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Dark Pulse

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About Dark Pulse

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    ...and I thank you for playing!

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  1. Dark Pulse

    Does any of you know this fps game from the year 1991?

    Yes, but that was a PC game, not a Game Boy one. Obviously a PC is going to be able to do more than a handheld made in the late 80s using mostly computer chips that were developed in the early-mid 80s.
  2. Dark Pulse

    Does any of you know this fps game from the year 1991?

    Not trying to knock you, but there's plenty of very obvious things that point to it not being on Game Boy. Namely... The information already provided. The fact it has textures, period. The fact there is clearly mouselook. The fact it is running with any sort of good framerate at all. The fact it is high-definition. The fact it is widescreen. It's obviously meant to evoke the feel of the era, but it's far from that. If you'd like to see how an ACTUAL 1991 FPS on the Game Boy ran, just look here. As you'll see, it's pretty much night and day.
  3. Dark Pulse

    Sonic the Hedgehog franchise discussion

    Apparently the Follins had nothing to do with the MD port, so that was someone else porting Tim Follin's music, which is why it sucks. The only MD game Tim ever got to work on directly was Time Trax... which was never officially released. Luckily, a beta ROM was found and dumped, and it had the music, so we get to enjoy it. Damn right it does. Tim Follin in general kicks ass, and I will throw his name into the VGM arena until my dying breath.
  4. Dark Pulse

    Sonic the Hedgehog franchise discussion

    Yeah, the common thread seems to be that a lot of the guys who were really good on the YM2612 came from a PC98 background. And obviously that makes plenty of sense. :P True! Tim Follin did do great stuff with guitars on Rock 'n Roll Racing and Spider-Man/X-Men: Arcade's Revenge. Mega Man X is another good candidate for that. It should be noted, though, that I am speaking in generalizations. On the SNES, you very much lived or died by your samples (just like on the YM2612, you lived or died by your instruments), and if they were great and you were competent, you could make them sound great - and if they were lousy, you could make them sound terrible. A lot of people here remember Doom 32X's FM farts, after all. A lot of people here are also familiar with people who properly went over those songs and made them sound absolutely great. And obviously more than a few know the SNES version of Doom is quite noted for its soundtrack. It's just all relative. Both could do anything, but they definitely lent themselves better to certain things. Well, which ones? Tokuhiko Uwabo (AKA "Bo") did the first two all by himself (and the first one, of course, was on the Master System, so that wasn't even FM, unless you had the optional addon). 3 and 4 were done by Izuho Takeuchi (or as she's now named, Izuho Numata), with Masaki Nakagaki added in on 4. 4 was definitely a great soundtrack though, I'll absolutely give you that. Feels like a lifetime ago (it kind of was - it was founded back in 2006!), but yes :) That's why I actually felt some pressure last night when Doomkid challenged me on the Sandstream to recognize a song from a Genesis game. Yeah. Like, some people figured out some very clever tricks with the SPC700 (David Wise with Donkey Kong country and how he got that rising Korg synth on Aquatic Ambiance via multiple samples comes to mind; Tim Follin's harmonica on Plok's title tune also does), but it was very much a system where your composition was only as good as your samples - and of course, you had a pretty limited RAM for that, so getting the best you could out of as small samples as possible was really the thing. No need to worry about that on the Genesis unless you were trying to do PCM stuff, of course, but a lot of games used that pretty sparingly. I do remember Skitchin' had some hella shreddin' guitars, though. Jeff van Dyck definitely entered my consciousness with that game...
  5. Dark Pulse

    Sonic the Hedgehog franchise discussion

    Been there since the start. Had me some good times. Spent a lot of Saturday mornings watching SatAM, skipped school some days to watch AoSTH. As someone who co-founded Project2612, I will generally agree - I'm biased as fuck. But I will also caveat that with that there were also some excellent SNES soundtracks. Genesis did a lot better at more rock or synthy, up-tempo stuff. SNES though was fantastic for stuff that would feel more orchestral - David Wise's Donkey Kong Country soundtracks, Yasunori Mitsuda's Chrono Trigger score, Tim Follin's soundtracks for Plok! and Spider-Man/X-Men: Arcade's Revenge (and Equinox, if you're willing to go for something more ambient)... all excellent SNES soundtracks. Genesis had its heroes too - Yuzo Koshiro (Streets of Rage/Beyond Oasis/Shinobi), Hitoshi Sakimoto (Devilish, Gauntlet IV, Midnight Resistance), Motoi Sakuraba (Granada, El Viento, Arcus Odyssey), Motoaki Takenouchi (Jewel Master, Shining Force II, Landstalker), Tomoko Sasaki (Ristar, World of Illusion), and of course Michiru Yamane (Castlevania: Bloodlines, Contra: Hard Corps, Rocket Knight Adventures) got her start on the Genesis. Basically, a bad composer would make either soundchip suck, and a great one would draw out the very best. No matter what system you rooted for, there were just some composers who really had it.
  6. Dark Pulse

    Looking for Nightmare Spectre sprites [SOLVED]

    The health field is a multiplier then? Didn't know that, thought it was a straight-up value.
  7. This is correct. GEC Master Edition uses this extensively in a bunch of maps for a bunch of different monsters. Technically it can apply to any placeable Thing, so you can have Nightmare Barrels, Nightmare Candelabras...
  8. Dark Pulse

    Looking for Nightmare Spectre sprites [SOLVED]

    You mean Health = 600. Health = 2 would be a pretty wimpy nightmare. :P
  9. Dark Pulse

    Looking for Nightmare Spectre sprites [SOLVED]

    The effect is caused simply by subtractively blending the normal sprites.
  10. GEC has said they do plan for that, but it will be named something else I think. Master Edition will solely be the cut maps.
  11. No, that's how it is. Master Edition is about reinserting cut content or content created in official forms after the game's release - therefore, the original PSX maps are removed. The first "official" replacement for Doom would be Romero's E1M4B, Phobos Mission Control. SIGIL is a new episode in and of itself, so it starts at E5M1. Doom II had all of its maps up to Downtown, so that's first. NRFTL indeed begins on The Earth Base. Final Doom on PSX included a bunch of Master Levels content; of the ones it did not include, The Garrison was first. TNT on PSX Final Doom had a bunch of its levels; Power Control was the first one not included. Plutonia on PSX Final Doom had a bunch of its levels; Well of Souls was the first one not included.
  12. Yeah. That check might have been added once Doom II came out, but since this is based on JagDoom (which, in turn, was based on Doom 1.2's codebase if memory serves), that check might not be present, and need to be added. That's what I was going to suggest to do.
  13. Dark Pulse

    Can someone tell me how he does not get harmed by fires?

    Sure, but at that point you're also opening yourself up for someone to do it better if they do tricks you don't, which is my point.
  14. I suspect that it's doing the check like PC Doom does - that is, when Doomguy's feet are on the floor. So theoretically, if he is thrown up in the air and then killed, it will never process its check.
  15. Dark Pulse

    Can someone tell me how he does not get harmed by fires?

    Precisely! The movements have to be planned, you may have to manipulate monsters into or out of position to prevent (or take, if it's beneficial) hits or to get the line you want to follow for your path, obviously revenant rockets fire tracers or not depending on an even-odd tic pattern, so you may have to manipulate that... It takes a whole different sort of planning. It's not aiming to be a skill-based play - it's more about "How can you abuse the game to get it to do what you want in the fastest time possible?" That's the whole appeal of TAS.
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