is archaic, but this archaicism is not as easily fixed as the others. E: Unless the last bit was part of your performance-art trolling masterpiece you did later, in which case well done, you got me.
  4. I love gothic medieval maps, whether using GothicDM textures, Eternal textures, both, or neither. The darker and creepier and spookier, the better.
  5. Main rig: Corsair Crystal Series 470X case Antec HCG-620 620W power supply Gigabyte AB350 Gaming 3 motherboard AMD Ryzen 5 1600 hex-core CPU @ 3.8 GHz 16 GB DDR4 RAM EVGA nVidia GTX 1060 6GB GPU 525GB Samsung SATA SSD Intel 802.11ac wireless network card 2TB WD Red SATA HDD Windows 10 Home x64 Dell U2412M 24" IPS 1920x1200 monitor Schiit Modi 2 Uber external sound DAC Roland UM-ONE USB Midi Interface GlowGeek USB optical drive (I miss my 5.25" bays!) Roland Sound Canvas SC-55 MkII MIDI synthesizer Schiit Valhalla vacuum tube headphone amplifier Sennheiser HD 650 headphones Thrustmaster T.1600M joystick 1997 IBM Model M13 buckling spring keyboard Logitech G502 Proteus Spectrum mouse Media rig: Corsair Elite 130 Mini-ITX case Corsair CX550M 550W PSU Gigabyte GA-H81N motherboard Haswell Intel Pentium G3258 dual-core CPU @ 3.2 GHz Intel integrated graphics 8GB DDR3 1400 RAM 1TB WD Blue SATA HDD LG BD-ROM/CD-RW/DVD-RW drive Ubuntu Linux 16.04 Some garbage "HD" television I can't wait to get rid of Schiit Bifrost DAC going into an external stereo system Unicomp Classic 101 buckling spring keyboard Logitech G303 Daedalus Apex (who comes up with these stupid names?) mouse Retro experimental PC: 2001 Dell Dimension 4300 with... Crappy proprietary motherboard Williamette Intel Pentium 4 single-core CPU @ 1.5 GHz 512 MB PC133 SDRAM THE WORST CASE EVER Dell 250W proprietary PSU nVidia GeForce 2 MX 64MB GPU 1 x 20 GB, 1 x 80 GB IDE HDDs Lite-On 32x CD-ROM drive Generic 3.5" floppy drive Windows 98 SE with Unofficial Service Pack 3 and KernelEx, boots to MS-DOS 7.1 by default (C:\), Windows 2000 SP4 w/ BlackWingCat's unofficial updates (D:\) NEC MultiSync LCD2070NX 20" 1600x1200 S-IPS monitor Aureal Vortex Advantage AU8810 sound card Monsoon MM-2000 4.1 surround speakers (rear speakers unused because the sound card has no rear speaker support!) Sennheiser HD 598 headphones Saitek Cyborg FLY 5 joystick Logitech MX518 mouse with PS/2 adapter Dell AT101W Alps switch keyboard Laptop: Lenovo Thinkpad T520 Sandy Bridge Intel Core i7-2640M dual-core CPU @ 2.8 GHz 4 GB DDR3-1333 RAM nVidia Quadro NVS 4200M GPU 320 GB SATA HDD CD/DVD-everything drive Xubuntu Linux 17.04 IBM 7-row keyboard and trackpoint 15.4" 1600x900 display
  6. Armor makes gameplay simply by adding an additional wrinkle to Doom's resource management mechanics. When armor and health are tracked and replenished independently it gives the player another thing to think about and the level designer many more opportunities for dynamic enemy encounters, item-based gameplay (i.e. armor or health denial), and tension/release loops to provide a more powerful experience for the player. Personally I can't wait to be able to use armor in ECWolf mods, the lack of it is a serious limitation for level design in the Wolfenstein engine (and perhaps even moreso than a lack of armor would be for Doom, considering how heavily Wolfenstein tilts towards hitscan threats).
  7. Because that's how capitalism works. You price your product to whatever compromise between revenue per unit and units sold will get you the most gross revenue (rule #1 of business: make money). If your audience is hardcore fanboys, then you can push pretty hard because they are willing to spend a lot of money and more cost-conscious mainstream consumers aren't going to buy your product anyway. E: Is there a text-only version of the edit box anymore? I fucked up the quotes and I have no idea how to fix it with the new software without deleting the whole post and starting over.
  8. Because of a number of reasons: 1. Cartridges use much more material and have many more parts than the optical discs modern games come on, if they're packaged for retail at all. Cost of manufacture for cartridges was one of the reasons the N64 lost most of Nintendo's third-party developers to the PlayStation. Even an SD card costs vastly less to produce than a cartridge. 2. The "primitive" chips aren't the sort of thing you can just put an order for ten million of from any random company. The design isn't current, nobody uses it, and you're going to have to pay out the ass for the chips because they're being specially made just for your project and you have no economies of scale. The cartridge casing and PCB are also likely custom jobs that cost a lot more money than they would have in the '90s. This drives up prices even further. 3. These newly made SNES carts are being made for hardcore fighting game and SNES fans who will be willing to pay a lot of money for a collector's item. Frankly I'm surprised it doesn't cost more than $100. Low-volume production of old technology is expensive as hell. If someone tried to manufacture a new 486-clone FreeDOS retro machine, the cost per unit of newly made 486 processors would probably be absolutely outrageous and sink the project immediately.
  9. My KB is a 1997 IBM Model M13 (a black version of the regular Model M with a ThinkPad trackpoint in the middle), plugged into my computer's PS/2 port. Aside from n-key rollover, IBM Model M keyboards have everything I could possibly want and are vastly superior to Cherry switch boards. The Mouse is a Logitech G502 with the RGB. They look a bit strange next to each other, since the Model M13 is a giant hulking ABS plastic and steel tank while the G502 is really kind of silly looking with the stealth space fighter styling but it fits wonderfully in my hand.
  10. Buy a used NEC MultiSync on eBay. I got a 20" 1600x1200 S-IPS monitor for $60 (original price was probably ten times that). Other than its almost CRT-like mass (over 20 pounds), frustrating stand mount, and CCFL backlight that's dimmer than modern LCD backlights, it's a great display. A 1920x1200 widescreen one would probably run you about twice as much and weigh even more, but it's certainly a lot cheaper than a new one.
  11. Congratulations on completely failing to miss my point, which is for the vast majority of people who have ever existed in human history, the social function of music--celebration, community, dancing, and yes, "lifestyle and identity" has always been more important than the content of the music itself. There were and still are cultures where music is never created just for its own sake, but only as a backdrop to a ceremonial or social occasion--even in Europe "absolute music" didn't exist until around 1500. Also "a vector for lifestyle and identity" defines a large proportion of the currently extant heavy metal bands, which mostly write metal based on other metal for metalheads with suitably "metal" lyrics and band costumes and stage sets and the like. Metal is pretty much a closed circle of the same ideas recycling endlessly now.
  12. You do realize this is why "normal" people listen to music, right? Listening to music entirely for its own sake is actually a rather eccentric thing, and most people use music as a conduit for some sort of social experience, right? This is why club music is so popular--it's catchy, danceable music to jump around and have a good time and bond with other people to. The fact that the music doesn't stand up to scrutiny if you sit in your chair analyzing it misses its point. And I'm not going to be an awful try-hard Something Awful troll who's going to bash you for liking something "nerdy", but do realize that your point of view is not and will never be shared by the majority of people. Do you think people in the 18th century sat around listening to Haydn and Mozart symphonies all day? No, they mostly listened to "simple songs" made for dancing, drinking, and social entertainment, whether it's a minuet (Haydn and Mozart wrote hundreds and hundreds of minuets as formulaic and disposable as any Taylor Swift song) at a country estate or some drinking song in a village tavern that was never written down and is now lost to the sands of time. And yes, this goes to "social/political statements" too. You can easily create a shared political experience around a pop song or a punk fight song or something else simple, clear, and catchy that everyone can join into and share the vibe. You cannot rally a protest around Achilles: Agony and Ecstasy in Eight Parts or whatever that ridiculous Manowar "epic" was called. If that's Sergeant D (and I'm not about to read the article to find out), his whole schtick was posing as an over-the-top hipster stereotype and saying things that outrage metalheads. And comparing him to something like Kotaku is absurd. Kotaku actually does real journalism and real opinions--you might not personally like their opinions since they take a stand on identity politics that makes a lot of white male gamers uncomfortable, but Sergeant D was just an asshole who pissed people off for attention. BTW you guys clutching your pearls at his article accomplished exactly what he wanted it to and made MetalSucks money. Congratulations, you have all just been clickbaited!
  13. Random key? The reload key is universally R, which is right next to the WASD cluster. The stock newschool FPS control scheme--WASD for movement, mouse for orientation, E for interactions, R for reloading, Ctrl for crouching, Space for jumping--is extremely efficient. Your left hand never has to leave the WASD cluster.
  14. I first encountered reloading in the late 1990s/early '00s and I don't know if Return to Castle Wolfenstein was the first, but it was one of the first. Really, there wasn't anything to get used to, these were new games, and they had new mechanics, including reloading weapons. Back then, it was actually expected that a new games would have a learning curve. It was no big deal.