The Internet Is Under Great Danger Today (In America)

2/25/2012 Edit: Well today's the day of this horrendous new system, so let me know if anything happens to you guys with it.

Hey guys, this is some urgent news that you need to know. The long-discussed "Six-Strikes" Anti-Piracy scheme will launch tomorrow on February 25th. There's a website It could have some really bad effects on the internet and it's users.

Read this article for more info.

They also have this video as well on how this will work:



Also check out this video that makes really good points against this.

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"Because of that method’s failure, the Copyright Alert System will instead focus on Internet connections that tap an amount of bandwidth consistent with what would be expected to be used by an illegal downloader."

So what is that amount of bandwidth? If I say downloaded Rage off of Steam would that trigger it? I mean seriously, downloading a 23 gigabyte file has to be piracy right? Or even just several other games in the 2-5 gigabyte range? Or alternatively, what if I was pirating programs that are only 20-100 megabytes would that fly under the radar since they're small downloads?

In the end it seems like a system that will more than likely hurt innocent people and possibly send them into a legal hell trying to defend themselves, and do very little to stop piracy. And really, their threat to 'temporarily' slow bandwidth takes away most of the teeth this would have. Although I'm sure there's more serious consequences than just bandwidth throttling, but they won't let you know what they are, because they won't tell you unless they catch you pirating. And at that point you're a filthy criminal so who gives a shit about you.

However my ISP, in the past at least, has stated they won't give out information on customers if they receive a request from a company regarding possible piracy or copyright infringement, so that's nice I guess.

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So, the music, movie and games industries are doing perfectly fine. But they're so bent on making even more money that they're willing to potentially punish non-pirates and paying customers by supporting a thoroughly ham-fisted attempt at cracking down on internet piracy.

GG.

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My old side job involved uploading and downloading gigs of photographs of lawn maintenance and maid services nightly, and since I worked from home this kind of shit would most definitely end up with me sending up false positives in their system. It's a bad idea from people who don't know what the internet actually does or how it works.

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It's an open invitation for lawsuits. There's far more legitimate uses for large amounts of data being downloaded than just piracy.


It's clearly nonsense cooked up by people who do not understand the internet and as a result the whole thing will end up a miserable failure.

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I expect the big winners from this fiasco will be smaller ISPs who aren't involved in the scheme.

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The open WiFi concerns definitely bug me, since I tend to make use of free wireless connections when I'm not at home. My school's wireless is already unreliable enough once it has a thousand stundents on it, and I can't imagine it being better if any of these students have been downloading content that causes these policies to come into effect.

But yes, I do certainly wonder what these supposed bandwidth levels are. I don't exactly fancy having to monitor exactly what I'm downloading at all times just because someone thinks that some of those things could be copyrighted resources.

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Time to download the 35GB RAGE Toolkit tomorrow and see what happens.

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This is going to fail miserable, especially in an age where people are using their computers like televisions, as in streaming lots and lots of video.

It's also retarded to assume that people who are using lots of bandwidth are pirating. MP3s and encoded video are not very large in file size, unless said violator is downloading a jukebox full of music files.

This isn't something new up here in Canada. Apparently they have a company monitoring our uses and randomly picking out abusers. At least they're not hiding this bullshit behind some lame pedophile-terrorist facade.

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The fact that this is what they're resorting to should really make it clear how dead the anti-piracy movement is.

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At this point people need to wise up and start hurting corporations where it counts. When we were kids, we used to copy media tangibly. We copied CDs to tapes and TV to VHS cassettes -- it's time people took pirating offline again. Start buying all your CDs and DVDs used. Exchange your disks with friends and rip them manually, and then exchange your files with friends by exchanging USB keys. Don't go to the theater, go to a local live band, bowling, etc. Do everything you can to make sure these corporations see less and less of your dollar and the smaller local artists see more of it. We may be the minority, but we're the guys that they are targeting. Basically the corporations are now targeting their own consumers, so apparently they don't need the money as much as they want to set an example and scare their heard. And if you can, drop your big business ISP and use a smaller local one. Also set up local networks and VPNs, proxies, etc. The net is full of ways to keep you private with a little research.

I don't even pirate. I just hate seeing big business using the legal system to hurt their consumers, the people that keep them alive. This is as corrupt as it gets, people.

AndrewB said:

The fact that this is what they're resorting to should really make it clear how dead the anti-piracy movement is.

Agreed. I just fear for the few people they are set to make an example of.

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I'm getting a new hard drive, and will be reinstalling Steam games.
This might be my last post.

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Weren't anti-P2P firms (controlled by the majors) already using similar scare tactics for several years, now? That of sending "proof" to a user (through their ISP) that he/she was caught illegally downloading X (cobbled together with some random IP logs and technobabble) along with a stern warning to "cut it out" is no news, and most ISPs were just too eager to cooperate (as none of them would want to be flagged as a "pirate friendly ISP").

Perhaps the only "novelty" here is that for the first time there's a centralized (?) administation and standardized (?) protocol and system for this sort of warning, but if they really are going to screen /flag potentially "interesting" users based on the volume of data alone (instead of e.g. packet analysis), then the tech behind all this must be really primitive or they discovered that they really can't do any better, in the general case. Perhaps the increasing use of more secure OSes and more robust P2P apps closed many security loopholes, so they resorted to dumb volume measurements...

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188DarkRevived said:

Fortunately I've already made several offline copies of all of my downloaded goodies.

I upload backed-up CDs to my Google Drive. I am kinda scared to do it with Fallout 2 and Windows 95.

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Dr. Durr said:

I upload backed-up CDs to my Google Drive. I am kinda scared to do it with Fallout 2 and Windows 95.

That's why there's external USB drives. I use both them and CDs and DVDs, and it's all out of their eyes.

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188DarkRevived said:

That's why there's external USB drives. I use both them and CDs and DVDs, and it's all out of their eyes.

I do that with previous smartphones. My HTC Touch with Windows Mobile 6.1 helped me move a lot of files easily before I started using cloud storage

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More proof that the Dark Age denizens of big media are out of control and need a wake-up call in the form of massive copyright reform.

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I know 2 people that have gotten busted by their ISP for illegally downloading movies. One downloads them all the time. No matter how many warnings she gets. The other one had her ISP cancel her service.

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Well I only uploaded the patches I use on Fallout 2 after I install it on Steam to my drive.

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I'm not the biggest tech guy out there, but would changing the extension of an audio file from .mp3 to .png do anything? And also would adding, let's say, an extra minute of silence at the end of a song help?

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Oh no! I might be punished for stealing things!

But seriously, it only affects torrents, and the fact they only reference the RIAA/MPAA as partners in the plan suggests that they're only going after movie/music torrents, so as long as you don't plan to download "Jack and Jill", you should be fine. At any rate, there are other methods of piracy (cyberlockers, Usenet) that aren't affected by this plan, and the plan's been known long enough that those that go out of their way to pirate have had time to adapt. I don't torrent much, but I likely wouldn't be affected by the stuff I do torrent.

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Quasar said:

More proof that the Dark Age denizens of big media are out of control and need a wake-up call in the form of massive copyright reform.

All I've got from this whole situation is the sad realization that modern copyright has actually created a monopoly, especially with these insane, perpetual, amendments that grant large studios indefinite rights over works who's artists are long since dead, buried, and forgotten.

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I'm no conspiracy theorist but this lines up perfectly with shitbags using vague standards for piracy that would target both actual media pirates and people like myself that have embraced digital distribution, having their cake and eating it too.

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kmxexii said:

I'm no conspiracy theorist but this lines up perfectly with shitbags using vague standards for piracy that would target both actual media pirates and people like myself that have embraced digital distribution, having their cake and eating it too.

This isn't targeted at pirates, at all; they are targeting their consumers, and they completely bypassed the legal system to monitor your internet usage. This is a last ditch effort on their part to try and strike fear into casual users.

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And internet is in great disaster in Taiwan too yesterday. A fire outbreak occurs in the Machinery Room of Chunghwa Telecom's HQ, and it it affect the internet. Because of this incident, nearly than 90% of people in Taiwan can't access the internet, same for me. :(

But it seems to be fixed now, though it still lags.

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